The Cosmic Vortex

Status
Not open for further replies.
S

scipt

Guest
My Uncle (Gordon Langshow) recently posted a theory of his on the Royal Astronomical Society website. However, it's very slow on replies there... thought i might let you guys have a look over it. Original link -http://www.ras.org.uk/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=85<br /><br />THE COSMIC VORTEX <br />~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ <br /><br />INTRODUCTION <br /><br />The cosmic model described by the Big Bang Theory has been widely accepted by scientists as an accurate description of the structure and evolution of our universe. This theory has remained unchallenged for over half a century but I would like to change this by proposing an alternative I am sure will convince you otherwise. The truth is, we are not in an expanding universe originating from a single point in space but quite the opposite - WE ARE GOING THE OTHER WAY. <br /><br />FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPALS <br /><br />At first glance you may think this idea has no standing since it has already been established that galaxies in the observable universe are moving away from us in all directions. Measurements of their red shift in the visible spectrum indicate the further away the galaxies are, the faster they are receding. On the evidence presented, it comes as no surprise that scientists have adopted the idea that we exist within an expanding universe. <br /><br />If this is your view of the Universe, I urge you to consider the following scenario: <br /><br />Imagine that the universe is an immense sphere of matter and energy. At its centre is a massive singularity, into which all matter is being drawn by the forces of gravity. Next, I want you to visualise a line of travel from the outer edge of this Universe to its centre. To an observer located at a central point on this trajectory, matter will appear to be moving away when viewed in the direction of the singularity, the recessional speed being directly proportional to the recessional distance. Likewise the observer will be moving away from matter on the opposite side of the line of travel, aga <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
V

vogon13

Guest
Differential rela-static shrinkage has already been discussed here.<br /><br /><br /><br />Btw, welcome to Uplink.<br /><br /><br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#ff0000"><strong>TPTB went to Dallas and all I got was Plucked !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#339966"><strong>So many people, so few recipes !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#0000ff"><strong>Let's clean up this stinkhole !!</strong></font> </p> </div>
 
D

derekmcd

Guest
How would you go about explain that galaxies in ALL directions are expanding away from us. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div> </div><br /><div><span style="color:#0000ff" class="Apple-style-span">"If something's hard to do, then it's not worth doing." - Homer Simpson</span></div> </div>
 
V

vogon13

Guest
We're shrinking faster than they are approaching.<br /><br />It makes them look like they are receding.<br /><br /><br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#ff0000"><strong>TPTB went to Dallas and all I got was Plucked !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#339966"><strong>So many people, so few recipes !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#0000ff"><strong>Let's clean up this stinkhole !!</strong></font> </p> </div>
 
K

kmarinas86

Guest
To be consisent with observations, there has to be mutiple singularities.
 
D

derekmcd

Guest
Shrinking?<br /><br />I understand the 'line of sight' deal. Straight ahead and 180 degrees behind... I can see how the perception of expansion can be explained via different speeds and acceleration based on your distance to the "center". But what about object that are NOT in the line of sight... say 90 degrees right and left. If anything, we would see them blue shifted as we would be the same distance from the center, but are both closing in on the center of the vortex.<br /><br />Make sense? Picture a flushing toilet... <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div> </div><br /><div><span style="color:#0000ff" class="Apple-style-span">"If something's hard to do, then it's not worth doing." - Homer Simpson</span></div> </div>
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

ASK THE COMMUNITY