Would they bring the Rovers back from Mars?

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willpittenger

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If a core were to be close to coming down on its own, do we have a way to bring it down safely? I figure that even if an orbiter like Endeavour were to reach its orbit, the orbiter would need extra radiation shielding. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <hr style="margin-top:0.5em;margin-bottom:0.5em" />Will Pittenger<hr style="margin-top:0.5em;margin-bottom:0.5em" />Add this user box to your Wikipedia User Page to show your support for the SDC forums: <div style="margin-left:1em">{{User:Will Pittenger/User Boxes/Space.com Account}}</div> </div>
 
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JonClarke

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All the remaining spent Russian are in high disposal orbits so this is not an immediate issue. The high gamma emission might be a problem for a manned spacecraft. Maybe some kind of unmanned retrieval mission could be designed when recovery is required.<br /><br />Jon <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Whether we become a multi-planet species with unlimited horizons, or are forever confined to Earth will be decided in the twenty-first century amid the vast plains, rugged canyons and lofty mountains of Mars</em>  Arthur Clarke</p> </div>
 
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