Since we don't know how big the universe is, how is it determined that the Universe is 67% Dark Energy?

Jun 23, 2020
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The Universe is so large we dont know its true size. Given that, how can we categorically state that the Universe is 67% Dark Energy?
 

Catastrophe

The devil is in the detail
Hawkstein "I imagine it's just an extrapolation of the observable universe".

I agree. A question of sampling - you can say that the salt content of the Pacific Ocean is x% by taking samples, but (Mauricer) please say where your comment using the word "categorically" came from. Any such statement has to be based on sampling and is indicative rather than categorical.
 
Dark energy was created the same day they discovered the universe was expanding faster and faster.
A simply reason for the expansion but also a problematic one that creates new energy to do what they think it's doing.
IMO dark energy/matter is temporary particle creation from quantum fluctuation.
The reason the universe is accelerating faster and faster is the rest of our neighbor universes gravity influence is now greater than our universe self gravity.
Easy solution that breaks no energy creation laws. :)
 
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Catastrophe

The devil is in the detail
The question was . . . . . . . . .
"Since we don't know how big the universe is, how is it determined that the Universe is 67% Dark Energy?"

That is of course a very valid question, but it presupposes that we think we know how big the Universe is, which of course we do not know. Without getting into one of those nasty ( :) ) "infinity" discussions it is of course the meaning of the question - how do we determine the relative size of dark matter in the known Universe.
Does that get us any further? Maybe not?
But it, at least, puts the question on a rational basis.

So, what is the answer?

Cat :)
 
The question was . . . . . . . . .
"Since we don't know how big the universe is, how is it determined that the Universe is 67% Dark Energy?"

That is of course a very valid question, but it presupposes that we think we know how big the Universe is, which of course we do not know. Without getting into one of those nasty ( :) ) "infinity" discussions it is of course the meaning of the question - how do we determine the relative size of dark matter in the known Universe.
Does that get us any further? Maybe not?
But it, at least, puts the question on a rational basis.

So, what is the answer?

Cat :)
I think the universe is 100% dark energy and matter.
Or quantum fluctuation temp energy/matter
The big bang not so much as a product of an E balance.

JMO but i think all the years we have been looking at the universe as the big bang and i think the universe is the fluctuation and it's E balance products.
Reason for the increased speed could be as simple as internal gravity of the big bang now less internal gravity than the neighbors universes gravity influence.
Dark energy creating new energy and having an expanding force, or external gravity.
One solution breaks no laws the other ?
 

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