What do constellations look like from other stars?

Jun 7, 2021
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Is there any software that shows what constellations look like from other nearby stars? I am curious to see what the rest of Cassiopeia looks like from Archid (Eta Cassiopeiae).
 
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COLGeek

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Apr 3, 2020
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Considering that the universe is 3-dimensional, perspective will change and star positions will be relatively different from various viewpoints. So, what looks like the "Big Dipper" to us, would look very different to an observer looking at the same arrangement of stars from a 90 degree alternative location (relative to our observational lines).

I would think this could be easily replicated with arranged objects in the middle of a field and then looking at them from different locations. You could even use a drone to see the objects from above (getting below them might be a little more difficult).
 
Jun 7, 2021
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They'll look the same. The only thing that can change is the sky orientation, but anything else will remain the same.
I think you misunderstand my question. Archid (η Cassiopeiae A) is a very sunlike star and part of a binary system, less than 20 light years from the sun. Most of the other stars in Cassiopeia are further away.
My question is how would the other stars in Cassiopeia look from a hypothetical inhabited planet circling Archid? Would Cassiopeia be recognizable? How far would the positions of these stars be shifted, relative to the other stars?
Lastly, is there some software that could draw Cassiopeia as seen from Archid, or any other constellation as seen from any star other than the sun, and compare it to how the constellation appears from earth?
 
Jun 15, 2021
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Of course, the view of the constellations from the side of other stars changes. This is the same if you dig a long ditch, put red balls in 30 centimeters increments and look from above, then it will be so, ball - emptiness - ball. And if you look as if you put the camera on the ground, it will be a solid line of red balls. So it is with the constellations, from some side it is a constellation, and on the other hand it is just a bunch of stars, and on the other hand, it seems like one star.
 
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Catastrophe

The devil is in the detail
I think you misunderstand my question. Archid (η Cassiopeiae A) is a very sunlike star and part of a binary system, less than 20 light years from the sun. Most of the other stars in Cassiopeia are further away.
My question is how would the other stars in Cassiopeia look from a hypothetical inhabited planet circling Archid? Would Cassiopeia be recognizable? How far would the positions of these stars be shifted, relative to the other stars?
Lastly, is there some software that could draw Cassiopeia as seen from Archid, or any other constellation as seen from any star other than the sun, and compare it to how the constellation appears from earth?
If you take line of sight from here and go to Archid, and since:
"Most of the other stars in Cassiopeia are further away."
then those stars will appear almost exactly as they do from here. The other Cass. stars will appear different in relation to their distance away.
This is only because you have kept to the same line of sight.
See my post #10.

Cat :)
 
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The way I see it is that we have to take into account the posts #5 and #10 to have a complete answer. They may seem to be different, to be the opposite, but to tell the thruth I don't think so. If you try to take into account the two of them you will have a complete answer in my opinion. The first is something we always have to face in our reality since everything is given by prospective, the second is mostly astronomical, we cannot talk about the Universe without thinking the physics of it is different from our world after all.
 
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Aug 6, 2021
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Nem igazán fognak változni! Évszázadok, évezredek teltek el és még mindig ott vannak. Színekben és méretekben még lehetséges eltérések

They won't really change! Centuries, millennia have passed and they are still there. Differences in colors and sizes are still possible
 
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Catastrophe

The devil is in the detail
They won't really change! Centuries, millennia have passed and they are still there. Colors and sizes may vary


[Google translate]

Seems poster may misunderstand the OP question.

Cat ;)
 
Aug 21, 2021
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Don't forget, the 'constellations' are not really points on a plane except in the imagination of the viewer. All the stars in a given 'constellation' might be possibly thousands of light years closer to or farther from us. Seen from 90 degrees away at the same distance, there would be no resemblance, but from any stars in our 'neighborhood', there would be only minor differences in the shape of the 'plane' of a constellation.
 
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