Protons

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v_for_vendetta

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<p>I read that there is some experiment that is trying to prove that Protons decay, my question to you is, do you think that it is highly plausible that they do?</p><p>of course my opinion would be my own answer but I just want to see others answers. In my opinion I think it does not decay, but then again most of the stuff that scientists come up with might not be 100% bullet proof since the universe is subject to any changes and so are the laws. </p>
 
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derekmcd

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I read that there is some experiment that is trying to prove that Protons decay, my question to you is, do you think that it is highly plausible that they do?of course my opinion would be my own answer but I just want to see others answers. In my opinion I think it does not decay, but then again most of the stuff that scientists come up with might not be 100% bullet proof since the universe is subject to any changes and so are the laws. <br /> Posted by v_for_vendetta</DIV></p><p>Almost all particle do decay, but the ones that don't are bound by conservation of mass/energy or charge.<br /> </p><p>The photon being the most obvious being massless can't decay.&nbsp; Another reason a photon can't decay is because it is impossible for it to have a half life due to time dilation... time doesn't pass in it's reference frame.&nbsp;</p><p>The electron is the least massive lepton and doesn't decay.</p><p>The proton is the least massive baryon.&nbsp; I would agree with you and suspect they don't decay either.&nbsp; At least not in the Standard Model. </p><p>The up quark is the least massive quark... I don't believe these decay either, but am not quite sure.&nbsp; I doubt it because a proton contains 2 up quark and a down quark.&nbsp; What is there left to decay into?&nbsp; A neutron can decay into a protron because one of it's 2 down quarks become an up quark releasing an electron conserving both charge and mass. </p><p>I don't think gluons and neutrinos have enough mass to decay into anything either.</p><p>There's probably others, but I don't know them.&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div> </div><br /><div><span style="color:#0000ff" class="Apple-style-span">"If something's hard to do, then it's not worth doing." - Homer Simpson</span></div> </div>
 
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DrRocket

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>...The proton is the least massive baryon.&nbsp; I would agree with you and suspect they don't decay either.&nbsp; At least not in the Standard Model. ....&nbsp; <br />Posted by derekmcd</DIV><br /><br />http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proton_decay <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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derekmcd

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proton_decay <br /> Posted by DrRocket</DIV></p><p>That's why I finished my thought with a reference to the standard model. <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/content/scripts/tinymce/plugins/emotions/images/smiley-wink.gif" border="0" alt="Wink" title="Wink" /> </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div> </div><br /><div><span style="color:#0000ff" class="Apple-style-span">"If something's hard to do, then it's not worth doing." - Homer Simpson</span></div> </div>
 
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