Comparing the path of the sun to the path of Jupiter

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NDO

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<p style="margin:0cm0cm0pt35.45pt;text-indent:-35.45pt" class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:10pt;color:black;font-family:'Verdana','sans-serif'">How can i calculate&nbsp;closely do the planets follow the sun? i have data over an extended time period for both the sun and Jupiter however cant find away to compare the paths. can someone please help or point me in the right direction</span></p><p style="margin:0cm0cm0pt35.45pt;text-indent:-35.45pt" class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:10pt;color:black;font-family:'Verdana','sans-serif'">cheers</span></p>
 
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Saiph

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<p>Well...It's a little hard to see what you mean.</p><p>Jupiter's orbit is very well plotted, and it orbits the sun...not the other way around.&nbsp; Any affects on the sun's "path" compared to jupiter's, is quite small.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>If you're wondering about larger scale motion through the galaxy...jupiter's path is a mirror of the sun's, with the small variations due to it's orbit...which are negligible on that scale. </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p align="center"><font color="#c0c0c0"><br /></font></p><p align="center"><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">--------</font></em></font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">--------</font></em></font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">----</font></em></font><font color="#666699">SaiphMOD@gmail.com </font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">-------------------</font></em></font></p><p><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">"This is my Timey Wimey Detector.  Goes "bing" when there's stuff.  It also fries eggs at 30 paces, wether you want it to or not actually.  I've learned to stay away from hens: It's not pretty when they blow" -- </font></em></font><font size="1" color="#999999">The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>How can i calculate&nbsp;closely do the planets follow the sun? i have data over an extended time period for both the sun and Jupiter however cant find away to compare the paths. can someone please help or point me in the right directioncheers <br />Posted by NDO</DIV><br /><br />Hard to guess what you are looking for here. From the earth, both the sun and Jupiter follow nearly the same path in the sky, called the ecliptic. It's the plane of the solar system from our viewpoint. Jupiter orbits the sun in 12 years, so at one point it will be close to the sun, and 6 years earlier or later it will be opposite the sun, rising at sunset, being highest in the sky at midnight, and setting at sunrise. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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Saiph

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Hard to guess what you are looking for here. From the earth, both the sun and Jupiter follow nearly the same path in the sky, called the ecliptic. It's the plane of the solar system from our viewpoint. Jupiter orbits the sun in 12 years, so at one point it will be close to the sun, and 6 years earlier or later it will be opposite the sun, rising at sunset, being highest in the sky at midnight, and setting at sunrise. <br /> Posted by MeteorWayne</DIV></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>ahhh...that might just be the question!</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Of course you made a boo boo MW!&nbsp; Jupiter's position in the sky, relative to the background constellations does indeed change at the rate you quote.&nbsp; But it's apparent position as viewed from earth, relative to the Sun changes on a nearly yearly basis (not quite...you've still have to factor in Jupiter's motion through the sky too).&nbsp; Afterall, at least once a year (or so) jupiter is on the other side of the sun than the earth :) </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p align="center"><font color="#c0c0c0"><br /></font></p><p align="center"><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">--------</font></em></font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">--------</font></em></font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">----</font></em></font><font color="#666699">SaiphMOD@gmail.com </font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">-------------------</font></em></font></p><p><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">"This is my Timey Wimey Detector.  Goes "bing" when there's stuff.  It also fries eggs at 30 paces, wether you want it to or not actually.  I've learned to stay away from hens: It's not pretty when they blow" -- </font></em></font><font size="1" color="#999999">The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>&nbsp;ahhh...that might just be the question!&nbsp;Of course you made a boo boo MW!&nbsp; Jupiter's position in the sky, relative to the background constellations does indeed change at the rate you quote.&nbsp; But it's apparent position as viewed from earth, relative to the Sun changes on a nearly yearly basis (not quite...you've still have to factor in Jupiter's motion through the sky too).&nbsp; Afterall, at least once a year (or so) jupiter is on the other side of the sun than the earth :) <br />Posted by Saiph</DIV><br /><br />D'oh! Of course you are correct! <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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