Phoenix Mars Lander Extended Mission. Sol 90+ & R.I.P Sol 157.

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fsm

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>It's off topic, I know, but I wonder how the people who winge about Phoenix will react to MSL?On one hand its has aa very high coolnes factor.&nbsp; Two billion dollar mission, largest Mars lander ever, largest Mars rover ever, first nuclear powered rover, first nuclear lander since Viking, largest rover anywhere since 1972, most sophisticated lab ever,&nbsp; laser beam, neutron beam,&nbsp; movies, Skycrane landing system, etc. etc.On the other hand the expectations are very high.&nbsp; because it is nuclear some people seem to think it has almost no limiations, that it can travel fast and far, has no restrictions as to weather or latitude, nd can work 24 hours a day.&nbsp; the reality is quite different.&nbsp; It is very limited as to where it can land with respect to altitude and latitude, can't work 24 hours a day andd, if it ends up at the southern sites, will have to shut down over winter to conserve heat.&nbsp; Although it may well be faster than the MERs, the highly complex lab means that it will spent most of its time sitting still.&nbsp; So to may not offer much improvement in coverage over the 10 or so metres a day that the MERs did early on.&nbsp;So there is huge potential for disillusioment.&nbsp; Especially if some of the insanely complex equipment does&nbsp; not work as advertised, or gets jammed by grit or a pebble.&nbsp; We could se a lot of whining about NASA incompetence or why MSL was choen over repeat MERs.Jon <br /> Posted by jonclarke</DIV></p><p>I agree with that. Also the reduction in weight of some types of modern instruments could mean an only slightly heavier rover than MER could carry a lot of intrumentation - the original ExoMars rover proposal was only slightly heavier than MER, I understand. The MSL was originally assigned $650 million by National Research Council - it is now destined to top $2 billion. (http://www.nasawatch.com/archives/2008/10/msl_commentary.html) </p><p>To be fair to NASA, it is a far more ambitious mission than the MERs, and ExoMars (with some NASA instruments) was pencilled in for 2009, so there were to be two bites at the cherry. </p><p>There is a real danger that if something goes wrong with MSL, NASA could&nbsp; be left with absolutely no functioning Mars missions of any sort by around 2012.. </p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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bobble_bob

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I dont post in this thread much, mainly as i dont have much to add but i keep an eye on it from time to time. it seems reading the press releases that this mission has shown us alot of things that we didnt know already about Mars, or proved our theories wrong. The mission to me is a great success <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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JonClarke

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Hi Jon,It's not really off topic as unfortunately the uneducated in such matters seem to think they are experts overnight & despite Wayne's & yourself's quality input, they still continue to moan & troll.They will moan about MSL Jon. You know it, I know it. The thing is though, that those who post on these threads know better, a lot better & we all bother to find out what is actually happening.The bloke on the comments section still thought only 4 TEGAs were used. A two minute check online will have told him that only the Organic Free Blank has remained unused. They cannot even be bothered to find out the basics. You have explained now, what three or four times that Phoenix has EXCEEDED the MAXIMUM mission success criteria, by a huge margin. Not the minimum, the maximum.No matter what we tell them, if they cannot be bothered to find out the facts & choose to troll on this site & also on the NASA Phoenix site, than more fool them. They are missing out on something truly remarkable.It'll it be the same with MSL Jon & I think you realise that all too well. Shame really, an enormous shame indeed. I think too many watch too much Star Trek & Star Wars & thinking that they are documentaries.I just feel like doing this &nbsp; sometimes because of those who troll & cannot be bothered to find out what has really happened. Andrew Brown.&nbsp; <br />Posted by 3488</DIV></p><p>And of course if NASA (or anyone else) sends a mission that is extremely useful scientifically but very low on the coolness factor (like a network of meteorological and geophysical stations) we will see even more whining.&nbsp; </p><p>If the mission is great in every respect they will complain about the PR (like Huygens). Or the TV presence of the PI (like the idiot who said that Peter Smith was "barely cogent").</p><p>&nbsp;Damn the idots, full speed ahead!</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Whether we become a multi-planet species with unlimited horizons, or are forever confined to Earth will be decided in the twenty-first century amid the vast plains, rugged canyons and lofty mountains of Mars</em>  Arthur Clarke</p> </div>
 
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JonClarke

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>And of course if NASA (or anyone else) sends a mission that is extremely useful scientifically but very low on the coolness factor (like a network of meteorological and geophysical stations) we will see even more whining.&nbsp; If the mission is great in every respect they will complain about the PR (like Huygens). Or the TV presence of the PI (like the idiot who said that Peter Smith was "barely cogent").&nbsp;Damn the idots, full speed ahead! <br />Posted by jonclarke</DIV></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>You know, ESA gets castigated alot for having only a modest PR preence.&nbsp; Maybe they have the right idea.&nbsp; NASA spends huge amounts of money on some very slick PR and it still does not do much good.</p><p>Jon<br /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Whether we become a multi-planet species with unlimited horizons, or are forever confined to Earth will be decided in the twenty-first century amid the vast plains, rugged canyons and lofty mountains of Mars</em>  Arthur Clarke</p> </div>
 
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earth_bound_misfit

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<p>Hey look at this, Phoenix snapped a picture of a Martian <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/content/scripts/tinymce/plugins/emotions/images/smiley-wink.gif" border="0" alt="Wink" title="Wink" /></p><p><br /> <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/11/2/eb3417d1-37b8-47b7-b246-5bc9216d02de.Medium.jpg" alt="" /></p><p>I must say this Martian has done a outstanding job fighting off the knuckleheads in the reader comments on SDC.</p><p>Well done Jon. </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p> </p><p>----------------------------------------------------------------- </p><p>Wanna see this site looking like the old SDC uplink?</p><p>Go here to see how: <strong>SDC Eye saver </strong>  </p> </div>
 
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3488

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'><font color="#ff0000">Hey look at this, Phoenix snapped a picture of a Martian I must say this Martian has done a outstanding job fighting off the knuckleheads in the reader comments on SDC.Well done Jon. <br /> Posted by earth_bound_misfit</font></DIV></p><p><strong><font size="2">Absolutely earth_bound_misfit.</font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2">The detractors did resort to trolling, hense my intervention, but Jon Clarke has certainly put them all in short order. <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/1/9/f1f82198-e2c1-478a-a957-1083ead60069.Medium.gif" alt="" /></font></strong></p><p><font size="2"><strong>Where did you get that image from? Where you on an geological field trip with Jon Clarke?&nbsp;</strong></font></p><p><strong><font size="2">The thing is, it's ok to disagree, that's fine, but some of the posters crossed the line of decency into inflamatory & offensive commentary & in many cases, not even bothering to check up on even the most basic facts.</font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2">Unfortunately it is symptomatic of the general lack of even simple understanding of science, physics & technology. Also of basic manners to boot.</font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2">Wayne also went to great lengths to explain how the budget of Phoenix was tight & that NASA does not have a bottomless pit of funding. I also know that all too well, I am not even American, but I was personally part of the campaign to save this mission as well as two others.&nbsp;</font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2">Unfortunately the comments sections are linked directly to the articles on the Front Page, which means that any visitor to SDC can see them by just reading the article they are attached to. Normally this is a good thing as it affords easy accessability, but in this case, it backfired.<br /> </font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2">What might first time visitors think, if the comments section is full of trolling & offensive remarks? It puts the whole community into a bad light, by a few who only frequent that part of the service & not contribute elsewhere.&nbsp;</font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2">I have forwarded my concerns & observations to dh, regarding this & hopefully in future the comments section can be&nbsp; kept clear of trolling. Disagreements are fine, but trolling isn't.&nbsp;</font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2">I have just checked the Phoenix sites & there appears to be no news, so hopefully Phoenix is just using these few sols recharging her batteries. </font></strong> <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/14/9/5e872d94-dea4-4c94-89c9-d6573bf109b2.Medium.gif" alt="" /><br /> </p><p><strong><font size="2">Andrew Brown.&nbsp;</font></strong></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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JonClarke

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<p>Thanks guys!&nbsp; Sometimes my dander really gets up...</p><p>That image is off the Australian Centre for Astrobiology web site, it was taken during my stint at the Mars Desert Research Station in Utah in 2003.</p><p>Jon</p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Whether we become a multi-planet species with unlimited horizons, or are forever confined to Earth will be decided in the twenty-first century amid the vast plains, rugged canyons and lofty mountains of Mars</em>  Arthur Clarke</p> </div>
 
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earth_bound_misfit

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'> Where did you get that image from? <br /> Posted by 3488</DIV></p><p>I lifted it from here http://aca.mq.edu.au/People/jclarke.htm , hope you didn't mind Jon. Interesting read btw.</p><p>I should've make mention of you (3488) and MW for a job well done as well.</p><p>Cheers EBM ;) </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p> </p><p>----------------------------------------------------------------- </p><p>Wanna see this site looking like the old SDC uplink?</p><p>Go here to see how: <strong>SDC Eye saver </strong>  </p> </div>
 
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JonClarke

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Not at all! <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Whether we become a multi-planet species with unlimited horizons, or are forever confined to Earth will be decided in the twenty-first century amid the vast plains, rugged canyons and lofty mountains of Mars</em>  Arthur Clarke</p> </div>
 
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JonClarke

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<p>I have been exercising my mind as to what would appeal to this sort of people.</p><p>Obviously the mission ahs to be "cool" -</p><p>Cool media: "Real colour" images! Sound! Movies! HDTV!&nbsp; Science comes a distant second (loved the comment by one person who prefered a 10 second sound bite over more analyses!).</p><p>Cool scenery: Hills! Craters!&nbsp; Valleys! The MERs have done OK here.</p><p>Cool technology: Rovers!&nbsp; (but wait until another small rover is sent, then there will be complaints!) Balloons! Aircraft! Penetrators! Drills! Impactors! Sample Return!</p><p>Long life (unless it goes out with a bang like an impactor)</p><p>I wouldn't complain about a lot of these&nbsp;of course, but it would be a pity about the very important and unexciting missions like atmospheric science missions, aeronomy orbiters, met station networks, seismometers, numerous mid size rovers.&nbsp; Or the fact that the negineers always win when it comes to landing site choice.&nbsp; or the useful payload tht is sacrificed for the HDTV.</p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Whether we become a multi-planet species with unlimited horizons, or are forever confined to Earth will be decided in the twenty-first century amid the vast plains, rugged canyons and lofty mountains of Mars</em>  Arthur Clarke</p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>&nbsp;<br />Posted by jonclarke</DIV><br /><br />Jon, you have done a fine job on trash patrol. I considered adding a few comments, but they would have been unecessary, considering the dead bodies on the side of the road :) <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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earth_bound_misfit

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'> missions like atmospheric science missions, aeronomy orbiters, met station networks, seismometers<br /> Posted by jonclarke</DIV></p><p>Hmm, brought a thought to mind. Are there any seismic monitors on Mars or has there ever? If so, have they ever recorded any seismic activity? Is Mars geologically active eg: active volcanoes?</p><p>Boy this post really shows my noobness on this subject lol. </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p> </p><p>----------------------------------------------------------------- </p><p>Wanna see this site looking like the old SDC uplink?</p><p>Go here to see how: <strong>SDC Eye saver </strong>  </p> </div>
 
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JonClarke

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Hmm, brought a thought to mind. Are there any seismic monitors on Mars or has there ever? If so, have they ever recorded any seismic activity? Is Mars geologically active eg: active volcanoes?Boy this post really shows my noobness on this subject lol. <br />Posted by earth_bound_misfit</DIV></p><p>Someone else is obviously also taking a four day weekend!&nbsp; We should meet for coffee...</p><p>The Vkiigs carried seismometers.&nbsp; the Viking&nbsp; seismometer did not deploy and the Viking two instrument gave crap data because of wind vibration.&nbsp; But it did pick up a couple of events.</p><p>You need a minimum of three stations to get world wide coverage assuming large events.&nbsp; But then you could work out the gross interior structure of the planet and pick areas of activity.&nbsp; </p><p>With more stations you could look at regional variations - differences in crustal structure between the north and south, under Hellas and Argyre, and between Tharsis and Marineris</p><p>Jon</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Whether we become a multi-planet species with unlimited horizons, or are forever confined to Earth will be decided in the twenty-first century amid the vast plains, rugged canyons and lofty mountains of Mars</em>  Arthur Clarke</p> </div>
 
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earth_bound_misfit

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Someone else is obviously also taking a four day weekend!&nbsp; <br /> Posted by jonclarke</DIV></p><p>Nope just got a crusiey Job ;) </p><p>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'> We should meet for coffee...<br /> Posted by jonclarke</DIV> </p><p>I would like that. Funny we both lived in the same suburb but never met. I've actually just brought and moved into a joint in Conder. Should I pop into Geosciences sometime and we can meet?</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p> </p><p>----------------------------------------------------------------- </p><p>Wanna see this site looking like the old SDC uplink?</p><p>Go here to see how: <strong>SDC Eye saver </strong>  </p> </div>
 
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JonClarke

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Nope just got a crusiey Job ;) I would like that. Funny we both lived in the same suburb but never met. I've actually just brought and moved into a joint in Conder. Should I pop into Geosciences sometime and we can meet? <br />Posted by earth_bound_misfit</DIV></p><p>Sure!&nbsp; Just ask for me at reception and I will come down, assuming I am in of course!</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Whether we become a multi-planet species with unlimited horizons, or are forever confined to Earth will be decided in the twenty-first century amid the vast plains, rugged canyons and lofty mountains of Mars</em>  Arthur Clarke</p> </div>
 
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efron_24

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<p>such sad news about Phoenix</p><p>it is about to die</p><p>and there seems to be nothing that we can do about it</p><p>&nbsp;After all the great info about Mars it gave to us.. we have to let it go</p><p>this is sad !</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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victo

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<p>Hello Everybody,</p><p>Last week I put on a question but nobody sent even a response... May I sent it in the wrong thread or nobody knows answer? (I cannot beleive because I see really informed and clever team here :) )</p><p>So I gently repeat it maybe this time someone can drop me some answer: </p><p>Sorry if that was discussed before but I couldn't find any explanation, what is "pyrotechnic initiation unit" for and why they kept it alive until this time? It sound to me as a self distruction device. :)</p><p>&nbsp;vIC </p>
 
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JonClarke

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<p>The reason nobody answered is that nobody knows.</p><p>Several of the operations during the descent would have been activated by small pyrotechnics- explosive bolts.&nbsp; The initiation device is presumably the electronic controller of these.</p><p>Nobody seems to know why the heater was left on after&nbsp; landing.&nbsp; There&nbsp; are people in the Planetary Society&nbsp;tracking it down though.</p><p>The only think I can think of is that the heater also provides warmth to the electronics generally.</p><p>Jon</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Whether we become a multi-planet species with unlimited horizons, or are forever confined to Earth will be decided in the twenty-first century amid the vast plains, rugged canyons and lofty mountains of Mars</em>  Arthur Clarke</p> </div>
 
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victo

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>The reason nobody answered is that nobody knows.Several of the operations during the descent would have been activated by small pyrotechnics- explosive bolts.&nbsp; The initiation device is presumably the electronic controller of these.Nobody seems to know why the heater was left on after&nbsp; landing.&nbsp; There&nbsp; are people in the Planetary Society&nbsp;tracking it down though.The only think I can think of is that the heater also provides warmth to the electronics generally.Jon <br /> Posted by jonclarke</DIV></p><p>Thanks very much Jon!</p><p>vIC</p>
 
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JonClarke

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>The reason nobody answered is that nobody knows.Several of the operations during the descent would have been activated by small pyrotechnics- explosive bolts.&nbsp; The initiation device is presumably the electronic controller of these.Nobody seems to know why the heater was left on after&nbsp; landing.&nbsp; There&nbsp; are people in the Planetary Society&nbsp;tracking it down though.The only thing I can think of is that the heater also provides warmth to the electronics generally.Jon <br />Posted by jonclarke</DIV><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Whether we become a multi-planet species with unlimited horizons, or are forever confined to Earth will be decided in the twenty-first century amid the vast plains, rugged canyons and lofty mountains of Mars</em>  Arthur Clarke</p> </div>
 
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JonClarke

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Jon, you have done a fine job on trash patrol. I considered adding a few comments, but they would have been unecessary, considering the dead bodies on the side of the road :) <br />Posted by MeteorWayne</DIV></p><p>Nothing compared to the Hoagland wars! <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/content/scripts/tinymce/plugins/emotions/images/smiley-wink.gif" border="0" alt="Wink" title="Wink" /><br /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Whether we become a multi-planet species with unlimited horizons, or are forever confined to Earth will be decided in the twenty-first century amid the vast plains, rugged canyons and lofty mountains of Mars</em>  Arthur Clarke</p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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<p><br />Latest update from the LPL team: </p><p>&nbsp;</p><h1>NASA Hearing Daily From Weak Phoenix Mars Lander </h1><p><br /><strong>November 3, 2008</strong> -- NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander has communicated with controllers daily since Oct. 30 through relays to Mars orbiters. Information received over the weekend indicates Phoenix is running out of power each afternoon or evening but reawakening after its solar arrays catch morning sunlight. <br /><br />The fraction of each day with sun above the horizon is declining at the Martian arctic landing site. Dust raised by a storm last week continues to block some of the sunshine. <br /><br />"This is exactly the scenario we expected for the mission's final phase, though the dust storm brought it a couple weeks sooner than we had hoped," said Phoenix Project Manager Barry Goldstein of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. "We will be trying to gain some additional science during however many days we have left. Any day could be our last." <br /><br />Mission engineers at JPL and at Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, are attempting this week to upload commands to be stored in the lander's flash memory for science activities to be conducted when the lander wakes up each day. <br /><br />"Weather observations are our top priority now," said Phoenix Principal Investigator Peter Smith. "If there's enough energy, we will try to get readings from the conductivity probe that has been inserted into the soil, and possibly some images to assess frost buildup." </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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3488

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<p><font size="2"><strong>Thank you very much Wayne.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2"><strong>I really really hope beyond hope that at least we get a few more sols & further imagery to see if the frost is actually&nbsp; accumulating now & not just subliming in the afternoon.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2"><strong>It is great that Phoenix is at least talking every sol now, even if not returning much data for the moment.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2"><strong>But as I said before, if Phoenix does fail right now, the mission has still been an enormous success, far better than we could have hoped for by a huge margin.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2"><strong>Lets hope, she awakes enough to return some more images & weather data.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2"><strong>Andrew Brown.&nbsp;</strong></font></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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3488

Guest
<p><font size="2"><strong>Still no news, I am checking very regularly as you all may well understand.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2"><strong>Latest images from Sol 151 & still no written updates since 3rd November. No news is good news perhaps. Every sol we hear nothing, the less likely IMO that Phoenix will continue. I hope that I'm wrong & we'll get some more data as the northern hemisphere of Mars continues to advance towards Autumn.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2"><strong>Now it is the equivalent of the end of the third week of August. On Earth of course we have the oceans & they cause a lag effect with much of the Northern Hemisphere of Earth, having the hottest days of the year in August, when the longest are back in June. If this were Earth, Phoenix would be likely recording the highest temperatures of the mission to date or at least recently had done so.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2"><strong>Of course Scandia Colles in the Vastitas Borealis on Mars, no such lag effect (there was indeed a minor one, but only a few sols after the Solstice), so the highest temperatures were around & just after the Summer Solstice.&nbsp;</strong></font></p><p><font size="2"><strong>So now it is getting much colder as temperature & daylight hours are related. One interesting thing though, is that Spring is cold but short. MRO HiRISE spotted ice in the Phoenix Lander area right up until 12 Sols prior to Phoenix's successful EDL. Shows how cold that surface gets.&nbsp;</strong></font></p><p><font size="2"><strong>A few bits I have done, to hopefully tide us over till we hear one way or the other.</strong></font></p><p><font size="5">Looking North of colour Panorama.</font><br /> <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/5/2/852278ce-e7e8-4512-82c8-284330ad9cc1.Medium.jpg" alt="" /></p><p><font size="5">Looking East of colour Panorama. </font><br /> <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/14/1/8eba720e-f261-4d16-a19f-b805de9c299d.Medium.jpg" alt="" /></p><p><font size="5">Looking South of colour Panorama. </font><br /> <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/2/13/f208c319-38a2-4e06-9d12-5beb3681b1df.Medium.jpg" alt="" /></p><p><font size="5">Looking West of colour Panorama. </font><br /> <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/3/10/836e6ec1-6b2b-4608-ba72-37eead7a7a2b.Medium.jpg" alt="" /></p><p><font size="5">28 degree wide view looking due north.</font></p><p><font size="2"><strong> Martian North Pole is approx 1,301 KM / 809 Miles away dead centre. </strong></font><br /> <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/0/9/f091914f-36d2-4d0e-b9fc-6ed24166ff8d.Medium.jpg" alt="" /></p><p><br /><font size="5">28 degree wide view looking due south.</font><br /> <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/6/10/863d36c6-8e3b-4ea1-aa75-b598e5df9ee2.Medium.jpg" alt="" /></p><p><font size="5">Hills in the Southwest.</font><br /> <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/13/12/2d679a79-26b3-47d6-8cf9-6bcc453df0c8.Medium.jpg" alt="" /><br />&nbsp;</p><p><font size="5">Detail of hills in the SW in colour. </font><br /> <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/10/5/ba5e9355-f277-4cf4-b529-ca94e1b78f24.Medium.jpg" alt="" /></p><p><font size="5">Hills in the NW.&nbsp; </font></p><p><font size="5">http://my1.photodump.com/uploads/3488/f581e0d9c2333bd3.jpg</font><img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/1/3/f19b4dec-0aab-4cbf-b3b6-539b1eae8c6d.Medium.jpg" alt="" /></p><p><font size="5">Large Swathe from SE to SSE. </font><br /> <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/6/4/86851728-fccf-42dd-a4c8-178dd42daa40.Medium.jpg" alt="" /> </p><p><font size="5">Centred on large boulder at Azm 151.58 degrees.</font><br /> <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/7/8/17fdc25a-42ac-4ab4-b8f5-62c9b277f52a.Medium.jpg" alt="" /><br />&nbsp;</p><p><font size="2"><strong>Andrew Brown.&nbsp;</strong></font></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
M

MeteorWayne

Guest
<p>Could this be the end?? :(</p><p>NASA will hold a media teleconference at 4 p.m. EST today, Monday, Nov. 10, to discuss the status of the Phoenix Mars Lander. Phoenix has been operating on the Red Planet for more than five months.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>I'll post a link later</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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