Was Jupiter’s grand tack due to dark matter

Sep 11, 2020
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Could planetary migration be due to dark matter concentrations

Could Jupiter’s grand tack been a result of an decrease of mass in the solar system due to an decrease in dark matter concentrations? If a dwarf galaxy merged with the Milky Way and its dark matter got ahead of its regular matter it might draw down the dark matter around it from the space around our solar system to keep its gravity well full. A wandering black hole that had lost most of its dark matter due to a previous encounter could also cause this effect. This would also have moved Venus and all of the planets closer to the sun at that time. As the dark matter distribution equalized everything would have returned to its previous orbits.
 
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Sep 11, 2020
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From Wikipedia
“The formation of giant planets is a more complicated process. It is thought to occur beyond the frost line, where planetary embryos mainly are made of various types of ice. As a result, they are several times more massive than in the inner part of the protoplanetary disk. What follows after the embryo formation is not completely clear.”

When a star goes nova its dark matter also flows out of the dissipating gravity well. Thus the concentration of dark matter is higher in the resultant nebulae. Over time this concentration would drop causing an inward migration of all the planets until equilibrium is reached. From this we can infer that dark matter is very viscous.
 
Oct 23, 2020
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Could planetary migration be due to dark matter concentrations

Could Jupiter’s grand tack been a result of an decrease of mass in the solar system due to an decrease in dark matter concentrations? If a dwarf galaxy merged with the Milky Way and its dark matter got ahead of its regular matter it might draw down the dark matter around it from the space around our solar system to keep its gravity well full. A wandering black hole that had lost most of its dark matter due to a previous encounter could also cause this effect. This would also have moved Venus and all of the planets closer to the sun at that time. As the dark matter distribution equalized everything would have returned to its previous orbits.
Planetary migration occurs when a planet or other body in orbit around a star interacts with a disk of gas or planetesimals, resulting in the alteration of its orbital parameters, especially its semi-major axis. Planetary migration is the most likely explanation for hot Jupiters: exoplanets with Jovian masses but orbits of only a few days.
 

Catastrophe

The devil is in the detail
The history of the Solar System is quite complicated already.
Is not dark matter (not totally accepted, it seems) going to throw the whole caboodle into frenzy?
Are the planets, are we, all partially dark matter?
Perhaps we all have a dark side?

Cat :)
 
Sep 10, 2021
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There are 2 schools of thought on hot jupiters. The first is that they form close to their parent stars, and the second is that they form beyond the frost line and migrate inwards. The migration theory is more commonly accepted.
 
Aug 29, 2020
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Could planetary migration be due to dark matter concentrations

Could Jupiter’s grand tack been a result of an decrease of mass in the solar system due to an decrease in dark matter concentrations? If a dwarf galaxy merged with the Milky Way and its dark matter got ahead of its regular matter it might draw down the dark matter around it from the space around our solar system to keep its gravity well full. A wandering black hole that had lost most of its dark matter due to a previous encounter could also cause this effect. This would also have moved Venus and all of the planets closer to the sun at that time. As the dark matter distribution equalized everything would have returned to its previous orbits.
Dark matter in my mind is like pixie dust. Its something scientists use to sprinkle on things they cannot explain in hopes some magical movement will be realized.

As far as Jupiter's grand tack hypothesis goes, if it did move back and forth toward the Sun, it could have been caused by something else.

Example: If the orbit speed of the moon slowed, it would fall closer to earth. If Jupiter's orbit speed slowed, it would fall closer to the Sun. Contrary, if Jupiter's orbit speed increased, it would move further away from the Sun.

One would have to ask what could cause a planets orbital speed to increase or slow? Maybe periods of 100,000 years of solar activity rising and falling? The Sun does have solar wind and magnetic interactions which may catch a magnetosphere like a sail.

Also, it appears the asteroids are highly affected by the gravity of Jupiter by this image:

Would these asteroids follow in a grand-tack movement? Things would get dicey. Hmmm..
 
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Aug 14, 2020
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I'm somewhat surprised at you, ZAP. We observe a tack occurring regarding every planet when it passes by Earth in its orbit. Only Jupiter coming and going, and the regular tack occurring in the center of that coming and going, herein regarding our Earth, has far more consequential effect as far as we are concerned than other planets' comings and goings. The regularity of the tack is an optical illusion, the physical effects upon other planets, most especially upon ours for us, of Jupiter's comings and goings, approaches and leavings, aren't.
 
Aug 29, 2020
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I'm somewhat surprised at you, ZAP. We observe a tack occurring regarding every planet when it passes by Earth in its orbit. Only Jupiter coming and going, and the regular tack occurring in the center of that coming and going, herein regarding our Earth, has far more consequential effect as far as we are concerned than other planets' comings and goings. The regularity of the tack is an optical illusion, the physical effects upon other planets, most especially upon ours for us, of Jupiter's comings and goings, approaches and leavings, aren't.
Yeah the planets do drift in elliptical orbits all the time, but I thought we were talking about a "grand" tack.
 
Aug 14, 2020
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Possibly I'm not getting this definition of "tack" correct. I'm thinking of the illusionary appearance of a momentary hesitation and apparent reversal of course of the planet before it continues on in its orbit -- a natural length contraction in progress to length expansion optical illusion phenomenon in passing. The consequences of Jupiter's rounding past Earth are large enough, though regular when--, for me to consider it "grand", including its "tack", all the time. Something I learned about a long time ago.

"tack": from Merriam Webster:

4 : to change the direction of (a sailing ship) when sailing close-hauled by turning the bow to the wind and shifting the sails so as to fall off on the other side at about the same angle as before
1 a : to tack a sailing ship b of a ship : to change to an opposite tack by turning the bow to the wind c : to follow a course against the wind by a series of tacks
2 a : to follow a zigzag course b : .....
 
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From encyclopedia:
In planetary astronomy, the grand tack hypothesis proposes that Jupiter formed at 3.5 AU, then migrated inward to 1.5 AU, before reversing course due to capturing Saturn in an orbital resonance, eventually halting near its current orbit at 5.2 AU. The reversal of Jupiter's planetary migration is likened to the path of a sailboat changing directions (tacking) as it travels against the wind.
 
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