Quantum experiment idea

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PJay_A

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<p>Create a pair of particles. Sepparate them. Keep one in a lab some where and send the other to the Internal Space Station for an extended period of time, enough time for a measurable age difference between the two upon its return to earth. Once returned to earth, return the particle to the lab where its sibling has been stored. Invoke a change to the sibling particle. Record the microtime this change was invoked and the microtime its sibling particle is affected.</p><p>This will either answer or raise new questions of the relationships between space, time, and matter. </p>
 
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derekmcd

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Create a pair of particles. Sepparate them. Keep one in a lab some where and send the other to the Internal Space Station for an extended period of time, enough time for a measurable age difference between the two upon its return to earth. Once returned to earth, return the particle to the lab where its sibling has been stored. Invoke a change to the sibling particle. Record the microtime this change was invoked and the microtime its sibling particle is affected.This will either answer or raise new questions of the relationships between space, time, and matter. <br /> Posted by PJay_A</DIV></p><p>Special Relativity applies locally while quantum entanglement does not... it is a non-local effect.&nbsp; I doubt quantum entanglement could be measured in such a way to show that the time dilation of a particle would affect the time of entanglement.&nbsp;&nbsp; Besides, we really don't have a baseline for the speed of entanglement in which to make comparisons. </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div> </div><br /><div><span style="color:#0000ff" class="Apple-style-span">"If something's hard to do, then it's not worth doing." - Homer Simpson</span></div> </div>
 
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vandivx

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<p>sounds like good reply, I think also that entanglement property (given that entaglement was meant but I also suppose so) wouldn't survive through all those extended manipulations</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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jessez13

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<p>I think you misunderstand quantum entanglement. In quantum entanglement you create a pair of particles that by some conservation law has their states related.&nbsp; For example if their total angular momentum was zero then if one is measured to be spin up, the other will be measured spin down.&nbsp; Lets say you created two particle A and B (in this case photons are particles).&nbsp; To start with you do not know which state A or B is in, you only know the probability that they will each be in the spin up or the spin down state.&nbsp; It is otherwise totally random.&nbsp; The prevailing quantum theory is that their actual states are not determined until they are measured, meanwhile they are in a state that is a combination of all the possible states and acts as such, but if measure the state of particle A this instantly determines the state of particle B, no matter what the distance is between them.&nbsp; B changes to a single measurable state (up if A is down and down if A is up).&nbsp; </p><p>&nbsp;The useful feature of entangled particle is that you are only allowed to measure them once or it dosen't work. If someone else measured B first you would get a different answer when you measured B.&nbsp; From this you can created a system in which no one can "listen in" on your calls without you knowing.&nbsp; </p><p>To do this you send a coded message the old fashion way and a stream of entangled particles as the code key.&nbsp; If the message is in binary the sender measures the A particles then encodes the message and sends the B particles to the intended recipient.&nbsp; If someone tries to "listen in" the code key (the B particles) will no longer decode the message and the recipient will know he is being spied upon and can have the sender stop sending.&nbsp; </p><p>Your experiment won't work because the only way particle A can affect particle B or particle B can affect particle A is to measure one of them to see which state it is in.&nbsp; And of course the only choice you can make is when to measure A or B, you can not know or change what the answer will be of the first one you measure or have measured.&nbsp; If you make any other changes to only one of the particles first it does not affect the other particle and they will no longer be entangled if you affect the state you wish to measure. </p><p>&nbsp;</p>
 
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