planet zeus

Status
Not open for further replies.
S

spaceinquisitor

Guest
Is there any planet zeus .which has water , atmosphere, ..........but only life is missing..?
 
Q

qso1

Guest
Not in the world of actual astronomy. No known planets fit that criteria. One day we may discover such a world but it would be nearly impossible to say for sure if it has life or not without actually going and investigating.<br /><br />IIRC, Zeus is the Greek God of Gods, and Jupiter is the Roman mythological version of Zeus. The planet Jupiter is the closest we have to a planet Zeus and thats by association with its namesake.<br /><br />To date, their have been over 260 exoplanets discovered and one day as our capabilities improve, we might find a world such as the Zeus you describe. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><strong>My borrowed quote for the time being:</strong></p><p><em>There are three kinds of people in life. Those who make it happen, those who watch it happen...and those who do not know what happened.</em></p> </div>
 
B

brigandier

Guest
Well, there's a MOON that almost fits that description. Saturn's moon, Titan, has stable liquid bodies on its surface. I'm not sure if it's water, though.
 
M

MeteorWayne

Guest
It's not water. At that temperature, any water would be hard as a rock. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
B

bdewoody

Guest
This reminds me of a famous quote. A little knowledge is a dangerous thing. The liquid on Titan is most likely methane. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <em><font size="2">Bob DeWoody</font></em> </div>
 
A

alokmohan

Guest
But they keep on hinting that it is water ocean.ACTUALLY I am fish merchant.I have invested in Titan.Do you see no hope?
 
A

adrenalynn

Guest
Are you familiar with the freezing-point of water, Alokmohan? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p>.</p><p><font size="3">bipartisan</font>  (<span style="color:blue" class="pointer"><span class="pron"><font face="Lucida Sans Unicode" size="2">bī-pär'tĭ-zən, -sən</font></span></span>) [Adj.]  Maintaining the ability to blame republications when your stimulus plan proves to be a devastating failure.</p><p><strong><font color="#ff0000"><font color="#ff0000">IMPE</font><font color="#c0c0c0">ACH</font> <font color="#0000ff"><font color="#c0c0c0">O</font>BAMA</font>!</font></strong></p> </div>
 
3

3488

Guest
Hi alokmohan,<br /><br />AVERAGE surface temperatures on Titan are MINUS 180 Celsius or 93 KELVIN.<br /><br />Freezing point of fresh water @ 1 bar is 0 Celsius or 273 KELVIN.<br /><br />Titan is much, much too cold for liquid water. Water Ice on Titan is as hard as solid rock.<br /><br />Lakes on Titan are likely to be Methane, as that is liquid around Minus 183 Celsius,<br />or 90 Kelvin, the average surface temperature of Titan's Winter polar region.<br /><br />This is what Adrenalynn was trying to tell you.<br /><br />Hope that helps.<br /><br /><img src="/images/icons/laugh.gif" /> <img src="/images/icons/laugh.gif" /> <img src="/images/icons/laugh.gif" /> Happy Boxing Day everyone. <img src="/images/icons/laugh.gif" /> <img src="/images/icons/laugh.gif" /> <img src="/images/icons/laugh.gif" /><br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
M

majornature

Guest
It seems that the farther you go the weirder it gets. From Hydrogen Dioxide (H2O) oceans to Methane (CH4) oceans. I agree 3488... it water is on Titan, it would be as hard as a solid rock. Just imagine for a moment if you were on Titan. You'll be a frozen popcycle sliding across the moon's floor continuously.<br /><br />To much hydrocarbons are a bad thing...<img src="/images/icons/laugh.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font size="2" color="#14ea50"><strong><font size="1">We are born.  We live.  We experiment.  We rot.  We die.  and the whole process starts all over again!  Imagine That!</font><br /><br /><br /><img id="6e5c6b4c-0657-47dd-9476-1fbb47938264" style="width:176px;height:247px" src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/14/4/6e5c6b4c-0657-47dd-9476-1fbb47938264.Large.jpg" alt="blog post photo" width="276" height="440" /><br /></strong></font> </div>
 
Q

qso1

Guest
Brigandier:<br />Well, there's a MOON that almost fits that description.<br /><br />Me:<br />The ancients were not aware of Titan AFAIK. Zeus in ancient Greek mythology was Jupiter. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><strong>My borrowed quote for the time being:</strong></p><p><em>There are three kinds of people in life. Those who make it happen, those who watch it happen...and those who do not know what happened.</em></p> </div>
 
Q

qso1

Guest
Ancient man was pretty much hobbled by the fact they had no instruments with which to see what the planets were really like. Despite that, they began to shift from considering the heavenly bodies from being Gods to being natural objects. It just took them awhile. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><strong>My borrowed quote for the time being:</strong></p><p><em>There are three kinds of people in life. Those who make it happen, those who watch it happen...and those who do not know what happened.</em></p> </div>
 
A

alokmohan

Guest
If there were no moon,there would have been no astronomy beause it helped us to see moving stars and fixed stars and zodiac.
 
Q

qso1

Guest
Astronomy would be tougher without a moon, especially for the ancients. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><strong>My borrowed quote for the time being:</strong></p><p><em>There are three kinds of people in life. Those who make it happen, those who watch it happen...and those who do not know what happened.</em></p> </div>
 
M

MeteorWayne

Guest
The sun and the planets would still travel the path of the zodiac, so the ecliptic would still have been known since ancient times. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
A

alokmohan

Guest
We could conceive of eclilptic as moon was reference point.Wihout that reference point argriculturists would be in trouble.
 
M

MeteorWayne

Guest
That;s not true. Most agriculural references were either to the sunrise sunset points, or the rising of specific bright stars such as Sirius.<br /><br />And yes, I'm sirius <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
M

majornature

Guest
Lame...<img src="/images/icons/tongue.gif" /><br /><br />Most of those agricultural references are still in use today...are they not? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font size="2" color="#14ea50"><strong><font size="1">We are born.  We live.  We experiment.  We rot.  We die.  and the whole process starts all over again!  Imagine That!</font><br /><br /><br /><img id="6e5c6b4c-0657-47dd-9476-1fbb47938264" style="width:176px;height:247px" src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/14/4/6e5c6b4c-0657-47dd-9476-1fbb47938264.Large.jpg" alt="blog post photo" width="276" height="440" /><br /></strong></font> </div>
 
M

MeteorWayne

Guest
I know it was lame, but I couldn't resist. No willpower.<br /><br />Well our current calendar provides all the info we need for agriculture, as it's extremely accurate. However, the guideposts in the sky are still there for use by those who need it, and those who love it.<br />The season's start and ends are still tied to astronomical events, although the weather has it's own seasonal schedule.<br /><br />Wayne <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
J

jasonpply

Guest
back before modern technology when the ancients believed we became stars when we died of course they would have labled the planets as gods considering the fact that they were the only thing in the sky that moved besides the moon not knowing what they were woulda confused anyone lol
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

ASK THE COMMUNITY