sun surface too hot

Status
Not open for further replies.
A

annagiulia

Guest
<p>With reference to the article published on Marc 24, 2008:</p><p>Heath decreases when energy leaves a surface, as generally said.&nbsp;&nbsp; Magnetic flow caousing auroras on Earth is energy emitted by the Sun.&nbsp;&nbsp; </p><p>So, how&nbsp;great is the energy loss in the eleven years cycle of sun activity,&nbsp;caused by&nbsp;emissions related to auroras on our planet?&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Is there some fixed relation between the magnitude and frequence of terrestrial&nbsp;auroras and energy loss in the sun?&nbsp;&nbsp; Has this loss its counterpart as a relative, or temporary reduction of heath at the sun surface, if any?</p><p>Thank in advance to everyone can explain me these questions.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> annagiulia </div>
 
O

origin

Guest
<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>With reference to the article published on Marc 24, 2008:Heath decreases when energy leaves a surface, as generally said.&nbsp;&nbsp; Magnetic flow caousing auroras on Earth is energy emitted by the Sun.&nbsp;&nbsp; So, how&nbsp;great is the energy loss in the eleven years cycle of sun activity,&nbsp;caused by&nbsp;emissions related to auroras on our planet?&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Is there some fixed relation between the magnitude and frequence of terrestrial&nbsp;auroras and energy loss in the sun?&nbsp;&nbsp; Has this loss its counterpart as a relative, or temporary reduction of heath at the sun surface, if any?Thank in advance to everyone can explain me these questions. <br />Posted by annagiulia</DIV></p><p>The aurora is caused by charged particles from the sun and not heat per se.&nbsp; The 11 year sunspot cycle influences the auroras because the higher the number of sunspots the higher the number of CMDs which drive large auroral displays.&nbsp; The cycle does influence the heat output of the sun but that is not the driving force of the auroras.</p><p><br /><br />&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
M

michaelmozina

Guest
<p>The earth's aurora are caused by the flow of charged particles from the sun passing through the earth's fixed magnectic field.&nbsp; It creates a form of induction that leads to electrical activity in the aurora.&nbsp; As the sun's 11 year cycle hits it active peak, the sun spews out more CME's and more charged particle bursts, some of which can hit the earth and create powerful electromagnetic storms.&nbsp; The greater the number of sunspots, the greater activity that can be seen in the x-ray and gamma ray spectrums in Hinode and Rhessi images, and the greater amount of overall energy that is released from the sun.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Sunspots are always associated with high energy emisisons that can be seen in SOHO and TRACE 171A images, as well as Hinode x-ray images.</p><p>&nbsp;Not surprisingly, when we compare the sunspot cycle to ocean temperatures on earth, the greater the number of sunspots, the higher the ocean temperatures here on earth.&nbsp; The active phase of the sun coincides with a noticable increase in energy output, and a noticeable increae in high energy emissions. </p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> It seems to be a natural consequence of our points of view to assume that the whole of space is filled with electrons and flying electric ions of all kinds. - Kristian Birkeland </div>
 
A

annagiulia

Guest
<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>The earth's aurora are caused by the flow of charged particles from the sun passing through the earth's fixed magnectic field.&nbsp; It creates a form of induction that leads to electrical activity in the aurora.&nbsp; As the sun's 11 year cycle hits it active peak, the sun spews out more CME's and more charged particle bursts, some of which can hit the earth and create powerful electromagnetic storms.&nbsp; The greater the number of sunspots, the greater activity that can be seen in the x-ray and gamma ray spectrums in Hinode and Rhessi images, and the greater amount of overall energy that is released from the sun.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Sunspots are always associated with high energy emisisons that can be seen in SOHO and TRACE 171A images, as well as Hinode x-ray images.&nbsp;Not surprisingly, when we compare the sunspot cycle to ocean temperatures on earth, the greater the number of sunspots, the higher the ocean temperatures here on earth.&nbsp; The active phase of the sun coincides with a noticable increase in energy output, and a noticeable increae in high energy emissions. &nbsp;&nbsp; <br />Posted by michaelmozina</DIV></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Thank You for this exhaustive explanation! Annagiulia<br /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> annagiulia </div>
 
C

CalliArcale

Guest
<p>The actual mechanism of the glowing aurora is the same as in a flourescent light bulb, or a neon sign.&nbsp; Different colors are produced by different chemicals in the upper atmosphere as the Sun's charged particles excite them.&nbsp; If I recall correctly, oxygen and nitrogen are the main culprits, with one producing a green glow and one producing the rarer red glow.&nbsp; The red glow occurs at lower altitudes, so you only see it if the flow of charged particles is strong enough to penetrate that low.&nbsp; That happens fairly often at high latitudes, where the Earth's magnetic field concentrates the flow, but sometimes even at lower latitudes.&nbsp; It is predicted that during the Earth's next magnetic pole shift, red aurora will occur commonly at very low latitudes.</p><p>The aurora is a beautiful thing, seeming alive as it twists and ripples across the sky.&nbsp; This is because the magnetic field is constantly moving.&nbsp; Michael described it as fixed and at a large scale it is -- north is north and south is south, and so the aurorae are always centered around the magnetic poles.&nbsp; But at a small scale, it is constantly moving and changing.&nbsp; When there is aurora, you can *see* it, and it is indescribably beautiful. </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><font color="#666699"><em>"People assume that time is a strict progression of cause to effect, but actually from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint it's more like a big ball of wibbly wobbly . . . timey wimey . . . stuff."</em>  -- The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
D

dix

Guest
I'm new to the forum.&nbsp; Just wanted to say I'm watching a great documentary on Discovery Science right now called Our Secret Sun.&nbsp; Lots of very good close-up video from SOHO.&nbsp; Totally awe inspiring. Worth a watch :)
 
B

bearack

Guest
Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I'm new to the forum.&nbsp; Just wanted to say I'm watching a great documentary on Discovery Science right now called Our Secret Sun.&nbsp; Lots of very good close-up video from SOHO.&nbsp; Totally awe inspiring. Worth a watch :) <br />Posted by dix</DIV><br /><br />Welcome to the forums.&nbsp; Hopefully they will re-air the program.&nbsp; Sounds like it could be good. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><br /><img id="06322a8d-f18d-4ab1-8ea7-150275a4cb53" src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/6/14/06322a8d-f18d-4ab1-8ea7-150275a4cb53.Large.jpg" alt="blog post photo" /></p> </div>
 
A

annagiulia

Guest
<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>The actual mechanism of the glowing aurora is the same as in a flourescent light bulb, or a neon sign.&nbsp; Different colors are produced by different chemicals in the upper atmosphere as the Sun's charged particles excite them.&nbsp; If I recall correctly, oxygen and nitrogen are the main culprits, with one producing a green glow and one producing the rarer red glow.&nbsp; The red glow occurs at lower altitudes, so you only see it if the flow of charged particles is strong enough to penetrate that low.&nbsp; That happens fairly often at high latitudes, where the Earth's magnetic field concentrates the flow, but sometimes even at lower latitudes.&nbsp; It is predicted that during the Earth's next magnetic pole shift, red aurora will occur commonly at very low latitudes.The aurora is a beautiful thing, seeming alive as it twists and ripples across the sky.&nbsp; This is because the magnetic field is constantly moving.&nbsp; Michael described it as fixed and at a large scale it is -- north is north and south is south, and so the aurorae are always centered around the magnetic poles.&nbsp; But at a small scale, it is constantly moving and changing.&nbsp; When there is aurora, you can *see* it, and it is indescribably beautiful. <br />Posted by CalliArcale</DIV><br /><br />Hi,</p><p>The following link is to thank forum's participants for all informations: it is the impressive picture of a red aurora seen in Varese, Italy (<font size="2"><font size="1">42 50 N, 12 50</font> <font size="1">E</font>: </font>the town where I work, but I did not observe it, I regret) in 2001 and photographed at the local astronomic observatory:</p><p>http://www.astrogeo.va.it/astronom/aurora/aurora.htm</p><p>Please, open it, and enjoy!</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> annagiulia </div>
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

ASK THE COMMUNITY