Question Dark matter

Oct 21, 2019
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What if dark matter is the physical reminant of matter and antimatter annihilating one another? Has the energy released by this been factored into the dark energy debate? Surely both matter and antimatter shared some component that might not have been destroyed when they collided.
 
Oct 23, 2019
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Physicists have a pretty good grasp on what the annihilation products of matter and antimatter are. So, no, that is probably not the source of dark matter.
 
Q: Does the Big Bang event create dark matter, matter, anti-matter, and the four fundamental forces of nature and where has the physics of this creation model been published? In 1984 (Scientific American report, Guth, A. H. and Steinhardt, P. J., The Inflationary Universe, Scientific American, June 1984), Alan Guth published on exotic particles created during inflation, e.g. magnetic monopoles that would be as abundant or more abundant in our universe today than hydrogen. It seems a big assumption is made in this discussion about the origin of dark matter, matter, anti-matter, fundamental forces, etc., namely the origin of all this stuff has been soundly explained by the Big Bang event.
 
Nov 16, 2019
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What if dark matter is the physical reminant of matter and antimatter annihilating one another? Has the energy released by this been factored into the dark energy debate? Surely both matter and antimatter shared some component that might not have been destroyed when they collided.

It sounds as good of a reason as any, especially considering how little we know about the universe. If my general knowledge is more or less up-to-date the truth is nobody has any solid idea what dark matter is and therefore we can rule out very little. Also, I'm fairly certain we can say we don't fully understand the results of anti-matter and matter annihilation for two reasons 1) Asymmetry 2) We will never have particle accelerators powerful enough to confidently test (and detect) everything the universe can do otherwise.
 
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Nov 18, 2019
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What if dark matter is the physical reminant of matter and antimatter annihilating one another? Has the energy released by this been factored into the dark energy debate? Surely both matter and antimatter shared some component that might not have been destroyed when they collided.
According to the theory, matter and antimatter were created in equal amounts at the big bang. By rights, they should have annihilated each other totally in the first second or so of the universe’s existence. The cosmos should be full of light and little else.
 
Please let me know when dark matter shows up on the Periodic Table of the Elements and has a place on the table. The key idea about dark matter that I understand - without plenty of dark matter in the computer models simulating the origin of the universe after the Big Bang - the universe just expands and nothing forms :)
 
Nov 20, 2019
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What if dark matter is the physical reminant of matter and antimatter annihilating one another? Has the energy released by this been factored into the dark energy debate? Surely both matter and antimatter shared some component that might not have been destroyed when they collided.
The problem with DM could be that people try to explain it using our known physics. My feeling but of course cannot be proven is that the DM is the basic universe and, as such, it would have its own physics or no physics at all ! In the event we will never have words to explain it because it will be inexplicable in our terms. Except to categorise it as 'just dark matter' !
 
Nov 20, 2019
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Please let me know when dark matter shows up on the Periodic Table of the Elements and has a place on the table. The key idea about dark matter that I understand - without plenty of dark matter in the computer models simulating the origin of the universe after the Big Bang - the universe just expands and nothing forms :)
Exactly ! As far as our physics are concerned it is not there at all, and it does not have to be because we are but one universe among eternally billions of universes in which dark matter is the only constant. I have recently published two Science Fiction novels (Dark Matter Transit) which do not attempt to explain DM, except to say that it has no length, no width, depth and no mass. In other words it is immeasurable. There has, however, been a lot of theorising about the DM of late on the basis that there appears to be a unexplained mass near galaxies and this has been put down to DM being influenced by gravity. A simpler solution would probably be that the immense gravity of a galaxy attracts all manner of fine particles which are spread too thinly for optical instruments to discern but in total represent a considerable gravity in their own right. Fancifully, perhaps, I have appended the little ode below to one of the books
Ode To Dark Matter


I see it not, but I am aware,
I know that there is something there.
What is this thing that fills the void
twix you and I and the asteroids ?

It cannot be measured in feet or metre,
Nor even by mile of kilometre.
What is its’ use, I wonder why
It lurks unseen in a clear blue sky ?

Is it the flux that binds-all-together,
from Saturn’s rings to Scottish heather ?
Is this the place where spirits thrive.
The place we go when we are not alive ?

It is the unknown between the stars,
from way out there and Earth and Mars.
It is the path, as we evolve,
that beckons us on and on to solve.

What future then awaits mankind ?
If only we were not so blind.
Are our differences just so great
that world war three we contemplate ?

Sidetrack not-then our ultimate role
for irreligious or political goal.
If we can survive as the human race
Then wonders galore await us in space
 
Voyager I and II are well beyond Pluto now. New Horizons space probe is way out there too but not as far. Did any of the deep space probes show DM as the dominate form of matter in our solar system as they traveled through it? How far from Earth must I go to encounter DM and experience the *force of DM*, e.g. nearby stars? I know there are various arguments for DM in astronomy like spiral galaxy rotation curves but for the present - DM is not confirmed in our solar system or placed upon the Periodic Table of the Elements for chemists to work with.
 
Nov 20, 2019
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I don't think that they have the ability to decide the percentages it is theory and that is subject to change year by year. Last I heard was that DM is inside everything where-ever there is a space i.e. inside atoms and probably even in the parts of atoms and through out space. Down the ages science has given us absolutes as if scientists were God, a few years down the line they change their theories and deride the former ones only to face the same criticism themselves as another generation comes along.It would be better if they preceded each theory with 'we think that......."