Two planes report 'bright green UFO' swooping through the clouds over Canada

rod

Oct 22, 2019
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Well, reports like this I think are common place and reported in various media sources too like this article is. Many consider such objects to be solid evidence we are being visited by space aliens, and likely prepared for a wonderous revelation to come in the near future, perhaps. UAPs/UFOs buzzing around our skies seem to defy the laws of physics as some reports I read suggest. However consider the exoplanet inventory now.

The Extrasolar Planets Encyclopaedia (exoplanet.eu), 4813 confirmed with 1314 of them, confirmed with sizes <=2 earth radii, so perhaps some are rocky planets too :)

NASA Exoplanet Archive (caltech.edu), 4466 confirmed exoplanets listed with 1309 confirmed with sizes <=2 earth radii.

At some point in the investigative reporting of UFOs, where these lights are coming from, if from other stars with exoplanets, should be confirmed - solidly. We have an abundant exoplanet record now to compare with the UAP/UFOs. So far, showing where they are coming from remains unconfirmed.

Helio on the forums recently asked where are all the observations of UAPs/UFOs from the amateur astronomy observers? I am one of those and regularly use two telescopes, a 90-mm refractor and a 10-inch Newtonian. Nothing to report about lights buzzing around in my views, including 10x50 binoculars and sweeps of the night sky or even solar observing using my 90-mm with solar filter tracking various sunspots reported at spaceweather.com.
 
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Dec 9, 2020
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Ref: "Green Light Flashes", Wikipedia. This effect at sunset and sunrise is "what the Sun and our atmosphere occasionally do" especially at sunset when flying westward.
 
Apr 15, 2020
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@rod I feel like the middle part of your post is incongruent with the first and last paragraph (though, perhaps I'm just misunderstanding).

I think the fact that these claims are not coming from people who take nightly pleasure (or for that matter, an entire career) in viewing the skies through astronomical instruments is telling. For, these are the people that have taken time to learn the many eccentricities of of the night sky and thus, do not get fooled into reporting "UFO!" every time something "odd" occurs.

It seems more often than not, a report of a UFO can be explained by something much more commonplace; i.e. an Iridium Flare, a used rocket stage (often spinning, thus the changing amounts of reflective surface from the perspective of the viewer giving the odd effect of "blinking" or "strobing"), a meteor, a de-orbiting satellite (or any space junk), or many other "mundane" events of varying levels of likelihood and/or "oddness".

If there were UFO's (of the ET variety) buzzing all over our skies, wouldn't it likely be these people who sounded the alarm? People who statistically spend more time looking at the sky than any others?

I would love if it were true, if the stellar neighborhood was teeming with life. However, unfortunately, there is no evidence to support this that cannot be also explained by the ordinary.
 
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rod

Oct 22, 2019
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AlbusRockets post #4, "If there were UFO's (of the ET variety) buzzing all over our skies, wouldn't it likely be these people who sounded the alarm? People who statistically spend more time looking at the sky than any others?"

It would seem so because these folks are in many different locations and observing large portions of the sky too. There are plenty of groups and individuals out during the nights viewing the heavens with quality equipment, as well as daytime solar observers. I was recently at my telescope dealer shop and an individual with his smart device showed a number of solar images taken with his (expensive) solar telescope system. He even had great images of various galaxies and globular clusters too (he used an Astrophysics refractor model). No triangle shaped flashing lights were reported :)
 
Feb 3, 2020
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Helio on the forums recently asked where are all the observations of UAPs/UFOs from the amateur astronomy observers? I am one of those and regularly use two telescopes, a 90-mm refractor and a 10-inch Newtonian. Nothing to report about lights buzzing around in my views, including 10x50 binoculars and sweeps of the night sky or even solar observing using my 90-mm with solar filter tracking various sunspots reported at spaceweather.com.

Now, please don't label me a UFO pusher; but, I wonder how many astronomers (amateur or otherwise) or viewing the skies from an off-shore vantage point? Those oceans are mighty big.
 
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rod

Oct 22, 2019
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Now, please don't label me a UFO pusher; but, I wonder how many astronomers (amateur or otherwise) or viewing the skies from an off-shore vantage point? Those oceans are mighty big.
The assumption here it seems KC Strom is that the UAPs/UFOs sightings appear only over the oceans, my observation. In addition, I like strong investigative reporting standards. Who, What, Where, When, How, and Why questions asked, over, and over again.
 
Jun 1, 2020
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I would favor a larger-than-average Perseid shower particle. They certainly can be very bright, especially when viewed from higher elevations. And they can be bright green due to several things, especially Ni burning (common to meteoroids).

Gander at this green meteor.
 
Apr 15, 2020
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Now, please don't label me a UFO pusher; but, I wonder how many astronomers (amateur or otherwise) or viewing the skies from an off-shore vantage point? Those oceans are mighty big.
True, I suppose, most amateur and professional astronomers do their observing from continent-based telescopes (Spanish Canary Islands and Hawaii-based operations being the outliers that come to mind).

However, it also must be noted that the vast number of "UFO sightings" come from continent-based sources as well. So, the fact that most astronomers are land based is immaterial.
 
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rod

Oct 22, 2019
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FYI, I pass this report I read recently along here. O UFOs, Where Art Thou?, https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/o-ufos-where-art-thou/

"Five reasons why sorting all of this out is so scientifically challenging"

An interesting short read for these 5 points. I note #1: "Challenge No. 1: All UAP/UFO incidents are nonrepeatable: we can’t go back and perform the “experiment” of that exact observation again." "For science in general, this kind of thing is a big headache. A lack of repeatability or replication poses a very significant challenge for the interpretation of data (especially if those data are noisy and incomplete); for filling in obvious gaps; and for eliminating or supporting any hypotheses. As the Pentagon report states: “Limited data leaves most UAP unexplained….” Limited, anecdotal and nonrepeatable are hardly the words you want to use, but they apply here."
 
Feb 3, 2020
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True, I suppose, most amateur and professional astronomers do their observing from continent-based telescopes (Spanish Canary Islands and Hawaii-based operations being the outliers that come to mind).

However, it also must be noted that the vast number of "UFO sightings" come from continent-based sources as well. So, the fact that most astronomers are land based is immaterial.

I agree with your post. It is immaterial that most astronomers are land-based. I was simply countering a statement made in an earlier post. For the record I do no not believe aliens are flitting about our skies on a regular basis. I do, however, believe it is possible we may have been "cruised" at some time.

I made my statement to make a point. Something about modern science bothers me. When my thinking matures to the level I can make a rational argument; trust me, I will.

I began to lose faith when the cosmological constant suddenly became the cosmological variable.
 
Jun 1, 2020
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True, I suppose, most amateur and professional astronomers do their observing from continent-based telescopes (Spanish Canary Islands and Hawaii-based operations being the outliers that come to mind).

However, it also must be noted that the vast number of "UFO sightings" come from continent-based sources as well. So, the fact that most astronomers are land based is immaterial.
Yes. And what purpose would actual flying objects have far into the Pacific? Training? ;)
 
Apr 15, 2020
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I agree with your post. It is immaterial that most astronomers are land-based. I was simply countering a statement made in an earlier post. For the record I do no not believe aliens are flitting about our skies on a regular basis. I do, however, believe it is possible we may have been "cruised" at some time.

I made my statement to make a point. Something about modern science bothers me. When my thinking matures to the level I can make a rational argument; trust me, I will.

I began to lose faith when the cosmological constant suddenly became the cosmological variable.
I didn't mean to belittle your argument, so if that is what I did, I sincerely apologize.

I don't think it is likely that we have been "visited" by ET (though absence of proof does not mean proof of absence).

Furthermore, even IF there were space-faring ET's out there, why would they have to dip into our atmosphere at all? Surely, any ET advanced enough to regularly travel interstellar distances would be able to use remote sensing data (of which, even we, a vastly technologically inferior species, currently have) to probe every aspect of our planet from afar?

____

I believe that the beauty of (pure) science is that it is, in its very nature, self-correcting. Nothing is sacred, nothing is permanent. Every theory or hypothesis or law is always on the chopping block. And that... That is why I love science.

Relatedly, I highly recommend Carl Sagan's The Demon Haunted World [ https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/159731/the-demon-haunted-world-by-carl-sagan/ ] . I think it a beautifully written insight into the awesomeness of critical thinking and science.
 
Feb 3, 2020
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Thank you, AlbusRockets.

I did not consider for a moment that you belittled my argument. No offence taken and no apology required. If earthlings were interstellar travelers and we became aware of a noisy little planet "out in the sticks" I'm guessing we would seriously consider stopping by to check them out. Perhaps someday...

With respect to science, I, too, love it. The more I think about my issues with modern science, your post gets to the heart of the matter.

"...I believe that the beauty of (pure) science is that it is, in its very nature, self-correcting. Nothing is sacred, nothing is permanent. Every theory or hypothesis or law is always on the chopping block. And that... That is why I love science..."

I'm beginning to wonder if every theory, hypothesis or law is, in fact on the chopping block. Certain concepts seem to be sacrosanct. I'll just leave it there.

Thanks.
 
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