Place your bets - Will it fly (back)? :)

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centsworth_II

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Enough talk already. Someone <b>book a flight </b>and<br />let us know what happens! <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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earth_bound_misfit

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$3500 for a cheap seat, $8900 for a flight with Buzz. Hmm any sponsers out there? <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p> </p><p>----------------------------------------------------------------- </p><p>Wanna see this site looking like the old SDC uplink?</p><p>Go here to see how: <strong>SDC Eye saver </strong>  </p> </div>
 
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earth_bound_misfit

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<p>&nbsp;Full story here: http://www.news.com.au/story/0,23599,23411322-23109,00.html</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>In an unprecedented experiment, a Japanese astronaut has thrown a boomerang in space and confirmed it flies back much like on Earth. </p><p>Astronaut Takao Doi "threw a boomerang and saw it come back" during his free time on March 18 at the International Space Station, a spokeswoman at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency said.</p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p> </p><p>----------------------------------------------------------------- </p><p>Wanna see this site looking like the old SDC uplink?</p><p>Go here to see how: <strong>SDC Eye saver </strong>  </p> </div>
 
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centsworth_II

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'><font color="#666699">In an unprecedented experiment, a Japanese astronaut has thrown a boomerang in space and confirmed it flies back much like on Earth. <br /> Posted by earth_bound_misfit</font></DIV></p><p>Another of the great unanswered question finally put to rest!</p><p>Unfortunately I couldn't see the news report and the JAXA web site doesn't have any updated information.&nbsp; I look forward to details.&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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lukman

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My question is: under zero gravity,&nbsp;almost vacum space with nothing to push on,&nbsp;and no other external force, if the boomerang was thrown and it comes back then the thrower didnt grab the return, will the boomerang motion in cirular will be eternity? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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centsworth_II

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'><font color="#666699">My question is: under zero gravity,&nbsp;almost vacum space... will the boomerang motion in cirular will be eternity? <br /> Posted by lukman</font></DIV></p>The experiment took place inside the space station, not in a near vacuum.&nbsp; Even if it was not caught and did not hit the a wall, friction with the air in the station would slow it down.&nbsp; If the boomerang was thrown outside of the station, in the vacuum of space, there would be no aerodynamic effect and it would go into orbit around the Earth, like every other object thrown from the space station. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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bearack

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>THE ANSWER! <br />Posted by centsworth_II</DIV><br /><br />I think if they performed this outside the capsule, a totally different result would occur.&nbsp; The cabin is flooded with gases, i.e. Oxygen which allows for the gyro to gain friction.&nbsp; Without O2, I think the boomerang would just keep a constant motion.</p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><br /><img id="06322a8d-f18d-4ab1-8ea7-150275a4cb53" src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/6/14/06322a8d-f18d-4ab1-8ea7-150275a4cb53.Large.jpg" alt="blog post photo" /></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I think if they performed this outside the capsule, a totally different result would occur.&nbsp; The cabin is flooded with gases, i.e. Oxygen which allows for the gyro to gain friction.&nbsp; Without O2, I think the boomerang would just keep a constant motion.&nbsp; <br />Posted by bearack</DIV></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Exactly. Without air (or gases) a boomerang is just a very flat gyroscope.</p><p>And if projected in a direction and speed it will continue that way "unless acted on by an outside force"<br /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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