The universe's clock might have bigger ticks than we imagine

rod

Oct 22, 2019
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My note. An important statement about this new model for time is in the report. "While verifying that such a fundamental unit of time exists is beyond our current technological capabilities, it is more accessible than previous proposals, such as the Planck time, the researchers said in their paper. Derived from fundamental constants, the Planck time would set the tiniest measurable ticks at 10^(minus 44) seconds, or a ten-thousandth of a billionth of a billionth of a billionth of a billionth of a billionth of a second, according to Universe Today."

The report points out problems between QM and GR definition of time. "But certain objects — like black holes, which condense enormous mass into an inconceivably tiny space — can't be fully described without a theory of everything known as quantum gravity."

The QM definition of time and GR definition of time do not play together. Presently, no test using the empirical world confirms the model of time reported here because *verifying that such a fundamental unit of time exists is beyond our current technological capabilities*. There is no empirical world test(s) that demonstrates quantum gravity is real either (e.g. graviton field or graviton particles). The QM model used to explain the origin of the universe in BB cosmology today (e.g. repulsive gravity, 3D space expanding > 1E+20 c velocity) cannot be called *natural law* explanations like we see for Newton's laws of motion, the laws of Thermodynamics, law of gravity, or Kepler's planetary laws based upon elliptical orbits.
 
Jul 19, 2020
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Wouldn't 10^(-44) be one hundredth of a millionth of a billionth of a billionth of a billionth of a billionth?

"ten-thousandth of a billionth of a billionth of a billionth of a billionth of a billionth" is 10^(-49)

I figure that each billionth is equal to 9 decimal places (since 1 billion = 10^9), and there is five of them, so that's 45 decimal places, plus the ten-thousandth is four more.
 

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