A mind teasing one

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abhinavkumar_iitr05

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I don't remember whether I have posted the question before or not and so I am posting it again.If I have posted it before then please inform me.My question reads as follows<br /><br /><font color="yellow"> Why the universe on a large scale so uniform but on a small scale so non-uniform? </font><br /><br /><font color="black"> I was going through the book </font><font color="red"> A BRIEF HISTORY OF TIME </font><font color="black"> when I got this question </font>/safety_wrapper>
 
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newtonian

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abhinavkumar_iitr05 - It isn't.<br /><br />The universe on a large scale is not uniform. There are many interesting and surprising structures on a large scale:<br /><br />"Still another problem for the big bang has come from steadily mounting evidence of “bubbles” in the universe that are 100 million light-years in size, with galaxies on the outside and voids inside. Margaret Geller, John Huchra, and others at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics have found what they call a great wall of galaxies some 500 million light-years in length across the northern sky. Another group of astronomers, who became known as the Seven Samurai, have found evidence of a different cosmic conglomeration, which they call the Great Attractor, located near the southern constellations of Hydra and Centaurus. Astronomers Marc Postman and Tod Lauer believe something even bigger must lie beyond the constellation Orion, causing hundreds of galaxies, including ours, to stream in that direction like rafts on a sort of “river in space.”<br /><br />All this structure is baffling. Cosmologists say the blast from the big bang was extremely smooth and uniform, according to the background radiation it allegedly left behind. How could such a smooth start have led to such massive and complex structures? “The latest crop of walls and attractors intensifies the mystery of how so much structure could have formed within the 15-billion-year age of the universe,” admits Scientific American—a problem that only gets worse as Freedman and others roll back the estimated age of the cosmos still more." - "Awake!," 1/22/96, p. 5.<br /><br />Remember, our observable universe is not much larger than that 500 million light year long "Great Wall." The observable universe only extends about 26 times longer than that!<br /><br />It is likely far more structure extends beyond our observable universe.<br /><br />There is, however, something that is true of the universe on a large scale but not a small scale:<br /><br />(Isaia
 
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