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How To Can someone help me visualize the General Theory of Relativity in 3 dimensions?

Apr 5, 2020
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We all know about the General Theory of Relativity. It was proposed by Albert Einstein, the most controversial physicist of all time. The theory is the best theory (till now) we have got about Gravity. There's no better theory about Gravity than this till now, accepted by a majority of the Scientific Community. Till now, we have described GR like this:
But, you know, I find this image of GR to be kind of vague. Because, you know, it's kind of 2-dimensional, which contains only Latitude and Longitude. We all know that there are infinite planes in the universe, this is just one plane. I want to visualize it in a 3D way which consists Altitude as well. Can anyone help me visualize it in a 3-dimensional way?

PS: It would be good if you can help me visualize it in a 4D way as well, :)
 
Gosh! You do ask some questions. :)

Let's try a black hole. The normal representation falls down because you can only approach the bh on a flat plane like your diagram. Flat, that is, until you start getting closer.
Instead of looking down from above, and seeing a hole in the centre, imagine you are in space. You see (or don't see) a sphere into which matter is being drawn. You may see, according to some descriptions, a static image at the even horizon.
Anyway, to start answering your question, see a sphere which can be approached equally from any direction. What happens if you look at your bh on paper from underneath the paper. This problem disappears when you imagine it as a sphere. We'll have to leave any more dimensional jumps for the moment. :)
 
Gosh! You do ask some questions. :)

Let's try a black hole. The normal representation falls down because you can only approach the bh on a flat plane like your diagram. Flat, that is, until you start getting closer.
Instead of looking down from above, and seeing a hole in the centre, imagine you are in space. You see (or don't see) a sphere into which matter is being drawn. You may see, according to some descriptions, a static image at the even horizon.
Anyway, to start answering your question, see a sphere which can be approached equally from any direction. What happens if you look at your bh on paper from underneath the paper. This problem disappears when you imagine it as a sphere. We'll have to leave any more dimensional jumps for the moment. :)
 
Mar 5, 2020
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General Relativity uses geodesics.

Friends don’t let friends use geodesics.

To help you see in 4D I would have to get a medical release before doing the upgrade😊.

Current displays are in 2D and there are high level engineering programs that can move you through 3D models.

A fourth dimension can be ported through a haptic interface.

Einstein was said to be able to hold (not visualize) three and four dimensional objects in his mind. Your mind knows where your hands and feet are at all times. This (sense) can be repurposed as a non-visual form of spatial imagination. The amount of concentration required is not trivial. Some intellectually challenging professions have their people work with their hands in order to strengthen this talent.

Einstein appeared slow as a child so this talent can have a price.
 
Apr 5, 2020
137
71
160
Gosh! You do ask some questions. :)

Let's try a black hole. The normal representation falls down because you can only approach the bh on a flat plane like your diagram. Flat, that is, until you start getting closer.
Instead of looking down from above, and seeing a hole in the centre, imagine you are in space. You see (or don't see) a sphere into which matter is being drawn. You may see, according to some descriptions, a static image at the even horizon.
Anyway, to start answering your question, see a sphere which can be approached equally from any direction. What happens if you look at your bh on paper from underneath the paper. This problem disappears when you imagine it as a sphere. We'll have to leave any more dimensional jumps for the moment. :)
But, you know, I am trying to figure out why a plane that is going through the center of an object bend.
 
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But, you know, I am trying to figure out why a plane that is going through the center of an object bend.
If I understand correctly:
It is like we 'think' the Earth is flat - not actually, but the curvature is so slight that it is as if it were flat. My sphere is just like the Earth with all gravity pulling inwards (perpendicularly) towards the centre. Now you know that is a simplification so I will say I understand that gravity is directed towards the CoG and not the actual centre of the planet - also that large masses can distort gravity very slightly from that.
 
Oct 21, 2019
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We all know about the General Theory of Relativity. It was proposed by Albert Einstein, the most controversial physicist of all time. The theory is the best theory (till now) we have got about Gravity. There's no better theory about Gravity than this till now, accepted by a majority of the Scientific Community.
I disagree. IMO, the warping of “space” is a poor representation of gravity. It lends itself to many

But, you know, I find this image of GR to be kind of vague. Because, you know, it's kind of 2-dimensional, which contains only Latitude and Longitude. We all know that there are infinite planes in the universe, this is just one plane. I want to visualize it in a 3D way which consists Altitude as well. Can anyone help me visualize it in a 3-dimensional way?
That’s easy. I did that about 12 years ago. This is the 3D segment from a larger explanation.
In order for the wormhole/space travel concept to work, the wormhole would have to be a “shortcut” to another area of space. Now, this is not a mathematical explanation, but it explains graphically why the “fold in space/wormhole hypothesis is unrealistic in the real universe. The inaccurate and totally misleading misrepresentation of space as a flat sheet or membrane makes it look easy. But, space is not flat like a sheet of paper, it is solid like a bowling ball. It is easy to fold a sheet of paper, but not quite so easy to fold a bowling ball. IMO, too many people have taken the woefully inadequate 2D flat sheet model and applied it literally to the 3D Universe.

A better and more reasonable representation of space and gravity would be that of a giant sponge the size of the Universe. The effect of gravity (i.e. a star) would be like reaching in to a point deep within the sponge and pinching some of the sponge material. You would end up with a region of dense sponge at the point of the “pinch”, immediately surrounded by a region of rarified density which gradually reverts to the original density as you move further from the “pinch”. The density of the sponge surrounding the “pinch” is analogously inversely proportional to the gravitational force of the star. Notice that no matter how hard you pinch an area, it never brings it any closer to any other area. It only changes the density of the sponge in that immediate vicinity, and that change in density varies inversely with distance from the pinched area. With this more accurate model, all those notions about folding space vanish.
 

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