What would happen if a supernatural being immune to gravity, radiation, temperature, goes past beyond the event horizon of a black hole

Jun 25, 2020
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OK this question might feel wired.

Let's assume there's a supernatural being immune to any amount of gravity, radiation, Temperature. We'll call him Jake (Gravity, Radiation, Temperature doesn't have any effect on his body).

Now if he tries to go past beyond the event horizon of a black hole, what would happen?

Will he crash on the surface of the most densest & strongest object in the universe.

Or

Will he just phase through it.
 
May 4, 2020
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I think he will just phase through it.
The Science Fiction entity ^conjectured by this thread creator typically has awesome powers, and as seen in fictional works such as a particular Original Series Star Trek episode (title escapes my memory), 'plays god' while at the same time being so morally unresponsible and immature as to be a danger to all around him.
Jake would not only be immune to Natural Law in the material universe, but he would also have the power to manipulate material objects at will. Therefore, to avoid impossible eventualities such as portrayed in the mystery Star Trek episode, he would need mature and responsible 'adult' overseers, parental figures endowed with the necessary morals to prevent them from destroying the entire Universe (or that part of the Universe within their domain).
If OTOH Jake had no need of such parental oversights, then he must already possess perfectly sterling character traits and morals so as to prevent him from becoming like the cosmic brat in the aforementioned Star Trek episode.
We arrive at a reasonably durable self-evident 'truism'; 'To be capable of destroying the Universe by mental powers, you have to be so perfect and free of evil notions as to not desire to do so in the first place'. My 'proof' is that the Universe as we know it does not currently seem in any danger of being destroyed by any such entity. Like the joke about the man who sits on a park bench and tears up each page of his newspaper after reading it and scatters the pieces all around on the grass, 'to keep the elephants away' (we see no elephants, ergo; the trick works), in similar mental gyrations, the Universe and us in it still exists, therefore the notion of such irresponsible entities as the Star Trek enfant terrible being on the loose and bent on universal destruction is not to be feared.
In more direct answer to the thread's question, the super-being would pass through such material objects as black holes with impunity, and would have no desire to meddle with it.
I seem to visualize this as a sort of 'Catch-22'; to be capable of such super powers, is to be morally beyond the desire to wreak havoc in the Universe (i.e. 'Why bother?' and 'What is the point?'); whereas to have the will and the desire to do so, becomes a self-defeating Law of Nature preventing anyone willing to destroy Nature from becoming capable of doing so.
To be capable of such power and immunity in the first place, Jake would have to have a moral character so incorrupt that he would not wish to do so, viewing the very idea as virtually unthinkable.
This is all just off the top of my head. I have such a one-track mind that I don't seem oft capable of 'thinking' and 'admiring' at the same time; it's either 'the one or the other'.
 
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May 4, 2020
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^Good one. I don't know if it's the phraseology; 'Like a good neighbor, State Farm Is There', but the two insurance agents' cheap con job sales pitch allusion to 'super being' religiosity really tripped my funny bone.
 
Oct 24, 2020
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if you move in a black hole you will not come out from other side two gas that come together will make it harder for anyone to go into a black hole as the black hole will pull you so far in to it and you will dispear inside and you there no saying what would happen if you do.
 
Nov 16, 2020
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It would be such a traumatic trip, he'd have a stroke and die. We shoulda made Jake unaffected by heart disease and blood clotting, dang it.
 
Nov 6, 2020
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I think he will just phase through it.
The Science Fiction entity ^conjectured by this thread creator typically has awesome powers, and as seen in fictional works such as a particular Original Series Star Trek episode (title escapes my memory), 'plays god' while at the same time being so morally unresponsible and immature as to be a danger to all around him.
Jake would not only be immune to Natural Law in the material universe, but he would also have the power to manipulate material objects at will. Therefore, to avoid impossible eventualities such as portrayed in the mystery Star Trek episode, he would need mature and responsible 'adult' overseers, parental figures endowed with the necessary morals to prevent them from destroying the entire Universe (or that part of the Universe within their domain).
If OTOH Jake had no need of such parental oversights, then he must already possess perfectly sterling character traits and morals so as to prevent him from becoming like the cosmic brat in the aforementioned Star Trek episode.
We arrive at a reasonably durable self-evident 'truism'; 'To be capable of destroying the Universe by mental powers, you have to be so perfect and free of evil notions as to not desire to do so in the first place'. My 'proof' is that the Universe as we know it does not currently seem in any danger of being destroyed by any such entity. Like the joke about the man who sits on a park bench and tears up each page of his newspaper after reading it and scatters the pieces all around on the grass, 'to keep the elephants away' (we see no elephants, ergo; the trick works), in similar mental gyrations, the Universe and us in it still exists, therefore the notion of such irresponsible entities as the Star Trek enfant terrible being on the loose and bent on universal destruction is not to be feared.
In more direct answer to the thread's question, the super-being would pass through such material objects as black holes with impunity, and would have no desire to meddle with it.
I seem to visualize this as a sort of 'Catch-22'; to be capable of such super powers, is to be morally beyond the desire to wreak havoc in the Universe (i.e. 'Why bother?' and 'What is the point?'); whereas to have the will and the desire to do so, becomes a self-defeating Law of Nature preventing anyone willing to destroy Nature from becoming capable of doing so.
To be capable of such power and immunity in the first place, Jake would have to have a moral character so incorrupt that he would not wish to do so, viewing the very idea as virtually unthinkable.
This is all just off the top of my head. I have such a one-track mind that I don't seem oft capable of 'thinking' and 'admiring' at the same time; it's either 'the one or the other'.
The Star Trek episode: Squire of Gothos. S01 E17.
The premise of Jake is hypothetical. So no elephant gyrations need apply. Cue the visual. 🐘:eek:
 
IMO a black hole is only a compression of quantum fluctuation.
Compressed fluctuation=compressed time.
When he gets past the event horizon time would run very slow and almost stop.
I think that is the reason black holes don't shrink forever, because forever is compressed into forever.
Nothing special would happen other than a very long next day LOL
 
Nov 28, 2020
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I have NO degree. I am amazed and humbled by all the responses here. But I do agree with everyone has an opinion. Some day we will know what happens when we approach and enter a Black Hole. Until than, someone's opinion will be correct or close to the target.
If we think of a Black Hole as Dark Matter, than positive energy entering a Black Hole would be annihilated. Right?
 
I have NO degree. I am amazed and humbled by all the responses here. But I do agree with everyone has an opinion. Some day we will know what happens when we approach and enter a Black Hole. Until than, someone's opinion will be correct or close to the target.
If we think of a Black Hole as Dark Matter, than positive energy entering a Black Hole would be annihilated. Right?
I don't think it's possible to actually enter a black hole.
Either you become a steam of atoms, or time simply slows to an ever slowing pace that never allows you to make it to the surface of a black hole.
Or both :)

My thinking is that classical physics dropped the ball on black holes.
No sigularity, no event horizon, no infinite mass or they would consume the entire universe.

Something stops a black hole shrinking forever and IMO that something is the space or time in quantum fluctuation activity.

The black hole becomes simple math, compression= < time, more compression even less time. any event in a black hole takes a very long time.
A self regulated system that doesn't really stop a black hole from shrinking forever, it simply takes forever to do so.

JMO
 
If Jake has no mass, presumably he (it?) will not be affected so can enter and leave at will. Don't get a headache over this. Jake is entirely hypothetical and has no connection, real or implied, with a BH.

Cat :)
 
I tend to think that a black hole is densely compressed matter and with that densely compressed time/space/activity.
A well of time compression so no going through exists, just slower and slower time as you go deeper.

Even imaginary Jake will have trouble with endless time no matter what he is made of. :)
 

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