Satrs and Planets

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fireball20

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I was just wondering what star formations and planets can we see right now?
 
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bbk1

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Is it possible to view the Milky Way via a 4.5" Telescope or does one need to have a more powerful scope?<br />
 
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bbk1

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Sorry, I'm confused <img src="/images/icons/rolleyes.gif" /><br /><br />Was I supposed to find the answer to my question in the link you supplied?
 
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Saiph

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It's possible to see the milky way with the naked eye. Find Cygnus (a.k.a. the northern cross). The milky way runs right through it (the cross is basically situated parrallel to it as well). You'll need pretty dark skies to pick it out, it'll look like a cloud (a common mistake).<br /><br />If you use a pair of binoculars, or small scope, and you sweep across it you'll notice a large increase in stars compared to elsewhere. If you aim towards sagittarius the increase is quite noticable. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p align="center"><font color="#c0c0c0"><br /></font></p><p align="center"><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">--------</font></em></font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">--------</font></em></font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">----</font></em></font><font color="#666699">SaiphMOD@gmail.com </font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">-------------------</font></em></font></p><p><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">"This is my Timey Wimey Detector.  Goes "bing" when there's stuff.  It also fries eggs at 30 paces, wether you want it to or not actually.  I've learned to stay away from hens: It's not pretty when they blow" -- </font></em></font><font size="1" color="#999999">The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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bbk1

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Thanks saiph<br /><br />Looks like I'm going to have to get hold of a skymap chart. That may help. I do have a fairly powerful binocular but I rarely use it. I always end up with neck pain every time I use it.<br /><br />My question of "is it possible to view the Milky Way Galaxy using a small 4.5" Telescope" still stand. <br /><br />I'm just wondering did anyone here have that opportunity of viewing a Galaxy on their scope!!!<br /><br /><br />
 
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Saiph

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I've viewed many galaxies with a telescope, quasars amongst them (can't get any further than that!). <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p align="center"><font color="#c0c0c0"><br /></font></p><p align="center"><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">--------</font></em></font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">--------</font></em></font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">----</font></em></font><font color="#666699">SaiphMOD@gmail.com </font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">-------------------</font></em></font></p><p><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">"This is my Timey Wimey Detector.  Goes "bing" when there's stuff.  It also fries eggs at 30 paces, wether you want it to or not actually.  I've learned to stay away from hens: It's not pretty when they blow" -- </font></em></font><font size="1" color="#999999">The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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raven2490

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When are jupiter and saturn be visible again on the northeast ? saturn and jupiter are too far down the horizon around sundown and thats the only time the sky chart saids they r visible <img src="/images/icons/frown.gif" />
 
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bbk1

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Saturn will be visible in the Northeast sky at around 2 AM toward the end of next September.<br /><br />Jupiter will start to show up toward the end of this December and begining of 2005, a couple of hours past midnight.<br /><br />Depending on your location, there might be an hour or so difference.
 
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raven2490

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Thanx alot for the info bbk1 .. really appreciate it <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" />
 
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CalliArcale

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<blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr /><p>My question of "is it possible to view the Milky Way Galaxy using a small 4.5" Telescope" still stand.<br /><br />I'm just wondering did anyone here have that opportunity of viewing a Galaxy on their scope!!!<p><hr /></p></p></blockquote><br /><br />Yes, you can view the Milky Way with a small telescope. In fact, the smaller the better -- the Milky Way is easily the biggest object in the night sky (comprised of most of the other objects in the night sky, technically) and with a powerful telescope, all you'll really see is a dense starfield. Binoculars would be a good choice. With your telescope, use the lowest magnification you've got.<br /><br />The best experience of the Milky Way, however, requires no equipment at all. It is best viewed with the naked eye. Go to a dark place, well away from city lights, during summer in the northern hemisphere. You can't miss it. It looks like a milky expanse stretching from horizon to horizon. The brightest, densest part (towards Sagitarrius) is the galactic center. I cannot see it from my back yard, though -- the city lights eradicate it. Knowing where it is, I can point my telescope and see dense starfields, but to really see the Milky Way, I have to drive miles away. It is truly spectacular, and well worth the trip. <br /><br />EDIT: If you want to see another galaxy, Andromeda is a good target. Again, use low magnification. Binoculars might actually be a better bet. Andromeda is hard to see with the naked eye because it is faint, but it covers more of the night sky than the Moon does. You will find it in (of course) the constellation Andromeda. It is the nearest large galaxy. I haven't tried observing any other galaxies yet with my own 130mm Newtonian (which is about the size of your scope). I have seen the Whirlpool Galaxy through my father's 8" Schmidt-Cassegrain. The real beauty of all of these structures, however, comes in delayed-exposure images to bring out the <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><font color="#666699"><em>"People assume that time is a strict progression of cause to effect, but actually from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint it's more like a big ball of wibbly wobbly . . . timey wimey . . . stuff."</em>  -- The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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