Ares 1X launch Oct 27th

Page 8 - Seeking answers about space? Join the Space community: the premier source of space exploration, innovation, and astronomy news, chronicling (and celebrating) humanity's ongoing expansion across the final frontier.
Status
Not open for further replies.
C

CalliArcale

Guest
job1207":1tgjdyuv said:
yes, well that is why the main engine took out the second stage. Splat, LOC, end of flight. You can see it clearly on that video. and it was clearly a re ignition.
I know what you're seeing, but how can you say it was "clearly" a reignition? Engine plumes aren't always easily visible, especially on a tumbling solid. The thrust at the tail end of a solid's burn can be a tad erratic. I don't think the booster reignited; I think it just hadn't finished burning out yet, which should be expected and means they cannot consider this an unusual event; it will need to be considered when designing the final, production Ares 1 rocket.

To me, the first stage's burnout didn't look particularly unusual. You see exactly the same thing during Shuttle SRB sep. As docm put it, "With solids MECO is an event without clear boundaries."
 
T

trailrider

Guest
CalliArcale":2hrmekzg said:
job1207":2hrmekzg said:
yes, well that is why the main engine took out the second stage. Splat, LOC, end of flight. You can see it clearly on that video. and it was clearly a re ignition.
I know what you're seeing, but how can you say it was "clearly" a reignition? Engine plumes aren't always easily visible, especially on a tumbling solid. The thrust at the tail end of a solid's burn can be a tad erratic. I don't think the booster reignited; I think it just hadn't finished burning out yet, which should be expected and means they cannot consider this an unusual event; it will need to be considered when designing the final, production Ares 1 rocket.

To me, the first stage's burnout didn't look particularly unusual. You see exactly the same thing during Shuttle SRB sep. As docm put it, "With solids MECO is an event without clear boundaries."
I don't see much unusual in the tailoff of the 1st stage...very typical of SRB tailoff on a shuttle flight. I have been looking on the YouTube video taken from a downrange aircraft (check NASAWatch.com for the link), and I just don't see any real contact on separation.

As to the parachute issue: There is no question that one chute failed immediately on deployment. Looks to me like the risers either broke or perhaps the main deck fitting released on one side of the chute (shades of STS-4???). The other two chutes seemed to deploy properly, but the dang thing went into clouds, and I can't get a clear picture at the moment the second and third chute fully deployed, but in the reefed condition. Something then went haywire with the second chute. It looks like either a blown panel or, again, some failure of the risers on one side. But I can't get a clear view of it. It might have been something dealing with the reefing line cutter. But since the second chute appears to have disreefed, albeit with one side out, it could be something else. The other thing that is interesting is that that second chute almost looks like it got a riser line over the top of the canopy. I can't tell if the chutes use one reefing line or two (like the shuttle SRB's). Looks like only one to me. It would be nice if we got some better information coming from Pioneer Aerospace and/or NASA.

Interesting, nonetheless.
 
Z

Zipi

Guest
Here is the aerial video:

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A4l2wxbMEQg[/youtube]

Parachute system starts working after 4min.
 
T

trailrider

Guest
Anybody hear anything more from NASA or Pioneer Aerospace on the chutes?
 
D

docm

Guest
In the Aviation Week article I quote in the "Ares I-Y canceled" thread it also states;

But when the three main chutes pulled out, the risers on one of them broke and the chute deflated. The whipping risers fouled a second chute, which only inflated about halfway, Hanley said.

As a result, the recovery system dropped the first-stage nozzle much closer to the water than planned, and the stage splashed down so hard that it probably would not have been reusable had that been required.
 
J

jakethesnake

Guest
Here is for the most part a complete video of the Ares 1X taken from a small Cessna Skymaster which NASA had circling the launch site about 10 miles away… very, very, very cool video! This video even shows the parachutes opening and one of the chutes failing almost immediately after deployment. :eek:

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A4l2wxbMEQg[/youtube]
 
Z

Zipi

Guest
jakethesnake":enp8ulm1 said:
Here is for the most part a complete video of the Ares 1X taken from a small Cessna Skymaster which NASA had circling the launch site about 10 miles away… very, very, very cool video! This video even shows the parachutes opening and one of the chutes failing almost immediately after deployment. :eek:
I already posted that exactly same video 3 responses ago to this very same thread...

viewtopic.php?f=6&t=20171&start=160#p400261
 
J

jakethesnake

Guest
Zipi":eomrr321 said:
jakethesnake":eomrr321 said:
Here is for the most part a complete video of the Ares 1X taken from a small Cessna Skymaster which NASA had circling the launch site about 10 miles away… very, very, very cool video! This video even shows the parachutes opening and one of the chutes failing almost immediately after deployment. :eek:
I already posted that exactly same video 3 responses ago to this very same thread...

viewtopic.php?f=6&t=20171&start=160#p400261
Oops, sorry, yet mine is more descriptive off how and where this video was taken, ;) so here the article I got it from.

http://blogs.abcnews.com/scienceandsoci ... above.html
 
M

MeteorWayne

Guest
NASA Sets Briefing to Discuss Ares I-X Launch Data
HOUSTON -- NASA will host a media teleconference with Bob Ess, Ares I-X mission manager, at 1 p.m. CST on Thursday, Dec. 3. Ess will provide reporters with an update on data gathered during the test flight of the rocket, which took place Oct. 28 from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

The test flight lasted approximately six minutes, from launch until splashdown of the rocket's booster stage in the Atlantic Ocean nearly 150 miles away. The Ares I-X was wired with more than 700 sensors that gathered data during its flight. The launch gave NASA an opportunity to prove hardware, facilities and ground operations of the test rocket while providing engineers with critical data for future launch vehicles.

Audio from the teleconference will be streamed on NASA's Web site at:

http://www.nasa.gov/newsaudio

For more information about the Ares I-X rocket, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/aresIX

For more information about the Constellation Program, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/constellation
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

ASK THE COMMUNITY