Question question about distribution of dark matter.

Apr 1, 2022
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i hear that the galaxies are not massive enough to spin at the rate we observe and thus dark matter. Most common is a halo distribution model. My question is would more massive mass satisfy the distribution requirements. If mass weighed more in the past? Mass increase is a relativistic effect. Cosmology doesn't currently apply relativistic effects to the universe as a whole. If they did how would this factor in?
 
Layperson's perspective,
It would distribute the mass largely appropriately,
But that greater mass would decidedly affect all the gravity interactions between visible bodies.

Back to the drawing board, imo.
 
Jan 2, 2024
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i hear that the galaxies are not massive enough to spin at the rate we observe and thus dark matter. Most common is a halo distribution model. My question is would more massive mass satisfy the distribution requirements. If mass weighed more in the past? Mass increase is a relativistic effect. Cosmology doesn't currently apply relativistic effects to the universe as a whole. If they did how would this factor in?
There is a published theory on this point. It uses Dilation (relativity) to explain the issues. At the time I thought it made sense and am surprised it has been largely ignored. It might be worth trying to look it up.
 
Jan 2, 2024
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110
Visit site
There is a published theory on this point. It uses Dilation (relativity) to explain the issues. At the time I thought it made sense and am surprised it has been largely ignored. It might be worth trying to look it up.
I found a paper that might be what you’re looking for. It discusses the motion of stars in galaxies and proposes a solution using gravitational time dilation. The paper suggests that the problem of the motion of stars in our galaxy can be solved by applying a gravitational time dilation factor in combination with Newton’s theory. This approach considers the flow of time in a weak gravitational field, such as where the Sun orbits the Milky Way, and applies a time dilation factor to explain the observed motion of stars.
the paper titled “The motion of stars in galaxies and the gravitational time dilatation” available on arXiv1.
 
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