Relativity Calculator

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neutrino78x

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check out this web site, if you put in a given speed of light factor, say 0.99, for 0.99 * c, it will tell you what the lorentz contraction factor is. Or you can enter a factor and it will tell you how fast you would have to go to see that result.

Relativity Calculator

--Brian
 
H

HopDavid

Guest
This is shameless self promotion but I'm hoping folks will find this spreadsheet useful:

http://clowder.net/hop/railroad/Hohmann.xls

You type in departure and destination planets. You also type altitudes for apoapsis and periapsis for orbits around departure and destination orbits

It gives you launch windows, trip time, delta V and a few other things.

Most of the sheet exept for input cells is locked. This was to keep myself from accidentally overwriting needed cells. However there is an unlocked blue region a user can use for scratch paper. This is to the right of the delta V section.
 
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neutrino78x

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This is one of my favorite web sites to randomly browse:

Atomic Rocket.

Click on the drop down list at the top of the page (it says -Choose-).

All kinds of categories to read. :)

Engine List provides data for various types of rocket engines, VASIMR, nuclear thermal, etc.

There is tons of information on here...you could be occupied for hours checking it out :)

--Brian
 
E

EarthlingX

Guest
HopDavid":30by9rbn said:
This is shameless self promotion but I'm hoping folks will find this spreadsheet useful:

http://clowder.net/hop/railroad/Hohmann.xls

You type in departure and destination planets. You also type altitudes for apoapsis and periapsis for orbits around departure and destination orbits

It gives you launch windows, trip time, delta V and a few other things.

Most of the sheet exept for input cells is locked. This was to keep myself from accidentally overwriting needed cells. However there is an unlocked blue region a user can use for scratch paper. This is to the right of the delta V section.
Nice one :) I, for one, find it useful :cool:

neutrino78x":30by9rbn said:
This is one of my favorite web sites to randomly browse:

Atomic Rocket.

Click on the drop down list at the top of the page (it says -Choose-).

All kinds of categories to read. :)

Engine List provides data for various types of rocket engines, VASIMR, nuclear thermal, etc.

There is tons of information on here...you could be occupied for hours checking it out :)

--Brian
I was, i was ;) Very nice site, a bit dated at some parts, might be said slightly partial towards nuclear propulsion, but worth checking and good source for information on many things.
 
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EarthlingX

Guest
You find something, that is handy, don't hesitate to drop it in ;)
 
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EarthlingX

Guest
Very handy, thanks to :
MeteorWayne":9xis7rdh said:
One easily accessible tool is to use the jpl sbdb browser. I'll select an asteroid to get you to the starting point.

http://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/sbdb.cgi?sstr=2 ... ;cad=0#orb

The handle on the right changes the tilt, you can bring it up to align it with the plane of the earth. Move it down and you get an overhead view. To see it move hit the >> arrow.

At the bottom is a handle for zoom (It's not the one right below the orbit diagram...it's further down and labeled Zoom)
so you can close in to just look at Mercury if you want.
I will also drop this in, and get it done with, for the moment :
Wiki : Celestia

Home : http://shatters.net/celestia/
Download : http://shatters.net/celestia/download.html

Recommended add-on page, after official - you can find more files on ESA and NASA usually on the respective mission pages :
Selden's List of Resources for Celestia

Missions with files, which i remember without much searching are Mars Express, Cassini, Messenger. I can check for direct file links, if anyone is interested.

Most of the space observatories have at least some basic orbital info, in other words, heavy traffic.

Huge amount of asteroids, NEOs, comets, moons, space-craft, it can keep you busy for a while, but later, it is just updating, not that bad. (yea, i will get to it :roll: )

You can see some of Celestia images here, plus free software links, some might be a bit advanced, not images though :
SDC, SB&T : Virtual space tech
 
E

EarthlingX

Guest
Posting help for this forum :

BBCode Guide
What is BBCode?
BBCode is a special implementation of HTML. Whether you can actually use BBCode in your posts on the forum is determined by the administrator. In addition you can disable BBCode on a per post basis via the posting form. BBCode itself is similar in style to HTML, tags are enclosed in square brackets [ and ] rather than < and > and it offers greater control over what and how something is displayed. Depending on the template you are using you may find adding BBCode to your posts is made much easier through a clickable interface above the message area on the posting form. Even with this you may find the following guide useful.
Next thing you need to know are those square things above posting area, with writing on them, let's call them 'buttons'.
They 'tag' the text you selected.
Example :
-
Code:
http://www.somesite.com/image.jpg

becomes

[img]http://www.somesite.com/image.jpg[/img]
Properly posting URLs is a bit trickier, but with a lot of practice, dedication and keyboard study, you will be able to do this:

to make text :
Very Fancy Web Title

point, or redirect browser to address :
www.owgawdwhatasite.com


Here's the trickery :

- Select text to convert to link
- click on the URL button
- insert '=' sign after 'url' at the beginning of the tag
- insert address after '=' sign
Like this :

Code:
Very Fancy Web Title

[url]Very Fancy Web Title[/url]

[url=]Very Fancy Web Title[/url]

[url=http://www.owgawdwhatasite.com/]Very Fancy Web Title[/url]
It is much less trouble with YouTube videos :

Code:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MIaORknS1Dk

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MIaORknS1Dk[/youtube]
If you see some post you like, you can press 'quote' on the post and have all the insides you can handle visible.

Oh, and press 'Preview', at the bottom of posting area, at least once ;)
 
J

James_Bull

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EarthlingX":1s3wpjzv said:
Here is another calculator for spinning space habitats :
http://www.artificial-gravity.com/sw/Sp ... inCalc.htm

NASA site with a lot of math, equations and JAVA calculators:
http://exploration.grc.nasa.gov/educati ... hortr.html

Cheers they're amazing links!
Worked out that if you connected 2 modules (bigalow inflatable BA330's of course) together rotating around a central point (the nuclear reactor + multi-megaWatt VASIMR's)..... you'd need a diameter of about ~500meters for 1G or ~250m for 0.5G
Assuming a max rotating speed of 2rpm, although at 3rpm a more realistic 200m diameter would be sufficient for 1G. Ow my head...
 
E

EarthlingX

Guest
For the collection, from Spacex Falcon 9 Flight 2 COTS -1 Launch :

docm":2jbxh2a6 said:
Depends on what its terminal velocity in dense air is. Once that's reached more altitude doesn't matter as long as the 'chutes have time to open, and for a hollow, blunt object that could be a lot slower than you'd think.

Anyone who wants to speculate about it can plug their mass, Cd, blunt-end surface area etc. guesstimates into this terminal velocity calculator -

http://www.calctool.org/CALC/eng/aerospace/terminal

My ghost says <250 mph. Skydivers rarely exceed 130 mph in a flat position, and they aren't hollow.
This site has also other calculators.
 
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EarthlingX

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