Video of dog sensing impending earthquake

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starsinmyeyes44

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The dog is aware of the quake several seconds before the shaking starts...but the man also runs from his desk right before the camera shows movement. I suppose he heard something.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FV4EMzyJsqU[/youtube]
 
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blass

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It makes sense really. The "rolling wave" of the earthquake in the ground is probably slower than the sound...so the sound of the rumbling reaches the ears of the people and the dig just before the "rolling wave" reaches them.

This may explain the so-called third sense that animals seem to have. It's just that they have better hearing than humans and can hear the approaching disaster.
 
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scottb50

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blass":2fjrtj47 said:
It makes sense really. The "rolling wave" of the earthquake in the ground is probably slower than the sound...so the sound of the rumbling reaches the ears of the people and the dig just before the "rolling wave" reaches them.

This may explain the so-called third sense that animals seem to have. It's just that they have better hearing than humans and can hear the approaching disaster.
I would think it fair to say most all their senses are better then humans, as are most animals. Probably it is a learned response on our part rather then innate, we have more understanding of the situation.
 
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starsinmyeyes44

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blass":36rfydj0 said:
It's just that they have better hearing than humans and can hear the approaching disaster.
Yes...their ability to hear seismic noises and also detect movement is much keener than ours. I have read that animals in the area affected by the 2004 tsunami were running to higher ground 2 hours before the wave hit....they sensed the earthquake that precipitated the tsunami.

Here is an interesting video about elephants using their extraordinarily sensitive trunks to detect sounds outside our range of hearing...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pLBe8sOP ... re=channel


[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pLBe8sOPO7Y&feature=channel[/youtube]
 
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a_lost_packet_

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starsinmyeyes44":1xu9smg4 said:
The dog is aware of the quake several seconds before the shaking starts...but the man also runs from his desk right before the camera shows movement. I suppose he heard something.
Thanks! That is awesome!

I've always wanted to see a good, clear animal reaction before an earthquake. I've seen a few, mostly equines. But, I've never seen a dog reaction before. Pretty dang cool.
 
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andrew_t1000

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I do a lot of work with ultrasonic transducers, to see if they are working I "key" transmitters at my dogs, with only a couple of millivolts going into an ultrasonic transmitter they can certainly here it.
If you really want an "eye opener", dogs can see the light from infra-red leds!
I've tested this a couple of times now, going into a mine near here using my sony camcorder for a night scope, with the view finder hard against my eye, I can see my dogs looking around where the IR light is falling.
I am totally convinced that dogs can hear in 3D, everytime we go to said mine, they always run in the entrance right to the end then run back, all in total darkness!
My youngest dog has never touched the sides or tripped even at a flat run, but the older dogs, who's hearing is getting a little sketchy are way more cautious.
I've tried a few other tests like tossing a ball to them in total darkness, in quiet environment they catch the ball around half the time, with a bit of background noise they can catch it every time, same goes for IR illumination.

I know a scary blind woman, who is a black belt in karate, that can juggle shot glass's (even after she has emptied them!), we have hustled for drinks doing this, she says the louder the background sound is the easier it is to do!
She has told me the she is aware of ultrasonics as well, not that she can hear them, just is aware of high frequency.
A few years ago when a small tremor hit here in Adelaide she woke up in the middle of the night yelling "What the #### is that?", a few minutes later we heard and felt the shaking, it was only about 3 on the Richter scale.
One lady you do NOT want to play murder in the dark with!

I think there is a lot about sensory perception we don't know about.
 
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a_lost_packet_

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andrew_t1000":fzcgjsu5 said:
..If you really want an "eye opener", dogs can see the light from infra-red leds!
I've tested this a couple of times now, going into a mine near here using my sony camcorder for a night scope, with the view finder hard against my eye, I can see my dogs looking around where the IR light is falling.
I don't know how that could be or what mechanism would be involved. Dog vision is poor, compared to ours with the exception of night vision which is a bit better due to some lining in their eyes we simply don't have. But, infrared is a whole different ball of wax, especially in a warm-blooded creature. A dog's eyes would either have to be significantly cooler than the rest of its body or somehow insulated from it's own IR signature in order to avoid blinding itself to infra-red radiation. That's not impossible but, it certainly presents a problem. Unless, somehow, the dog's vision has developed to such an extent that it automatically adjusts for the internal temperature of its eyes, somehow processing that out.. Again, doubtful.

What "might" be happening is the dogs, which can see better than humans in low-light conditions, are watching your movements in an uncertain environment. It is also possible that your IR emitter is not "clean" and is emitting something the dogs can see but, isn't quite infra-red. It may be too faint for you to detect but, with the dog's extended capabilities in low-light detection, they could be picking up the "movement" of the emitter's near-infra spectrum or otherwise anomalous emission.

I'd have to see a genuine, well-conducted study of canine infra-red eyesight in order to believe it for myself. It wouldn't be terribly difficult to construct a proper experiment without dissecting a dog. :) You'd just have to train them a bit and then adjust for IR accordingly and note their behavior.

I am totally convinced that dogs can hear in 3D, everytime we go to said mine, they always run in the entrance right to the end then run back, all in total darkness!
Well, dog's don't like the "total darkness" anymore than we do. But, the can see reasonably well in low light conditions. It's likely they're able to see a bit better than you. But, dogs do have extraordinary hearing and are very sensitive to all sorts of related things. I wouldn't doubt they can figure out a "sound environment" fairly well but, I don't think they'd run around in it if there was no light at all.

But, they're your dogs so, it's not for me to pass judgment on them. Dogs shouldn't ever be judged.. just enjoyed. ;)

I think there is a lot about sensory perception we don't know about.
I think there are some that are especially interesting that we're just now finding out about. Thinks like a magnetic-sensory system, found in migrating animals, especially birds, is pretty darn neat. Some animals, like certain fish, also seem to have an ability to sense in the infra-red or near infra-red, IIRC. Echolocation, while known for a short while, is still very interesting and I think that the ability to use it as a weapon when hunting or even in examining an object is especially interesting. Elephants "communicating" by listening for low frequency rumbles from other elephants miles away, using just their feet, is very cool. The same goes with hippos and other animals that use communication channels we simply aren't privy to.

I looked around, a bit, to try to find out about IR studies with dogs but, quite frankly, only had a short time to devote to it. If anyone comes across anything, I'd love to read it.
 
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mental_avenger

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Did anyone look at the other videos in that montage? The North Coast CO-OP video was interesting. When the shaking started, some people ran for their lives, some people walked for their lives, and at least one lady just walked out with some obviously unpaid merchandise. :)
 
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Shpaget

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If you look more closely at the video in the first post you'll see that the drawer in the cabinet in the lower left corner opens by itself before the mans runs out. That would mean that there was a smaller quake before the strong one and it's what the man sensed and panicked, but it was too weak to shake the camera or anything else that was standing more firmly.

It is possible that there was one even smaller shake (before that small one) that only the dog sensed. It was laying down after all with a lot of surface contact to transfer the shaking to its body.
 
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mental_avenger

Guest
andrew_t1000":2t7tqmek said:
If you really want an "eye opener", dogs can see the light from infra-red leds!
Infra-red LEDs that are used on security system cameras are available in different wavelengths. LEDs are produced in wavelengths from 370 nm to 1550 nm. The range of Near Infra Red is from about 700nm to 1350nm. Typical IR Illuminators use 850nm LEDs and are the most common. The area illuminated by these are not visible to the human eye, but the LEDs themselves can be seen to glow a dull red. 940nm LED light cannot be seen by the human eye, and the LED does not appear to glow. Of course, human eyes differ slightly in the ranges they can see, just as some people can hear frequencies others cannot.
 
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mental_avenger

Guest
Shpaget":3dvrvrqe said:
If you look more closely at the video in the first post you'll see that the drawer in the cabinet in the lower left corner opens by itself before the mans runs out. That would mean that there was a smaller quake before the strong one and it's what the man sensed and panicked, but it was too weak to shake the camera or anything else that was standing more firmly.
Good eye, I didn’t notice that drawer opening. But the man’s chair spins around quickly as the dog bolts, so I think he was probably responding to the dog jumping up and running, not the drawer.
 
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cookie_thief

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What really fascinates me isn't the dog's apparent sensitivity to the impending quake, but his reaction. She didn't just get up and stare the floor quizically, she ran like a bat outta he**. While the people appear to be heading for a safe room off camera, the dog is scramming out of the building like her tail's on fire. I've never seen a dog react like that before. It's like she's responding to a very deep instinct. What if that quake was several magnitudes larger, who would survive, the dog or the people?
 
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phaze

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People have strange reactions to dangerous things.

Something is happening and you'll see some that are full out running for their lives... then you'll see everything from walkers to embarassed half-walkers... to whatever else... when really they should all be putting out maximum effort.
 
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SPACEINVADOR

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I remember right before a large quake hit, all of my fish started to go crazy. I've been in several large quakes. 1st. thing I do is run for the closest door way and hang-on.

During one big quake around 1987 in Southern Cal. (can't remember which quake it was though), I ran to the front door of my girlfriends house (in Glendora, Ca.) when things started to shake. Looking out towards the street, I could see my truck going up and down with the street, like waves on the ocean. It was really neat to see.

Then in 1992 there was the Landers earthquake, and that was a really neat one as well. The building I was working in (Covina, Ca.) was built on rollers. Talk about moving. During that one, I ran out the back door and into the parking lot. It was up on a hill and I could see big flashes and power outages happening right before my eyes. There was also a strange noise coming from the drains in the curbs of the streets. It sounded like someone blowing into a really big Coke bottle.
 
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R1

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SPACEINVADOR":14vg29su said:
I remember right before a large quake hit, all of my fish started to go crazy. I've been in several large quakes. 1st. thing I do is run for the closest door way and hang-on.

... Looking out towards the street, I could see my truck going up and down with the street, like waves on the ocean. It was really neat to see.

In the Indonesian quake with tsunami, animals fled the coastal area,moving to safer ground.
If your fish started to go crazy, has any research has been done to learn all about orca and other marine life ?
 
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jim48

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Now if only we could get these animals to predict market trends...
 
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a_lost_packet_

Guest
R1":1q2w0dbi said:
...In the Indonesian quake with tsunami, animals fled the coastal area,moving to safer ground.
If your fish started to go crazy, has any research has been done to learn all about orca and other marine life ?
I don't know about marine mammals but, IIRC, some fish move to deeper water and, AFAIK, most coastal fish move farther out. It's similar to storm behavior, IIRC. Sorry I'm so vague. The point is that I do know some marine animals respond by seeking shelter in more stable waters.
 
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