Question What is the farthest distance an animal has traveled in space?

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May 25, 2021
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Due to the secrecy of other space faring countries, I don't know any of their achievements, but no primate in the American Space Program ever left low Earth orbit.

-Wolf sends

Edit: Other than man.
True and my mistake she was a he. His name was Ham. I think Russia sent one up also, it died.
 
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Jun 13, 2021
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I simply cannot understand how humans would suffice with some Earth / Moon based testing to assume that they can safely explore the Solar system, and are already investing trillions of USD for a mission to Mars in 2035.




It seems crazy that no insect or bacteria as of today, went farther than the 🌒 Moon.
 

Wolfshadw

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Apr 1, 2020
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1) We don't "assume" we can safely explore the solar system. As with ANY mission that leaves the ground (in air or space), there are risks. We KNOW that there are risks and it takes the smartest and bravest of us to accept those risks and still move forward. We do everything we can to mitigate those risks. Unfortunately, not everything goes as planned and then there are the risks we never thought of.

Apollo 1 - If the plugs out test was deemed dangerous, it wouldn't have been performed. It was and people died.
Space Shuttle Challenger - If we knew the cold temperatures would hamper the functionality of the O-Rings, we wouldn't have launched. We did and people died.
Space Shuttle Columbia - If we had thought we needed to check the structural integrity of our heat shielding we would have. We didn't and people died.

There are some of the very best and brightest people working in the space administrations of many countries around the world, but they can't think of everything. They do their best and, unfortunately, that's not always enough.

2) We've done the Moon. We know we can get there and get back safely. In my personal opinion, I don't think we should have ever stopped going to the Moon. We SHOULD have fully functional and self sufficient lunar bases already, but that wasn't my decision (I was only three when they cancelled the Apollo missions). Also in my opinion, the mindset is that we need to press forward. We shouldn't repeat what we've already done except in preparation for our next achievements. Mars is the next logical step, so that's where we're heading with the same "Can-Do" attitude that we had back in the 60's, going to the Moon.

-Wolf sends
 
Jun 13, 2021
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Since there is no evidence to explain the origin of life, one is to make an assumption.

From that perspective it is plausible (perhaps aught to be natural) to question whether it would be valid to assume that life is something independent from the Solar system.

Is there at least one clue that life is independent from the Solar system?

If not, would it not be logical that life most likely originates from the ☀ when the origin would need to lay within the Solar system?
 
Jun 13, 2021
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Why draw conclusions? I find it much easier to simply accept the fact that "We Don't Know!"

-Wolf sends
At question is whether it would be logical to 'assume' that humans can safely explore the Solar system based on Earth / Moon based testing.

Why wouldn't it be one of the first things to test whether Earth life is possible farther away from Earth and for example, considering the planned Mars mission in 2035, beyond Mars?

As it appears, not even a 🦠 bacteria went farther than the 🌒 Moon (as part of a test).
 
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There are some of the very best and brightest people working in the space administrations of many countries around the world, but they can't think of everything. They do their best and, unfortunately, that's not always enough.
Do you believe that life started at some point in time and has been passed on like a fire?

Since there is no evidence for the origin of life, one is to make an assumption. From that perspective it is logical to question whether it would be valid to assume that life is something independent from the Solar system.

Is there at least one clue that life is independent from the Solar system?

If not, would it not be logical that life most likely originates from the ☀ Sun when the origin would need to lay within the Solar system?
 

Wolfshadw

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Do you believe that life started at some point in time and has been passed on like a fire?
No. No one knows how life started in the universe.

Since there is no evidence for the origin of life, one is to make an assumption. From that perspective it is logical to question whether it would be valid to assume that life is something independent from the Solar system.
One can assume whatever they want, but there is no evidence either way that shows where life originated from.

Is there at least one clue that life is independent from the Solar system?
No. We have no evidence of the existence of life outside the solar system. Therefore, we have no evidence that life originated outside the solar system.

If not, would it not be logical that life most likely originates from the ☀ Sun when the origin would need to lay within the Solar system?
No. There is no evidence that life exists within the Sun. While the base elements of life (Oxygen, Carbon, Hydrogen, etc...) all formed from within a star, the origin of life is an unknown.

-Wolf sends
 
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No. No one knows how life started in the universe.
Do you believe that life merely requires a 'start' (in time) and in that sense is passed on like a fire? What would be the basis for that idea?

No. There is no evidence that life exists within the Sun. While the base elements of life (Oxygen, Carbon, Hydrogen, etc...) all formed from within a star, the origin of life is an unknown.
The suggestion in the OP (the Neutrino-biological cell theory of mind) is that life originates from the Sun as an 'actual' origin, not that life resides within the Sun.

In the suggested theory, life would arise within the scope of 'interaction' by Neutrinos. Essentially, Neutrinos would transfer within that interaction 'the essence of valuing' (consciousness) onto the level of an individual.

A recent scientific study showed that rocks on earth created the first photosynthesis that created oxygen on earth that enabled organic life to arise. It started hundreds of millions of years before the first organic life forms existed. In a sense, even 'rocks' and minerals may be considered alive from such a perspective.

(2021) Non-classical photosynthesis by earth's inorganic semiconducting minerals
Our work in this new research field on the mechanisms of interaction between light, minerals, and life reveals that minerals and organisms are actually inseparable. ... producing hydrogen and oxygen from water
https://phys.org/news/2021-01-non-classical-photosynthesis-earth-inorganic-semiconducting.html

It may be possible to argue that some form of interaction is required for the properties of life to manifest on a physical-individual level. If Neutrinos would be the origin, then that would provide a logical explanation.

When it concerns 'the essence of valuing', it concerns that what precedes 'value' (as a pure concept). Value is what entails empirical reality. What precedes empirical reality lays beyond the individual from the perspective of the individual. From that perspective, the origin of life is also life's purpose.

--

On topic: is there a way to suggest a space-science test?

Since the costs for space launches is reducing significantly, perhaps there are opportunities for lower priority tests that can be envisioned by amateurs/outsiders and for example users on this forum.
 

Wolfshadw

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Apr 1, 2020
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Do you believe that life merely requires a 'start' (in time) and in that sense is passed on like a fire? What would be the basis for that idea?
That is YOUR idea. YOU should come up with a basis for that, based on existing evidence (not supposition).

On topic: is there a way to suggest a space-science test?

Since the costs for space launches is reducing significantly, perhaps there are opportunities for lower priority tests that can be envisioned by amateurs/outsiders and for example users on this forum.
There is no official means of suggesting future missions/experiments. via these forums.

-Wolf sends
 
Jun 13, 2021
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That is YOUR idea. YOU should come up with a basis for that, based on existing evidence (not supposition).
You mentioned the following:

No. No one knows how life started in the universe.
It appears to indicate the presumption that life has a 'start' that is somehow relevant to life in its actuality. I.e., that life is something that an individual can possess because of it, and for example, something that one can take with him/her during space travel.

When life would not derive significance (actuality) by a start in time, then, what options would there be left to explain the origin of life (thus: in an 'actual' or here & now context).

There is no official means of suggesting future missions/experiments. via these forums.
Is there something in general?

Would space organizations / Universities etc be interested in suggestions from the public?

When students from Universities around the world, and perhaps even amateurs/outsiders, can draft proposals for tests and easily submit them for consideration, which are then seriously considered by definition, it may result in new ideas for space exploration/research.
 

Wolfshadw

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Apr 1, 2020
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I believe, the Big Bang Theory is the most accepted theory for the start of the universe, Life as we understand it, did not exist at the start of the universe. Therefore, we can assume that life did have a "start". Where and when that was, is unknown.

Is there something in general?

Would space organizations / Universities etc be interested in suggestions from the public?
A quick Google search found this. There may be others.
ESA - Wanted: Your Ideas for ESA’s future space missions

-Wolf sends
 
Jun 13, 2021
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I believe, the Big Bang Theory is the most accepted theory for the start of the universe, Life as we understand it, did not exist at the start of the universe. Therefore, we can assume that life did have a "start". Where and when that was, is unknown.


A quick Google search found this. There may be others.
ESA - Wanted: Your Ideas for ESA’s future space missions

-Wolf sends
Thank you for the link!

With regard the Big Bang theory being valid, it appears to be a sensitive topic on this forum ;)
 
Jun 13, 2021
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Therefore, we can assume that life did have a "start". Where and when that was, is unknown.
With regard life having a 'start' in time. Is that idea merely based on the assumption that the Big Bang theory must be valid or do you have a theorethical argumentation as foundation for the idea?

Is there a study planned as of today to test whether 🌎 Earth life is possible farther away from Earth?

What could explain that as of 2021, no animal, insect or bacteria traveled farther than the 🌒 Moon?

Could it be that it was tested but that the results were never published?

Is this forum the right source to discover an answer to the question, or would it be best to try an alternative source to find a conclusive answer to the question of this topic? (I also tried Quora, a science forum of Cambridge, UK and philosophy forums, with the same answer: the farthest distance being the Moon).
 

Wolfshadw

Moderator
Apr 1, 2020
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With regard life having a 'start' in time. Is that idea merely based on the assumption that the Big Bang theory must be valid or do you have a theorethical argumentation as foundation for the idea?
As I stated in my previous reply, the BBT is the currently most accepted theory. If you choose to accept that, then there is a definite start to life. Again, where and when that might have been is an unknown.

If you do not accept the BBT as the origin for the universe, then I have nothing else to offer.

Is there a study planned as of today to test whether 🌎 Earth life is possible farther away from Earth?
Unknown (to me).

What could explain that as of 2021, no animal, insect or bacteria traveled farther than the 🌒 Moon?
We have never deliberately attempted to move Earth-based life beyond the reach of lunar orbit. We know that long-term space travel (even in Earth orbit) can be detrimental to human life. I'm sure some would say it's inhumane to deliberately send another life form on an extended journey just to test for it's survival.

Is this forum the right source to discover an answer to the question, or would it be best to try an alternative source to find a conclusive answer to the question of this topic? (I also tried Quora, a science forum of Cambridge, UK and philosophy forums, with the same answer: the farthest distance being the Moon).
I'd keep an eye out for any upcoming "Ask Me Anything" threads. We do have the occasional visit from experts in the Space and Science community and they love to answer questions like these (to the best of their ability)!

-Wolf sends
 

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