Planck's constant ¿

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dabiznuss

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Planck's constant is defined as a unit of action ( energy * time) is power in any way&nbsp;related to planck's constant b/c power is defined as&nbsp;energy&nbsp;being transmitted, or the amount of energy required or expended for a given unit of time. Here we are in comparison with power Of E.M. waves? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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DrRocket

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Planck's constant is defined as a unit of action ( energy * time) is power in any way&nbsp;related to planck's constant b/c power is defined as&nbsp;energy&nbsp;being transmitted, or the amount of energy required or expended for a given unit of time. Here we are in comparison with power Of E.M. waves? <br />Posted by dabiznuss</DIV></p><p>Planck's constant has, as you said, units of energy * time.&nbsp; I don't see that as "actionn".&nbsp; Power is, by definition energy expended per unit time which therefore has units of energy/time.&nbsp; For electromagnetic waves power is adequately described by the Poynting vector which is E X B (the vector cross product of the E and B fields).</p><p>Beyond that I have no idea what you are talking about.<br /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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