Weird 'gravitational molecules' could orbit black holes like electrons swirling around atoms

Dec 19, 2019
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Every closer to my theoretical concept for an alternative perspective of the universe. A little known team of researchers has shown that a special kind of "particle" can exist around a pair of black holes [in a similar way as an electron can exist around a pair of hydrogen atoms], and they introduce it as the first example of a "gravitational molecule." What's more, these proposed "gravitational molecules" can form themselves into certain patterns that resemble how electron fields arrange themselves in molecules. The authors of this study want to demonstrate that evidence to support "scalar fields" may indeed exist around binary black holes in a behavior similar of scalar fields in that scenario mimics how electrons behave in diatomic molecules. Furthermore, it is this team of researchers belief that these gravitational molecules respond within the presence of the black hole, allowing its corresponding particle to appear only in certain regions or orbits - as understood of "scalar fields." And just as in diatomic molecules, they intend to describe "scalar fields" around two black holes, like in a binary black hole system.

Subsequently this strange process may give us hints to the identity of dark matter and the ultimate nature of space-time. If dark matter is indeed composed of some sort of scalar field, then this result means that dark matter would exist in a very strange state around binary black holes — the mysterious dark particles would have to exist in very specific orbits, just like electrons do in atoms. But binary black holes don't last forever; they emit gravitational radiation and eventually collide and coalesce into a single black hole. These dark matter scalar fields would affect any gravitational waves emitted during such collisions, because they would filter, deflect and reshape any waves passing through regions of increased dark matter density. This means we might be able to detect this kind of dark matter with enough sensitivity in existing gravitational wave detectors. In short: We soon might be able to confirm the existence of gravitational molecules, and through that open a window into the hidden dark sector of our cosmos.

Why do I see this as promising? It has been the subject of my research that dark matter is this gravitational potential, and that the creation of matter as a whole is ultimately the inducement of a complementary displacement, or warping, in the dark energy medium of the space-time fabric. And within this warping, there is yet another perturbation in the whole matter created; a dual relationship of newly created positive density matter in an envelopment of negative density matter. The complementary displacement insulates the newly created positive density matter in an envelopment of negative density matter. This envelope of negative density matter, known as dark matter, then infiltrates the spaces in matter, providing it with the ability to interact, bond, and evolve.

For me it is not all surprising that both the concepts of dark matter and gravity defy all attempts to be identified as a particle, because I see them as one and the same. The only way that a black hole could work is by thinking about gravity a bit differently. In fact, one actually has to re-imagine the universe from its perspective make up. Considering the current notion the standard model of cosmology, the current measurements decompose the total energy of the observable universe with approximately 68% dark energy, 27% mass–energy via dark matter, and 5% mass-energy via ordinary matter. In which case, as black holes are significantly more energy dense than ordinary matter, it would then make more sense that black holes are a product of dark matter rather than condensed ordinary matter. This requires that we rethink these internal relationships for total energy.

If I apply the concepts this proposed theory for "gravitational molecules" I can surmise that a graviton is meant to be the smaller constituent part of such gravitational molecules. The basic problem with such research is trying to identify dark matter as a particle. It is the same problem that physicists have had with trying to identify gravity as a particle, but not without trying. In theories of quantum gravity, the graviton is the hypothetical quantum of gravity, an elementary particle that mediates the force of gravity. There is no complete quantum field theory of gravitons due to an outstanding mathematical problem with re-normalization in general relativity.

Like the hypothetical graviton, dark matter density mirrors that of ordinary matter density; in effect, negative mass density and positive mass density. And even though ordinary matter (positive mass density) reveals its coherency in particle form upon detection, dark matter (negative mass density) does not. In which case it would then follow that dark matter can be accumulated, separate of ordinary matter. It would therefore also follow that the gravitational force is more representative of negative density mass than positive density mass. Therefore it would not be a great leap of imagination to view the notion of black holes as made up only of dark matter.

Example: Upon this hypothesis then, one can expect that there is a require transition to separate ordinary matter from its complementary dark matter upon the event horizon of a black hole. It starts first with the disintegration of matter, as a whole, as it interacts with the event horizon of the black hole. As the positive density mass is 'squeezed' upon its own gravitational acceleration toward the black hole, liken to the spaghettification effect, its matter changes to allow for its disintegration via transmutation and the massive release of photons due to alpha decay and beta decay. This is the effect wherein positive density mass is collected within the event horizon, into a plasma, increasing its photon density. This 'squeezing' effect is like extracting out the dark matter from the whole matter, allowing for the ordinary matter to be reduced to its smallest constituent components. The dark matter is then absorbed into the black hole, and the remnants of ordinary matter are discarded and radiated out at high velocity back into the cosmos; to start, once again, to reintegrate into the universe via bonding and evolving.

If you're interested in exploring this concept more, please review the alternative theories presented in the book, 'The Evolutioning of Creation: Volume 2', or even the ramifications of these concepts in the sci-fi fantasy adventure, 'Shadow-Forge Revelations'.
 

rod

Oct 22, 2019
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Post #3 presents some interesting info on DM. Other reports like this, 'Searching for axion dark matter conversion signals in the magnetic fields around neutron stars', https://phys.org/news/2020-11-axion-dark-conversion-magnetic-fields.html, and the paper at 'Green Bank and Effelsberg Radio Telescope Searches for Axion Dark Matter Conversion in Neutron Star Magnetospheres', https://journals.aps.org/prl/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevLett.125.171301, “ABSTRACT Axion dark matter (DM) may convert to radio-frequency electromagnetic radiation in the strong magnetic fields around neutron stars. The radio signature of such a process would be an ultranarrow spectral peak at a frequency determined by the mass of the axion particle..."

My observation. The NASA ADS Abstract is 'Green Bank and Effelsberg Radio Telescope Searches for Axion Dark Matter Conversion in Neutron Star Magnetospheres', https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2020PhRvL.125q1301F/abstract, October 2020. arXiv paper attached. The arXiv paper shows the reported distance for the two neutron stars studied, "We take RX J0806.4−4123 and RX J0720.4−3125 to be at distances of 250 pc and 360 pc from Earth, respectively [35]."

So far, searches for various DM particles or DM candidates continue to come up short in the detection efforts. As the paper abstract begins, "Axion dark matter (DM) may convert to radio-frequency electromagnetic radiation in the strong magnetic fields around neutron stars. The radio signature of such a process would be an ultranarrow spectral peak at a frequency determined by the mass of the axion particle."

This study using the two neutron stars cited did not find the axions. The paper has 18 references to 'dark matter', 139 references to 'axion', 13 references to 'axions', and 1 reference to 'wimp' DM searches.]
 

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