Atmospheric Lag

Status
Not open for further replies.
J

jschaef5

Guest
Alright I am not sure if astronomers are the right people to ask this but many of you know a lot about earth sciences so anyways...<br /><br />How much does the upper atmosphere lag behind the earths rotation. There has to be some friction involved that would make it so that the closer to the earth the less the lag.<br /><br />When flying you have to slightly account for the earths rotation under you if on a long duration flight which leads me to this conclusion that the earths atmosphere isn't perfectly rotated with the earth because planes fly relative to the air not the earth. Is there like a definitive equation to calculate this effect... Coriolis effect. Maybe an equation with difference in surface velocity to air molecules speed as a function of altitude, or just in general is it very much or does the atmosphere mostly move with the earth.<br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
V

vogon13

Guest
Why wouldn't the atmosphere for the most part rotate with the earth?<br /><br />Does it rub on heaven?<br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#ff0000"><strong>TPTB went to Dallas and all I got was Plucked !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#339966"><strong>So many people, so few recipes !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#0000ff"><strong>Let's clean up this stinkhole !!</strong></font> </p> </div>
 
J

jschaef5

Guest
I am not sure, but from what I have learned it does... <br /><br />I believe it's due to the air moving in relation to the earth in the first place. Like hot air moving to cold but the earth is also moving under this which makes it curve. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

ASK THE COMMUNITY