Artificial Gravity

May 21, 2021
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Given that after many months on the ISS in micro gravity, Astro/Cosmonauts returning to Earth have to be assisted from the capsule and take a period of time to reacclimate to full gravity., and even knowing that Mars' gravity is less that that of Earth, shouldn't providing artificial gravity during the 6-8 month trip be as much a consideration as radiation protection, supplies, etc.?
 
Apr 16, 2021
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As far I am aware, the only way to provide artificial gravity is to spin the body of the spaceship. Given that the human body readjusts itself to gravity again, weightlessness may be the lesser evil than radiation poisoning and running out of oxygen.

What rate of spin would generate artificial gravity?

Clive
 

Wolfshadw

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Apr 1, 2020
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The problem with generating artificial gravity is that it is very expensive to test. First, you have to get a rather large habitat up there. You can't just put boosters on the side of the ISS and fire them to generate spin. The habitat has to be of sufficient size in order to generate an appropriate magnitude of simulated gravity. Getting all of that material up into space and then assembling it is probably on par with building three or more International Space Stations.

Even if you did have the financial support to put up a test lab, that's a lot of money to shove into something we have NO IDEA if it even works. In THEORY, yes, it should work, but how that actually affects the human body over a long period of time is anyone's guess. Once it's in motion, do we have any idea of whether or not it can be controlled? Can you imagine billions being spent on a habitat that once started goes out of control and becomes the largest piece of space junk in history or do we try to send up rescue missions? A testing habitat like this would easily cost more than the Hubble Telescope. Can you imagine where we'd be if the Hubble rescue missions were not successful?

Will we need to eventually? Most likely. Is it going to happen by the time we head to Mars? I doubt it. Hopefully, due to the lower gravity on Mars, the recovery time for Astro/Cosmonauts will be far shorter than when they return to Earth.

-Wolf sends

Wiki - Artificial Gravity
 
May 14, 2021
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I imagine that people who grow up and live on, let's say, Mars, will have much lighter physique due to less necessary lifting, etc., but the DNA will still make Earth size babies. Will that cause problems more so than it is already?
 
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Jun 1, 2020
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Since gravity and acceleration (artificial gravity) are one in the same, per Einstein, then the question becomes how does body and mind handle angular acceleration? At some minimum radius all should work fine. Two small buildings connected by a tube pass way could work without massive construction issues.

Better, IMO, is to constantly accelerate a large diameter ship to produce translation gravity.
 
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Wolfshadw

Moderator
Apr 1, 2020
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I imagine that people who grow up and live on, let's say, Mars, will have much lighter physique due to less necessary lifting, etc., but the DNA will still make Earth size babies. Will that cause problems more so than it is already?
Just my supposition here.

I would think that the lighter gravity would eventually mutate human DNA to the point where people would be shorter, but perhaps with longer limbs giving them better leverage. The decreased about of sunlight would probably, eventually, result in larger eyes so we could be more adept and seeing in lower light. Additionally, the lower levels of radiation would probably mean we wouldn't need as much melatonin in our skin cells. Our flesh might lose it's rosy completion and become more greyish.

[/snicker]

-Wolf sends
 

Catastrophe

The devil is in the detail
Feb 18, 2020
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Will Mars Colonists Evolve Into This New Kind of Human?
https://www.nbcnews.com › storyline › the-big-questions


28 Feb 2017 — Mars colonists might evolve into a new type of human, experts say. ... in the low-gravity environment, the colonists' bigger bones might ...


Homo Galacticus: How Space Will Shape The Humans of The ...
https://www.sciencealert.com › homo-galacticus-how-sp...


10 Apr 2020 — Human evolution is complicated. ... is a Harsh Mistress, away from the strictures of gravity we see humans evolving to be unnaturally tall, ...

Cat :)
 
May 14, 2021
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Actually the radiation levels will be higher at Mars. With the inverse square law, visible light may be lower, but, without the ozone layer, the UV and higher will be higher.
 
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Catastrophe

The devil is in the detail
Feb 18, 2020
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Skulking underground away from radiation and, of course, meteorites, Maybe homo sapiens superiosis (obviously no violations intended here) will develop a very thick shell, like tortoises, and crawl around on the Martian surface.

Cat :)
 
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Jul 27, 2021
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Will Mars Colonists Evolve Into This New Kind of Human?
https://www.nbcnews.com › storyline › the-big-questions


28 Feb 2017 — Mars colonists might evolve into a new type of human, experts say. ... in the low-gravity environment, the colonists' bigger bones might ...

Homo Galacticus: How Space Will Shape The Humans of The ...
https://www.sciencealert.com › homo-galacticus-how-sp...


10 Apr 2020 — Human evolution is complicated. ... is a Harsh Mistress, away from the strictures of gravity we see humans evolving to be unnaturally tall, ...

Cat :)
There are also indications even that humans on Mars might gain a mutation that raises their survival advantage.
There is existing fact: former NASA astronaut Scott Kelly. He lived for a year on the International Space Station, which was enough to bring some changes in his DNA.
Humans are thought to be the most adaptive known creatures.
Also (!): interactions with new evolved Martians may endanger populace mutually. In the same way like the European settlers who gave smallpox to the Native Americans.
New races ... terrific.
 
May 21, 2021
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I would expect exercise machines, similar to those on the ISS, will likely be the best way to avoid muscle atrophy.
Exactly my point... Astronauts exercise at least 2 hours per day, yet still need to be carried off of the return vessels after 6-8 months on the ISS.
 
Jul 30, 2021
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Is gravity is good and by introducing gravity to spaceflight, a lot of these things that we need countermeasures for, such as you talked about bone loss, muscle loss, right now, that mitigation strategy, that countermeasure is exercise, a combination of aerobic and resistive. That countermeasure perhaps needs to be replaced or reduced with the introduction of artificial gravity because gravity then becomes the countermeasure.
 
Jul 27, 2021
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Neuroscience research shows that gravity 'is involved not just in recognition, but also in physical understanding of objects and scenes.
Not only physical effects take a role, but our perception of surrounding objects behaviour, orientation. The world does not appear to rotate when the head tilts. Visual changes may be dramatic in low gravity. Literally, the alignment in eye-centered coordinates gets lost.
 

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