Random uneducated question

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TranquilChaos

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<p>I was thinking something earlier(a joke about it was so cold there that it took my dog 2 seconds for my dog to hear my command and react).&nbsp; This is probably a dumb question, but i'm just curious, and i don't think it will take any research from many of you here, or much typing. </p><p>So my question is, can temerature affect time?&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p>I was thinking of an experiment, although i'm sure it isn't the best experiment, but i came up with it after a few other ideas and decided it was the best i was going to come up with.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </p><p>Okay, say you set up 2 vaccuums of equal sizes, say a few miles(50). Would a sound, say an air horn sound(i don't think decibels matter), that were let off at the same time, reach the opposite side at the same time as the other if one temperature was really high, say 500 degrees farenheit, and the other&nbsp; was very low, like -200 degrees.</p><p>I'm not sure if temp. affects the speed of sound(and if it can then maybe even the speed of light?) or if it can also/instead be applied to time, if in fact they are affected by temperature.</p><p>So, is this bad joke totally implausible? Thanks</p>
 
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MeteorWayne

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I was thinking something earlier(a joke about it was so cold there that it took my dog 2 seconds for my dog to hear my command and react).&nbsp; This is probably a dumb question, but i'm just curious, and i don't think it will take any research from many of you here, or much typing. So my question is, can temerature affect time?&nbsp;&nbsp;I was thinking of an experiment, although i'm sure it isn't the best experiment, but i came up with it after a few other ideas and decided it was the best i was going to come up with.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Okay, say you set up 2 vaccuums of equal sizes, say a few miles(50). Would a sound, say an air horn sound(i don't think decibels matter), that were let off at the same time, reach the opposite side at the same time as the other if one temperature was really high, say 500 degrees farenheit, and the other&nbsp; was very low, like -200 degrees.I'm not sure if temp. affects the speed of sound(and if it can then maybe even the speed of light?) or if it can also/instead be applied to time, if in fact they are affected by temperature.So, is this bad joke totally implausible? Thanks <br />Posted by TranquilChaos</DIV><br /><br />In a true vacuum, there is no temperature. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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observer7

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<p>&nbsp;So my question is, can temerature affect time?&nbsp;</p><p>My thoughts.&nbsp; First you have to define time (a non-trivial exercise).&nbsp; I take your question to mean "Perceived Time" in the sense of how you experience the passing of time.&nbsp; In this case temperature can certainly have an effect on time, because at lower temps your body slows down.&nbsp; As temps get really cold and hypothermia sets in you feel sleepy, can't focus, and several minutes can go by that seems like seconds. &nbsp;</p><p>Now is there any physical effect on time caused by temperature?&nbsp; Time is always measured by clocks.&nbsp; So insofar as these devises are effected by temp then "time" is also effected.&nbsp; But the problem is that time is just not something we can put our hands on.&nbsp; It is always the result of a change in state compared to another "static" state.&nbsp; Big E got it right when he called it the Theory of Relativity! </p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp; Okay, say you set up 2 vaccuums of equal sizes, say a few miles(50). Would a sound, say an air horn sound(i don't think decibels matter), that were let off at the same time, reach the opposite side at the same time as the other if one temperature was really high, say 500 degrees farenheit, and the other&nbsp; was very low, like -200 degrees.</p><p>&nbsp;Sound does not travel through a vaccuum (sic).&nbsp; I believe the tempurature of a medium (such as regular old air) does have an effect on the speed of sound.&nbsp; But this again is an example of using a "clock" (in this case the duration of the propagation of a wave through a medium) to judge time. </p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>So, is this bad joke totally implausible? </p><p>No, most bad jokes are based on the implausible.&nbsp; That's what makes them bad!</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>-- </p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <em><font size="2">"Time exists so that everything doesn't happen at once" </font></em><font size="2">Albert Einstein</font> </div>
 
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kg

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>(and if it can then maybe even the speed of light?) or if it can also/instead be applied to time, if in fact they are affected by temperature.<br />Posted by TranquilChaos</DIV><br /><br />What if you use an atomic clock?&nbsp; Would temperature make a difference in a radioisotopes half life?&nbsp; If you had one sample near absolute zero and the other sample near absolute... Hey? is there an absolute high temperature?&nbsp;&nbsp;
 
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yevaud

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>What if you use an atomic clock?&nbsp; Would temperature make a difference in a radioisotopes half life?&nbsp; If you had one sample near absolute zero and the other sample near absolute... Hey? is there an absolute high temperature?&nbsp;&nbsp; </p><p> Posted by <em>kg</em></DIV></p><p>As near as we know, the closest thing to an Absolute Temperature are the temperatures found during the Big Bang, at which all four forces unify.</p><p>Of course, the drawback to this experiment is you'd have to recreate the Big Bang. </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Differential Diagnosis:  </em>"<strong><em>I am both amused and annoyed that you think I should be less stubborn than you are</em></strong>."<br /> </p> </div>
 
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kg

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>As near as we know, the closest thing to an Absolute Temperature are the temperatures found during the Big Bang, at which all four forces unify.Of course, the drawback to this experiment is you'd have to recreate the Big Bang. <br />Posted by yevaud</DIV><br /><br />Ok, sorry about the unrelated question.&nbsp; If one sample of a radioisotope was kept at near absolute zero and the other was very very hot... would&nbsp;there be a difference in&nbsp;their half lives?
 
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DrRocket

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Ok, sorry about the unrelated question.&nbsp; If one sample of a radioisotope was kept at near absolute zero and the other was very very hot... would&nbsp;there be a difference in&nbsp;their half lives? <br />Posted by kg</DIV></p><p>I would think not.&nbsp; Temperature is a statistical concept, but is basically governed by the electromagnetic force, interactions among electrically charged particles.&nbsp; Radioactive decay is governed by the strong and weak nuclear forces.&nbsp;In the limiting case the Yevaud raised, near the big bang when all forces are thought to have been unified and active, I dunno.&nbsp; </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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a_lost_packet_

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I was thinking something earlier(a joke about it was so cold there that it took my dog 2 seconds for my dog to hear my command and react).&nbsp; This is probably a dumb question, but i'm just curious, and i don't think it will take any research from many of you here, or much typing. So my question is, can temerature affect time?&nbsp;&nbsp;I was thinking of an experiment, although i'm sure it isn't the best experiment, but i came up with it after a few other ideas and decided it was the best i was going to come up with.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Okay, say you set up 2 vaccuums of equal sizes, say a few miles(50). Would a sound, say an air horn sound(i don't think decibels matter), that were let off at the same time, reach the opposite side at the same time as the other if one temperature was really high, say 500 degrees farenheit, and the other&nbsp; was very low, like -200 degrees.I'm not sure if temp. affects the speed of sound(and if it can then maybe even the speed of light?) or if it can also/instead be applied to time, if in fact they are affected by temperature.So, is this bad joke totally implausible? Thanks Posted by TranquilChaos</DIV></p><p>First, define temperature.</p><p>Temperature is commonly the amount of energetic movement of molecules in a given medium.&nbsp; (Atoms too, depending on the medium measured.)&nbsp; If there is no medium, there isn't any temperature.&nbsp; But, there's still "Activity" according to most physics.</p><p>Temp can affect the speed of sound.&nbsp; It also can effect the speed of light but not because temperature has a direct effect on "light" simply on the medium it is transmitted through.&nbsp; That's the same reason it has an effect on sound - It effects the medium of transmission.&nbsp; If you froze froze "air" or, as a better example, water and then transmitted sound through it, what would happen?&nbsp; Well, it would propogate quicker - the molecules are closer together, facilitating the transmission of the vibrations of "sound."&nbsp; Sound only really exists as a matter of perception.&nbsp; There's no such thing as "sound" without an ear to hear it.&nbsp; It's just vibrations. </p><p>Does temperature effect time?&nbsp; No.&nbsp; (At least, depending on how you define temperature.)&nbsp; But, it does effect the medium it is "measured" by.&nbsp; So, if you only use one measurement to define time, let's say the movment of molecules or atoms, then you may think time has stopped.&nbsp; But, there are a great many contrary measurements which could falsify that.&nbsp;&nbsp; Atomic decay is one. </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font size="1">I put on my robe and wizard hat...</font> </div>
 
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DrRocket

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>First, define temperature.Posted by a_lost_packet_</DIV></p><p>Your explanation is a good one.&nbsp; Perhaps a fundamental definition of temperature will help.</p><p>Temperature is only defined for a system in thermodynamic equlibrium. For such as system temperature is, to within a constant multiple, the average kinetic energy of translation of the molecules (you do not count the energy associated with other modes such as roation about axes).&nbsp; Internal energy is the average&nbsp;energy of the molelcules, including all modes.&nbsp; <br /><br />http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temperature</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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