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which binoculars are best

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homeschooler

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We are kinda new at this and would like to know what would be the best most affordable binocs to see the night sky. We live in a rural area and have a great view of the night sky with just the naked eye. However we are ready to move on. My 8 year old is really into this and my 16 year old is getting more interested every day. Thanks
 
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tfwthom

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A good bet would be either 8x40 or 8x50 or 10x50 Porro prism binoculars. (first number is magnification, second number is objective lens) Porro prism are better for the night sky because they don't lose as much light in the prism as roof prism do. Roof prism are good for daylight/birding.<br /><br />The higher the magnification the harder they are to hold steady. I don't have a problem with 10x some people do.<br /><br />Stay away for the ones saying "ruby coated" and such they are usually junk.<br /><br />These would be good Nikon 8x40 <br /><br />or Nikon 10x50 <br /><br /><br />I just bought these Nikon 10x50 waterproof <br /><br />I also ordered these for birding at the same time Bushnell <br /><br />I wanted waterproof because they don't fog/dew on the inside. (had this happen with cheaper binos)<br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font size="1" color="#3366ff">www.siriuslookers.org</font> </div>
 
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six_strings

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Crazyeddie makes a good recomendation with those Orion Scenix... I'd go with a 10x50... if you have any kind of reasonably stable tripod would be a bonus! <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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tfwthom

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General bino info:<br /><br />Using binoculars by Richard Talcott<br /><br />Portable and relatively inexpensive, binoculars offer great views of the Moon, comets, Milky Way star fields, and large deep-sky objects.<br /><br /><br />Ask someone what equipment they need to start exploring the night sky and, 99 times out of 100, they'll fire back "telescope" as the answer. Although a telescope may seem the logical choice, there's an alternative that in many respects works better. Binoculars are highly versatile instruments that can reveal craters on the Moon, moons orbiting Jupiter, Milky Way starfields, and even other galaxies.<br /><br />In many ways, binoculars prove superior to a telescope for those starting out in astronomy. They have a wide field of view and provide right-side-up images, making objects easy to find. They require no effort or expertise to set up — just sling them around your neck, step outside, and you're ready to go. That portability also makes binoculars ideal for those clear nights in the middle of the week when you don't have the time — or inclination — to get out a telescope. And for most people, observing with two eyes open rather than one seems more natural and comfortable.<br /><br />If that still hasn't convinced you, maybe price will. Unless you have money to burn on image-stabilized models, binoculars offer a more affordable way to tour the heavens than a telescope. If you're a parent hoping to foster a child's interest in the universe, binoculars are the ticket. Even if the appeal of stargazing eventually wanes, binoculars can be used for more down-to-Earth pursuits. <br /> <br />Before you purchase binoculars, you'll need to understand a few basics. Aperture is the most important binocular specification, at least in those intended for stargazing. Aperture describes the diameter of the front lenses. The larger the diameter, the brighter the resulting images. Astronomical binoculars should have a diameter of at least 40 millimeters (mm). Those with <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font size="1" color="#3366ff">www.siriuslookers.org</font> </div>
 
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kyle_baron

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Holding the binoculars steady, is very important. Otherwise the whole field of view bobs up and down, and around. I usually lean against my shed or house, to stabilize the view. I also have built a stand for my binoculars out of a drywall pole sander, and an aluminum paint extension pole. You can also buy winged eyeguards from Orion that block out stray peripheral light. I have a 8x40 Orion Scenix and 10x50 Orion Vista. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font size="4"><strong></strong></font></p> </div>
 
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six_strings

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Just in case some may be unaware... on most models the front cap, where the two halves join and articulate, comes off to reveal a threaded mount hole... I made a simple L bracket to attach this to a simple but sturdy run-of-the-mill camera tripod... I only mention this cuz the docs that come with most binoculars do not point this out! And it is very well concealed <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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Our astronomy club has an amazing binocular mount which allows you to point at an object and move up and down without losing the target. Steadies the binocs and allows you to move around for diffently verticalized observers without having to re-aim. If you're going >50mm it might be a good investment. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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