Todays Link about Space and Liquid

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evilellis2

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odysseus145

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<blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr /><p>Its nice to see that my earlyer post seems to be getting proved.<p><hr /></p></p></blockquote><br />I saw no evidence that your theory is being proven. Here is the <b>major</b> flaw in your theory:<br /><br />Liquids are a form of matter.<br /><br />Matter is made of atoms.<br /><br />Space has no atoms.<br /><br />Ergo, a liquid it is not. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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nexium

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In most respects, space behaves like a very good vaccum. In other respects, space behave like an extremely thin gas or an extremely thin plasma. I hesitate to say; nothing like a liquid. Perhaps we should analyze the liquid thing more carefully. Atoms are rare in space, but we should not say space has no atoms, as one atom will pass though tiny samples of space eventually and larger samples almost always have one or more atoms passing through. An ion can be considered an atom with an electrical charge. Neil
 
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igorsboss

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Liquids flow, and when they do, they are called fluids. If space is a liquid, then it should be possible to show that space flows as a fluid.<br /><br />To prove to me that space behaves as a liquid, please explain, or show how the Bernoulli effect works with space as the fluid medium.<br /><br />To get a better feel for this, please try the following fluid dynamics experiment with air. (It also works in water, but is super amazing with air)<br /><br />Obtain:<br />1) A piece of paper, about 2 inches by 8 inches.<br />2) Either:<br />a) A small wooden sewing spool with a hole in it, or<br />b) A rubber stopper with a single hole through it<br /><br />Procedure:<br />a) Hold the end of the piece of paper in one hand, and the spool in the other.<br />b) Allow the paper to very gently drape over one end of the spool, so that it is flat against the spool, covering the hole.<br />c) Blow through the hole in the spool.<br /><br />Observe:<br />When you blow as hard as you can through the hole in the spool, the paper doesn't blow away from the other side of the spool.
 
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emperor_of_localgroup

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@evilellis2<br />We may laugh at you now, but I wont be surprised if oneday we find the space possesses some liquid properties. It did occur to me the expansion of the space, that we are struggling to explain thesedays, resembles pouring more liquid into the existing liquid. To some extend, more liquid means more expansion, and more separations of objects in it.<br /><br />Well, our mind has no limit to imagination. But it would be interesting. Do you have any link? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font size="2" color="#ff0000"><strong>Earth is Boring</strong></font> </div>
 
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