What telescope?

Status
Not open for further replies.
L

lucas_900

Guest
I have a small telescope but have had a lot of disappointment with it as I can not really find anything apart from the moon which I get some great views off. I'm looking at spending some cash to buy a better telescope with GOTO abilities and preferably one that cna be linked up to my computer.<br /><br />I don't want it to be massively expensive (about £300 is my budget) but I do want to be able to see some deep sky objects, i.e. a few nebulae and some galaxies, especially ther sombrero galaxy. I know this is a tall order and i'm not expecting anything magorly clear, but just to be able to see it would be nice.<br /><br />Im an amateur so I don't really know how much i am going to need to spend. If there is something a bit out of my price range that fills my criteria tell me about it. I'd really appreciate some images taken with it too so I can really see what it can do. Also personal reviews would be good i.e. this is good because... bad because... so that I can make an informed decision.<br /><br />Thanks for the help :)
 
B

bbrock

Guest
Perhaps the very least expensive option you would have is to combine Starry Night Pro software with the Orion Intelliscope. The Intelliscope is on a Dobsonian base which gives you that easy flexability. It also easily communicates with Starry Night. The difference is that you gide the scope by hand, like you would any Dobsonian telescope. <br /><br />The price range for Starry Night Pro is $150. The least expensive Intelliscope with object locator is is the 6 inch SkyQuest XT6 for $500. You get the whole thing for $650. The other intelliscopes are:<br /><br />SkyQuest XT8 ( 8" ) for $479 + $150 locator<br />SkyQuest XT10 (10") for $649 + $150 locator<br />SkyQuest XT12 (12") for $ 949 + $150 locator<br /><br />The Orion setup is the least expensive that I know of. I personally own the XT10 and this is a fine scope. However I need to warn you. Viewing a galaxy through an eye piece is not the same as looking at a color picture from a time exposure. Most galaxies, even the closest and brightest, look like a dim fuzzy spot in the sky.<br /><br />Visit Orion web site at www.telescope.com<br /><br />Clear Skies<br />Bill
 
N

nevers

Guest
Hi Lucas,<br /><br />Welcome to SDC. I'll just say this - stay away from "GoTo" - they will not be what you probably expect and are not as easy to use as advertised. My advice...go to Cloudy Nights and read up on some telescopes. Also, here at SDC there is another thread regarding Telescope Reviews and Equipment & the "So you want to buy a telescope" thread.<br /><br />This is another great place to help with picking a telescope: Orion - Product Selection Wizard<br /><br />But, my best advice would be to find an Astronomy Club in your area and attend a Star Party. That way, you can look at the 'scopes in person and see what kind of views each of them offer before you buy. You'll also see how each of them operate and talk to other amateur astronomers as well.<br /><br />I would also hope after you've made your choice, that you come back and tell us about it and don't be a stranger!
 
S

someone_else

Guest
Can I add on to this question? I am such a newbie fan of the stars. I have read a couple of astonomy books but I am having difficulty understanding telescopes, how they work, the lingo involved and what would be the best telescope option for me. I live in a vastly populated area in the West so light pollution is a factor. I would love to be able to learn how to take those spectacular photos! Would one of you be willing to help me with some advice?
 
S

someone_else

Guest
Thank you so much for the excellent websites. From your recommendation, and my reading, I think you are right on about the 8" f/6 reflector. It definitely fits the profile of what I want to look at. But, it seems awfully large! What about if I want to take it out to the desert? Do I need to get one of those Cassegrain-Schmidt telescopes too? Also, I am confused about astrophotography and how it works. How do you "mount" a camera onto a telescope? And how does it actually take pictures? <br /><br />Sorry for my naivete but I am just learning...
 
T

tfwthom

Guest
Forget about astrophotography for now!!!!!<br /><br />You need to spend time looking through your scope before even thinking about taking pictures.<br /><br />Astrophotography will drive you nuts and is expensive. (CCD or film) Astrophotographers are masochists. Astrophotography can test one's patience and dedication to the limits and at the same time be both satisfying and rewarding. <br /><br />Save you sanity and just look at the pictures someone else has taken. <br /><br />http://uplink.space.com/showflat.php?Cat=&Board=askastronomer&Number=7962&page=0&view=collapsed&sb=5&o=0&fpart=<br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font size="1" color="#3366ff">www.siriuslookers.org</font> </div>
 
S

someone_else

Guest
Hahaha! That's too funny...I am not planning on getting into it just yet; it was more of a question for my comprehension.
 
S

someone_else

Guest
I can put my digital camera up to the eyepiece? I didn't know that pictures could be taken that way...do I need some special software to make the most of those shots?
 
S

someone_else

Guest
I did read the thread but it seemed to me that there was a special software involved...something called RegiStack(?) Is that widely available? Do I need to be very familiar with computers to use it? <br /><br />Can I just point my digital camera at an object through one of the magnification eyepieces and take a photo that way?
 
N

nevers

Guest
Yes - it can be done. The software: RegiStax is FREE software. Astrophotography taken hand-held through-the-eyepiece (afocal) is tricky at best but it can certainly be done. Attaching your digital camera to Orion's SteadyPix™ Universal Camera Mount would improve your photos. You'll also need a equatorial mounted telescope and a single-axis tracking motor of some kind. But, the most important thing you'll need is patience and hair restoration medication.
 
S

someone_else

Guest
I am so glad I came to this site! Y'all are too funny! And thanks for taking the time to answer my questions...I know they probably seem ridiculously easy to you! <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" />
 
N

nevers

Guest
We're glad you came here too...but...I'm sure others would wonder what's so funny. Answering questions is what we do best...I think...sometimes...to some people...ok, maybe second best...besides being funny. Your questions are not ridiculous...we've all had them before and probably got most of our answers from here! The dumbest question is the question not asked.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

ASK THE COMMUNITY

Latest posts