What math do real professional Space people use?

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nexius

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Space people is quite broad, but sometimes I get annoyed with having to learn imaginary numbers and all this dumb stuff that goes along with our Algebra 2 curriculum. What do I actaully need to know to be an engineer? Do they actaully use all these crazy formulas once they get out of school ? <br /><br />Thanks guys,
 
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vogon13

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Bessel functions!<br /><br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#ff0000"><strong>TPTB went to Dallas and all I got was Plucked !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#339966"><strong>So many people, so few recipes !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#0000ff"><strong>Let's clean up this stinkhole !!</strong></font> </p> </div>
 
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nexius

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crap I was hoping you would say math is pointless <img src="/images/icons/frown.gif" /> lol. <br /><br />this is a perfect example of pointlessness, (5+3i) + (2+4i) who needs to know that?
 
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vogon13

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In sparky school I used the <i>i</i> numbers, and they do accurately and usefully describe what is going on in AC circuits.<br /><br />Just because -1 doesn't have a square root, doesn't mean the quantity described forthwith tain't useful.<br /><br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#ff0000"><strong>TPTB went to Dallas and all I got was Plucked !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#339966"><strong>So many people, so few recipes !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#0000ff"><strong>Let's clean up this stinkhole !!</strong></font> </p> </div>
 
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billslugg

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Nexius<br />Yes, some of us do use this in our everyday lives. Imaginary numbers (using the square root of -1) allow us an additional dimension to describe certain phenomena. Describing the voltage and current in three phase power distribution systems comes to mind. Differential calculus allows us to model rates of change, integral calculus provides insights on accumulated amounts. Tensor calculus models all of this in three dimensions, plus rates of rotation, plus rates of change of rotation, plus divergence, plus rates of change of divergence. A type of math called symmetrical components (discovered in 1918) (combining some discussed above) can model the transients occurring in a power line after a lightning strike. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p> </p> </div>
 
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vogon13

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In 'real life' there is no such thing as algebra.<br /><br />Engineering on the other hand . . . . <br /><br /><br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#ff0000"><strong>TPTB went to Dallas and all I got was Plucked !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#339966"><strong>So many people, so few recipes !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#0000ff"><strong>Let's clean up this stinkhole !!</strong></font> </p> </div>
 
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nexius

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oh.. <img src="/images/icons/frown.gif" /> I had a friend that used to help build robots and didnt know math very well. I guess its just what type job your doing depends on the utilzation of that mathematic princpal.
 
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nexius

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oh... crap i dont know if i cud make it through all those math classes of hard stuff i guess we'll see what grade I have in pre calculus next year and go from their
 
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Leovinus

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You need to learn math so that when you grow up you can help your kids with their homework and not look like a moron. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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bdewoody

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All the "useless crap" you are learning now is the foundation upon which all higher math is built. If you are satisfied with just working on an assembly line building the cool stuff the others design don't bother with the higher math, otherwise develope a good understanding of what those equations mean or you will be left out of the loop. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <em><font size="2">Bob DeWoody</font></em> </div>
 
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