Quantum 'kick' on big object measured for 1st time ever

Jul 2, 2020
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Not only is the quantum charge interaction (in particular +/-) the basis of quantum motions, when charge and energy are balanced, it is possible for pair-formation at higher (1.0216 MeV) energies, when matter (as +/- electrons) is formed. These stable photon systems provide the original clock references which define "Time", and they even are the basis of our very existence. Not only is all matter composed of these stable particles, their spin interaction provides for the continuous evolution of larger and larger atomic structures -- from our scale to large scale astronomical structures.
 
Jun 1, 2020
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Can LIGO tell if one of the massive objects is a dark matter object? Apparently black holes, neutron stars etc can be distinguished. Why not dark matter objects?
 
Jun 1, 2020
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It is very sensitive. Some of the best transmission electron microscopes resolve 0.01 nm or 1E-11. Atomic Force Microscopes may reach 1E-12. If you hold your mouth right and the wind is blowing in the right direction.
 
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Reactions: Torbjorn Larsson
Jan 4, 2020
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Can LIGO tell if one of the massive objects is a dark matter object? Apparently black holes, neutron stars etc can be distinguished. Why not dark matter objects?
Dark matter objects are particles that interact gravitationally, as well as clumps of them that we now see by gravitational lensing.

There isn't any localized dark matter clump mergers, say, that would generate strong gravitational waves.
 
Jun 1, 2020
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Dark matter objects are particles that interact gravitationally, as well as clumps of them that we now see by gravitational lensing.

There isn't any localized dark matter clump mergers, say, that would generate strong gravitational waves.
I don't see how it can be both ways: strong enough to hold galaxies together and make up more of the universes mass, then say there isn't enough gravity in the dark matter to clump dark matter together. This appears to be a contradiction. I would expect more black holes to form from dark matter than "regular" matter. How about dark matter solar masses? Nope. Too many contradictions. It either has gravitational force or it doesn't.
 
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Reactions: rod
Jun 1, 2020
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Musing on this thread a bit. Is it possible dark matter only has gravitational pull on our regular matter, but little or none on itself? Would explain no clumps of dark matter, but seems ridiculous since this would muck with the space fabric explanation of gravity.
 

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