What is the name of the supernova that created our solar sys

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holcrazm

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Please could someone tell me the name,if there is one, of the supernova that created our Solar system.
 
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MeteorWayne

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It is unknown which (if any) nearby supernova increased the gas density that led to the creation of our solar system. In any case, it would have occurred over 4.6 billion years ago, so even if there is a remnant left, it would be undetectable. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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yevaud

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As Wayne says.<br /><br />The important ingredient in this mix is that the proto-stellar dust/gas cloud that became the Solar System contains elements from a Supernova. But a Supernova is not a necessary requirement otherwise for the formation of a Solar System. The Supernova that contributed heavier elements to the Dust/Gas cloud could be 5 Billions years prior.<br /><br />Solar Systems initially accrete due to Van Der Waals forces, until enough matter has collected together that Gravity takes over. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Differential Diagnosis:  </em>"<strong><em>I am both amused and annoyed that you think I should be less stubborn than you are</em></strong>."<br /> </p> </div>
 
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dragon04

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Our Sun was born in a stellar nursery of unknown origin.<br /><br />The famous Hubble image of the "Pillars of Creation" will show you what a stellar nursery is.<br /><br />The interesting part is that there's no Nebula (stellar nursery) close by that we can positively identify as the one we came from.<br /><br />Maybe we came from the Pillars of Creation. Maybe we came from the Horsehead Nebula. Or maybe a smaller one that isn't there anymore.<br /><br />But I think it's safe to say that our Sun was not formed from a single supernova. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <em>"2012.. Year of the Dragon!! Get on the Dragon Wagon!".</em> </div>
 
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3488

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Thats true.<br /><br />I doubt the nebula that gave birth to the Sun & siblings still exists after 4.6 billion years.<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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themage

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If I remember correctly, we were actually part of a mini galaxy that was gobbled up by the Milky Way. So we are the aliens in our own galaxy.
 
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MeteorWayne

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That is not correct. A few websites misinterpreted a news release earlier this year and stated that, but it was incorrect. The fact that we orbit in the plane of the galaxy shows we have always been part of the Milky Way <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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themage

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Ahhh, I didn't know that was incorrect. I read it on SDC a few months back.
 
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weeman

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I read that post as well, I looked past it with ease, I never thought in any way that we were simply part of another galaxy that was passing through!<br /><br />Without doing any research, I will state that my personal belief is that our solar system was not born by any one supernova.<br /><br />Our current theories suggest that supernovae play a key roll for creating the necessary elements of life. Without supernovae, we may not exist here today, life may not exist at all. Supernovae are massive factories that produce important elements like carbon, iron, and oxygen. When they die off, they eject these elements for hundreds of lightyears into space.<br /><br />So, it is hard to say exactly where the oxygen, iron, and carbon on Earth originated from.<br /><br />"We're all star stuff." -Carl Sagan <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><strong><font color="#ff0000">Techies: We do it in the dark. </font></strong></p><p><font color="#0000ff"><strong>"Put your hand on a stove for a minute and it seems like an hour. Sit with that special girl for an hour and it seems like a minute. That's relativity.</strong><strong>" -Albert Einstein </strong></font></p> </div>
 
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dragon04

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<font color="yellow">That is not correct. A few websites misinterpreted a news release earlier this year and stated that, but it was incorrect. The fact that we orbit in the plane of the galaxy shows we have always been part of the Milky Way</font><br /><br />Just so. If we were an orphan of something that passed through the MW at an oblique vector, I would think that our orbit around the galactic center would be unusually inclined relative to the ecliptic.<br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <em>"2012.. Year of the Dragon!! Get on the Dragon Wagon!".</em> </div>
 
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robnissen

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<font color="yellow">The interesting part is that there's no Nebula (stellar nursery) close by that we can positively identify as the one we came from.</font><br /><br />It would be shear coincidence if we came from a steller nursury relatively close by. The sun is currently on about its 20th orbit around the Milky Way. Thus the sun could have been born in any part of the Milky Way, including on the exact opposite side. There is one exception, however, it is highly unlikely that it was born in the MW halo due 1) to its relatively high metal content, and most stars in the halo are very low in metals, and 2) to a lesser extent its fairly planer orbit, if it formed in the halo, it would be difficult for random gravitational forces to have it end up with a planer orbit.
 
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heyscottie

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But the nursery would have been making the same orbit. So it stands to reason that if we were born in a prototypical stellar nursery, that either it has disspated, or we were ejected from it at some point long ago.
 
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MeteorWayne

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While it's likely the nursery was making close to the same orbit, there's no reason that the suparnovae had to be. And once the stars formed, they could have been ejected from the nursery on different enough orbits that 20 trips around the galaxy later they are not nearby, or can even be traced back.<br /><br />MW <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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yevaud

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Precisely what I (turgidly) was trying to express earlier.<br /><br />[Thank God for people with clarity skills] <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Differential Diagnosis:  </em>"<strong><em>I am both amused and annoyed that you think I should be less stubborn than you are</em></strong>."<br /> </p> </div>
 
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nimbus

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Is the local bubble unrelated to this hypothetical supernova? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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3488

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Hi Nimbus,<br /><br />Yes eburacum45 is correct. <br /><br />Our Solar System is just passing through The Local Bubble. Totally unrelated.<br /><br />Also our Solar System is passing through the Ursa Major Moving Group. Also totally unrelated.<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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nimbus

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Thanks to you both. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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