The universe is loosing heat

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rocketrunner

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Do you think the reason that the universe is loosing heat because the whole universe is expanding not that it actually loosing heat. It just that its the same heat just has a tuff time of geting to all of the empty space, since of the expansion in deep space. Like a room with a match if you put a match in your hand it will burn your hand, but if you put the same match with the same heat in a bigger room you wont feel the heat. Well anyway thats my question or statement.
 
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vogon13

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The mass and energy of the universe is dissipating into infinity and eternity.<br /><br />The solution to existence is dilution.<br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#ff0000"><strong>TPTB went to Dallas and all I got was Plucked !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#339966"><strong>So many people, so few recipes !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#0000ff"><strong>Let's clean up this stinkhole !!</strong></font> </p> </div>
 
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rfoshaug

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Think about all those stars radiating their energy into nothingness. A lot of that light (and heat and other wavelengths of radiation) will never hit anything on its way through the galaxies and into the infinity beyond, and will be lost from our universe.<br /><br />If anything has escape velocity from the universe itself, it must be light. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#ff9900">----------------------------------</font></p><p><font color="#ff9900">My minds have many opinions</font></p> </div>
 
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nexium

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I guess neither of you subconsciously accept that the the universe has no boundry? If no boundry, then every speck of matter or it's equivent energy is in the Universe that was here 13 billion years ago. We have more photons even though a few are trapped inside black holes: The small increase in photon count is spread over a much larger volume, reducing the average temperature. Neil
 
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kmarinas86

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<font color="yellow">Do you think the reason that the universe is loosing heat because the whole universe is expanding not that it actually loosing heat. It just that its the same heat just has a tuff time of geting to all of the empty space, since of the expansion in deep space. Like a room with a match if you put a match in your hand it will burn your hand, but if you put the same match with the same heat in a bigger room you wont feel the heat. Well anyway thats my question or statement.</font><br /><br />If you have a light collecting area of a sphere of about<br /><br />4*pi*(13.7 billion light years)^2<br />which is<br />2.3585821 * 10^21 square light years<br /><br />Then you could concievably collect all of the light that is being emitted from the galaxies.<br /><br />However, the big bang theory is more complicated than that, with the furthest "comoving" distance being much greater than 30 billion light years.<br /><br />The only thing I could imagine with such a huge "gross" surface area would be the surface area of black holes which are a billions of times of wider and a billion times heavier than the largest known quasars - that is to say billions of light years across. IF there are no such objects (objects which run against the cosmological prinicple).... the universe will die of heat.<br /><br />It is more likely, by chance, that we live in a eternal universe. The simple matter of probability states that we are infinitely more likely to live in an eternal universe than in one that is temporary and finite, since the eternal universe will have an infinite number of births where as the finite mortal one will have a finite number of births.<br /><br />For the universe to be infinite, it must follow that the cosmological principle be wrong and that all the radiation and particulate matter emitted by smaller objects (atoms and planets) is bounded by yet larger objects (stars, blackholes, galaxies, clusters, and, by requirement, <i>the larger yet</i>). Such a u
 
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newtonian

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rocketrunner - are you sure the universe is losing heat?<br /><br />I read in Scientific American that the universe is heating up. <br /><br />Excuse me while I search for that article.<br /><br />Meanwhile, the laws of thermodynamics would cause uniform temperature IF our universe is a closed system thermodynamically -= but this does not take into account supernova frequency, for one example.<br /><br />I.e. Matter into energy. If matter is converted into energy faster than energy into matter, then the universe should gain in temperature - though as another poster correctly noted - this is being thinned out due to expansion.<br /><br />Remember the law of conservation of matter and energy and the laws of thermodynamics!<br /><br />Need I mention entropy?
 
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newtonian

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rocketrunner - OK, I found the article: Scientific American, 10/02, page 59 and surrounding pages.<br /><br />From page 59 evidence is shown through spectral analysis of quasar light of a Lyman-alpha forest of spectral lines caused by ionized hydrogen. If the universe’s IGM was more than one part per million neutral hydrogen, the spectal lines would overlap such that instead of a forest of separate lines their would be a trough of overlapping lines. This means that early on after the CMBR was caused in a cooled off universe of some thousands of Kelvins the IGM was reheated to millions of Kelvins where it is now!<br /><br />See the article for more details - or ask me to post on this later - now I must go to sleep and work all day tomorrow.<br /><br />[still awake - this is fascinating:]<br /><br />There is a fascinating graph of IGM temperature change during the universes history on page 62.<br /><br />It involves three dramatic transitions, the first being the well known recombination transition that gave rise to the CMBR.<br /><br />The main point is that galactic clusters are hotter than ever in the history of the universe after the big bang and getting hotter. And the IGM as a whole is slighty cooling but still extremely hot after being reheated to pre-recombination heat by reionization!<br /><br />Could cluster outflow have anything to do with acceleration of expansion????<br /><br />The other two dramatic transitions are reionization transition and heating transition - the latter being extreme and caused apparently by millions of kelvins outflow from galactic clusters.
 
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