Question New Elements

rod

Oct 22, 2019
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Will future meteorites bring us new Atomic elements
Okay, prophecy about the future is always risky :) Astronomy does document various elements observed in starlight as well as the interstellar medium like gas clouds with various molecules, e. g. M42 in Orion - visible now in the night sky. As far as I understand - the elements measured and documented are similar to what we see today on the Periodic Table, even uranium is observed in some stellar spectra. This suggest that any future meteorites may have similar composition to what we see today.
 
Nov 25, 2019
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Okay, prophecy about the future is always risky :) Astronomy does document various elements observed in starlight as well as the interstellar medium like gas clouds with various molecules, e. g. M42 in Orion - visible now in the night sky. As far as I understand - the elements measured and documented are similar to what we see today on the Periodic Table, even uranium is observed in some stellar spectra. This suggest that any future meteorites may have similar composition to what we see today.
Right on. But I still am thinking a meteorites going to hit us and it's going to be full of a new kind of radioactive element so make room on that Atomic chart
 
Dec 1, 2019
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It is possible but unlikely as we have observed the same elements in all areas of space (that we have observed). Obviously there are elements we have not found yet but they will be very rare and extremely unlikely to arrive here in meteorites
 
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Jan 6, 2020
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Right on. But I still am thinking a meteorites going to hit us and it's going to be full of a new kind of radioactive element so make room on that Atomic chart
It appears that the Periodic Table of the Elements is quite full. The open end of the table with elements that have no primordial isotopes, starting with Hassium, have a measured life in seconds. That would indicate that those, and those with a measured life of minutes or hours, would never make it to Earth in a meteorite. Even that assumes that those meteorites could create some of those short lived elements due to intense heating on the way down.
Based upon that, I see no possibility of usable new elements arriving via Meteorite Express.
 
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Jan 7, 2020
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Right on. But I still am thinking a meteorites going to hit us and it's going to be full of a new kind of radioactive element so make room on that Atomic chart
Doesn't quite work like that, but theory basically states that we have reached the heaviest possible elements that can exist without falling apart. Every element can have isotopes (as far as I remember), if anything we would be likely to find isotopes that are only created under specific circumstances that we cannot replicate. This would be things like metallic hydrogen and helium.
 
Dec 29, 2019
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No meteorites analysed have ever been found with unknown elements in them. Astronomical observations show what we should see if the elements as we know them are universal throughout the universe. From subatomic physics to cosmology - it all conforms with and confirms that.

High levels of radioactive elements in asteroid/meteorite materials are not expected because mostly they will have decayed down to those with long half lives, ie those with low radioactivity. The existence of all that iron and nickel - the most stable, lowest radioactivity elements - is a consequence of the age of the materials and ongoing radioactive decay.

So, no. Meteorites are not going to bring use new elements and any highly radioactive elements in them are going to be at very low concentrations, from known elements undergoing radioactive decay.
 
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Jan 9, 2020
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Possibly. The most recent was iridium from the K-T boundary meteoric episode. Keep in mind all the elements have derived from the Big Bang in which the sheer explosion jumbled up the crystal arrangement of all the subparticles. In some instances, scientists have been able to replicate in the lab but the new ones have very rapid half-lifes. Iridium is the only one definitely found in interstellar matter that made its way to earth & can be id'd as definitely from solar sytem material..
 
Jan 7, 2020
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Possibly. The most recent was iridium from the K-T boundary meteoric episode. Keep in mind all the elements have derived from the Big Bang in which the sheer explosion jumbled up the crystal arrangement of all the subparticles. In some instances, scientists have been able to replicate in the lab but the new ones have very rapid half-lifes. Iridium is the only one definitely found in interstellar matter that made its way to earth & can be id'd as definitely from solar sytem material..
No, elements can be transmuted at low energy. The SAFIRE project proved this is possible, which disproves the need of Big Bang for the formation of elements. Also, I would recommend looking into the elements detected in the solar wind. I do not agree with the standard model.

Also, the mainstream idea is that mostly H and He were created after the big bang and that they formed stars, which fused elements until they exploded and created heavier elements. The current mainstream idea is that most of the heavier elements are the result of super or hypernova. It is all based on gravitational collapse.
 
Dec 29, 2019
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Possibly. The most recent was iridium from the K-T boundary meteoric episode. Keep in mind all the elements have derived from the Big Bang in which the sheer explosion jumbled up the crystal arrangement of all the subparticles. In some instances, scientists have been able to replicate in the lab but the new ones have very rapid half-lifes. Iridium is the only one definitely found in interstellar matter that made its way to earth & can be id'd as definitely from solar sytem material..
Iridium does come to Earth in meteorites but it isn't a new or unknown element. Most of Earth's Iridium is believed to be in the metallic core. It is found mixed in with nickel-iron in meteorites at higher concentrations than the average of the Earth's crust, but whilst rare, it is found on Earth, usually in combination with other Platinum Group Metals. This is apart from meteorites and the trace amounts in sediments that are evidence of major historic meteorites.

Iridium has two naturally occurring stable isotopes and what is found in meteorites has low radioactivity.
 
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Jan 9, 2020
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No, elements can be transmuted at low energy. The SAFIRE project proved this is possible, which disproves the need of Big Bang for the formation of elements. Also, I would recommend looking into the elements detected in the solar wind. I do not agree with the standard model.

Also, the mainstream idea is that mostly H and He were created after the big bang and that they formed stars, which fused elements until they exploded and created heavier elements. The current mainstream idea is that most of the heavier elements are the result of super or hypernova. It is all based on gravitational collapse.
We know that the classic cliche in any astronomy class Is this: "Stardust we are born & to stardust we return." Indeed supernovas made much of the heavier, complex stuff. But yes the basic star forms a lot of the elements. There's also a lot of the other interstellar objects...an array of meteorites which may be iron or a silicon, comets as frozen methane. Note that the Big Bang correctly refers to the expansion process of the universe. It is not the expansion of objects per se around the fabric, it is in the stellar nursery that we obtain our periodic table. After the H & He process in our own Sun, next on the list is Li.
 
Jan 10, 2020
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Our science tells us that all elements are already accounted for (except possibly a few very heavy ones) in the periodic table. Just to throw in a wild card, is a neutron star an element? After all, it is like a giant atomic nucleus. I guess there are no protons as the protons and electrons have merged to form neutrons.
 
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Oct 21, 2019
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Our science tells us that all elements are already accounted for (except possibly a few very heavy ones) in the periodic table. Just to throw in a wild card, is a neutron star an element? After all, it is like a giant atomic nucleus. I guess there are no protons as the protons and electrons have merged to form neutrons.
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