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We hail from black hole andquasar.

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alokmohan

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Astronomers have taken a baby step in trying to answer the cosmic question of where we come from. <br /><br />http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20071010/ap_on_sc/cosmic_dust<br /> <br />Planets and much on them, including humans, come from dust — mostly from dying stars. But where did the dust that helped form those early stars come from?<br /><br />A NASA telescope may have spotted one of the answers. It's in the wind bursting out of super-massive black holes.<br /><br />The Spitzer Space Telescope identified large quantities of freshly made space dust in a quasar about 8 billion light years from here.<br /><br />Astronomers used the telescope to break down the wavelengths of light in the quasar to figure out what was in the space dust. They found signs of glass, sand, crystal, marble, rubies and sapphires, said Ciska Markwick-Kemper of the University of Manchester in England. She is the lead author of a study that will be published later this month in Astrophysical Journal Letters.<br /><br />Dust is important in the cooling process to make stars, which are predominantly gas. The leftover dust tends to clump together to make planets, comets and asteroids, said astronomer Sarah Gallagher, a study co-author at the University of California Los Angeles.<br /><br />"In the end, everything comes from space dust," Markwick-Kemper said. "It's putting all the pieces of the puzzle together to figure out where we came from."<br /><br />Astronomers figure that the planets that formed in the past several billion years — and those away from quasars — came from dust that was belched from dying stars. That's what happened with Earth.<br /><br />That still leaves a question about where the dust from the first couple billion years of the universe came from, which helped form early generations of star systems.<br /><br />"It's formed in the wind," of the black holes, Markwick-Kemper said. Gas molecules collide in the se
 
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dragon04

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<font color="yellow">Planets and much on them, including humans, come from dust — mostly from dying stars. But where did the dust that helped form those early stars come from?</font><br /><br />I'd easily agree that black holes as quasars' emissions of energetic particles might provide a force that pushes dust around, but the events just prior to the implosion of massive stars is what creates the dust, and not the BH's themselves.<br /><br />BH's may have an effect, but I can't think they are the cause.<br /><br />The article is a little misleading in the way it's stated, I think.<br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <em>"2012.. Year of the Dragon!! Get on the Dragon Wagon!".</em> </div>
 
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alokmohan

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Frankly I agree with you.But I cherish to come from black hole.
 
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dragon04

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Look at it this way. A massive star gives its life to create you just before it dies and becomes a black hole. Before it becomes something that can no longer be part of the Universe.<br /><br />The mother dies giving birth and forever vanishes. Yet you are here.<br /><br />You can never see the mother again, but you know that you exist because of her death. That's the tragic beauty of life in the Universe.<br /><br /><br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <em>"2012.. Year of the Dragon!! Get on the Dragon Wagon!".</em> </div>
 
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