New Gamma ray discovery

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ScottS42

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Ok, I saw that the released publication on the 13 Billion light year distance gamma ray and I think visible light spectrum too
but my question is are we on the other end of the known Universe for the radiation detection of that event to reach us?
or put differently if they trained the telescopes to a certain constellation to see that burst, will pointing on the other side of the earth at the same declination and elevation see 13 or less billion light years away another Gamma ray burst (think bubble or ball shaped universe)? Where are we in relation to the Big bang explosion expansion? Our close family of Galaxy's that is. Did it happen 13 billion light years away and we are near the opposite edge of the expansion? It is hard to visualize my question in text I'm sorry.
 
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SpaceTas

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Maybe I understand what you are getting at.
In a closed universe it should be possible to "see the back of your head', or in this real case gamma-rays from both front and back of the explosion appearing to come from opposite sides of the sky. I am thinking of the closed spherical universe here, but there are more complicated geometries.

In an open universe this doesn't happen, we can see only as far out as the age of the universe in a equal or larger volume (possible with an early episode of rapid expansion = inflation). A flat and therefore open universe is the best explanation for current info such as fluctuations in cosmic background.

But looking for cosmological effects with gamma ray bursts is a good idea. It was one of the goals of the research, but I haven't heard any results. But I suspect it is being checked. I've been away from the gamma-ray burst research for a while; but there wasn't a pair of simultaneous gamma-ray bursts from opposite sides of the sky during the GRO mission. There could be delays induced by gravitational lensing along the way. Interesting project ....
 
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