Detecting orbit changes from gravity assist flybies

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willpittenger

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Can we detect the changes to a planet's or moon's orbit after a flyby from an artificial spacecraft yet? Obiviously, there would a delta-v change, but could we detect that change with our current technology? I assume the spacecraft making the flyby would be unable to help. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <hr style="margin-top:0.5em;margin-bottom:0.5em" />Will Pittenger<hr style="margin-top:0.5em;margin-bottom:0.5em" />Add this user box to your Wikipedia User Page to show your support for the SDC forums: <div style="margin-left:1em">{{User:Will Pittenger/User Boxes/Space.com Account}}</div> </div>
 
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vogon13

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In the case of Jupiter (per the Voyagers) deflection of Jupiter was less than a micron.<br /><br />Over trillions of years I suppose the effect adds up, Jupiter might arrive at perihelion seconds later than had it not been molested.<br /><br /><br />Relax, there is bigger stuff to worry about.<br /><br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#ff0000"><strong>TPTB went to Dallas and all I got was Plucked !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#339966"><strong>So many people, so few recipes !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#0000ff"><strong>Let's clean up this stinkhole !!</strong></font> </p> </div>
 
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willpittenger

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I wasn't worried. I asked as a way of measuring how sensitive modern telescopes are. I figure we could detect the changes to a small moon (say Europa) more readily than Jupiter (which would include ALL its moons for whatever that would be worth). <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <hr style="margin-top:0.5em;margin-bottom:0.5em" />Will Pittenger<hr style="margin-top:0.5em;margin-bottom:0.5em" />Add this user box to your Wikipedia User Page to show your support for the SDC forums: <div style="margin-left:1em">{{User:Will Pittenger/User Boxes/Space.com Account}}</div> </div>
 
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