Did moon come from earth?

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kyle_baron

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<font color="yellow"><br />If Mercury started at the Earth and swung around the sun, it would return to the spot the Earth was when Mercury was released. In order to allow a circular orbit at its present distance from the Sun, some energy would have to be removed. In other words, you can't just stand on the Earth and throw something at the Sun and have it go into orbit around the Sun at a lesser distance than the Earth. </font><br /><br />My thinking is, that Mercury was a very large asteroid, on a highly elongated orbit. It hit (kissed) the Earth hard, and flattened out it's orbit, somewhat. Mercury still has an elongated orbit today. <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font size="4"><strong></strong></font></p> </div>
 
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kyle_baron

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<font color="yellow"><br />Kyle, that is an interesting hypothesis. I've never even thought about it. </font><br /><br />Well, to be honest, I did have a dream about it. It involved Mercury and our Moon. I just added 1+1 together. <img src="/images/icons/wink.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font size="4"><strong></strong></font></p> </div>
 
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adrenalynn

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It would have had to lose a LOT of mass.<br /><br />Given observation on my current sim, that would have given it a funky "horseshoe" orbit. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p>.</p><p><font size="3">bipartisan</font>  (<span style="color:blue" class="pointer"><span class="pron"><font face="Lucida Sans Unicode" size="2">bī-pär'tĭ-zən, -sən</font></span></span>) [Adj.]  Maintaining the ability to blame republications when your stimulus plan proves to be a devastating failure.</p><p><strong><font color="#ff0000"><font color="#ff0000">IMPE</font><font color="#c0c0c0">ACH</font> <font color="#0000ff"><font color="#c0c0c0">O</font>BAMA</font>!</font></strong></p> </div>
 
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kyle_baron

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<font color="yellow"><br />I highly doubt this. The incoming planet was most likely completely annihilated in the impact. </font><br /><br />An object with an iron core, hitting the mantle of the Earth? When iron hits rock, the rock shatters. <img src="/images/icons/wink.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font size="4"><strong></strong></font></p> </div>
 
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adrenalynn

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Even solid iron impacting tissue paper isn't indestructible, given enough velocity and enough tissue paper. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p>.</p><p><font size="3">bipartisan</font>  (<span style="color:blue" class="pointer"><span class="pron"><font face="Lucida Sans Unicode" size="2">bī-pär'tĭ-zən, -sən</font></span></span>) [Adj.]  Maintaining the ability to blame republications when your stimulus plan proves to be a devastating failure.</p><p><strong><font color="#ff0000"><font color="#ff0000">IMPE</font><font color="#c0c0c0">ACH</font> <font color="#0000ff"><font color="#c0c0c0">O</font>BAMA</font>!</font></strong></p> </div>
 
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kyle_baron

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??????? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font size="4"><strong></strong></font></p> </div>
 
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billslugg

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But Kyle, you are missing my whole point. If Mercury hit the Earth, and somehow came to a complete stop, and fell to the sun, then after one orbit it would be right back where it started from, sitting on the Earth's orbit. There is no way that an interaction of an object with the Earth can put it into an orbit with an aphelion less than the orbit of the Earth.<br /><br />One way your scenario could happen would be for an object to smack into the Earth, come to a near stop, fall to the sun, hit another object and then fall into current Mercury orbit. There must be another body somewhere down there near the sun to settle into a near sun orbit. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p> </p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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Listen folks, you are just making up physics that isn't real. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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kyle_baron

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<font color="yellow"><br />One way your scenario could happen would be for an object to smack into the Earth, come to a near stop, fall to the sun, hit another object and then fall into current Mercury orbit. There must be another body somewhere down there near the sun to settle into a near sun orbit.<br /></font><br /><br />Ok. Apparently you know more about orbital mechanics than I do. I'll agree. 4 billion years ago, there must have been more collisions, and your explanation certainly explains it more accuratly. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font size="4"><strong></strong></font></p> </div>
 
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billslugg

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When I took an orbital mechanics course in 1973 I KNEW that SOMEDAY I would use it. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p> </p> </div>
 
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adrenalynn

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>> There must be another body somewhere down there near the sun to settle into a near sun orbit. <br /><br />I didn't think Relativity allowed for it at this point? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p>.</p><p><font size="3">bipartisan</font>  (<span style="color:blue" class="pointer"><span class="pron"><font face="Lucida Sans Unicode" size="2">bī-pär'tĭ-zən, -sən</font></span></span>) [Adj.]  Maintaining the ability to blame republications when your stimulus plan proves to be a devastating failure.</p><p><strong><font color="#ff0000"><font color="#ff0000">IMPE</font><font color="#c0c0c0">ACH</font> <font color="#0000ff"><font color="#c0c0c0">O</font>BAMA</font>!</font></strong></p> </div>
 
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billslugg

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Relativity didn't allow for what? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p> </p> </div>
 
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willpittenger

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<blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr /><p>direct hit was not one of the viable solutions of the simulation<p><hr /></p></p></blockquote><br />A direct hit might have destroyed both bodies enough that only debris would have been left. No Moon. No Earth. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <hr style="margin-top:0.5em;margin-bottom:0.5em" />Will Pittenger<hr style="margin-top:0.5em;margin-bottom:0.5em" />Add this user box to your Wikipedia User Page to show your support for the SDC forums: <div style="margin-left:1em">{{User:Will Pittenger/User Boxes/Space.com Account}}</div> </div>
 
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willpittenger

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<blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr /><p>When I took an orbital mechanics course in 1973 I KNEW that SOMEDAY I would use it.<p><hr /></p></p></blockquote><br />Was there any thought back then that you might need to wait 34 years to use that knowledge? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <hr style="margin-top:0.5em;margin-bottom:0.5em" />Will Pittenger<hr style="margin-top:0.5em;margin-bottom:0.5em" />Add this user box to your Wikipedia User Page to show your support for the SDC forums: <div style="margin-left:1em">{{User:Will Pittenger/User Boxes/Space.com Account}}</div> </div>
 
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willpittenger

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<blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr /><p>Listen folks, you are just making up physics that isn't real.<p><hr /></p></p></blockquote><br />If you are going to claim that, you need to state what you think isn't real.<br /><br />For me, the part about what is left of the impactor becoming Mercury is unlikely. As I see it, heavier elements, like Iron, would sink down the gravity wells towards the center of planets and the Sun. If you look at the solar system, we have the planets mostly sorted by density. Ditto for the Jovian system (or at least the Galilean moons). <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <hr style="margin-top:0.5em;margin-bottom:0.5em" />Will Pittenger<hr style="margin-top:0.5em;margin-bottom:0.5em" />Add this user box to your Wikipedia User Page to show your support for the SDC forums: <div style="margin-left:1em">{{User:Will Pittenger/User Boxes/Space.com Account}}</div> </div>
 
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alokmohan

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Thread becomig cofusive.Let us know whether moon came from earth and stick to it.
 
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adrenalynn

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That's not the way it works.<br /><br />This is a DISCUSSION. There is no "stick to it" on this topic either here or in the respected academic resources. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p>.</p><p><font size="3">bipartisan</font>  (<span style="color:blue" class="pointer"><span class="pron"><font face="Lucida Sans Unicode" size="2">bī-pär'tĭ-zən, -sən</font></span></span>) [Adj.]  Maintaining the ability to blame republications when your stimulus plan proves to be a devastating failure.</p><p><strong><font color="#ff0000"><font color="#ff0000">IMPE</font><font color="#c0c0c0">ACH</font> <font color="#0000ff"><font color="#c0c0c0">O</font>BAMA</font>!</font></strong></p> </div>
 
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usn_skwerl

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Aye. We're looking at possible ways in which the moon came to be. <br /><br />The moon could have come from earth, or it could have came from debris from something else. I like this discussion, it really opens up to fresh ideas. Basically, it's a refreshing subject. <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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billslugg

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Will<br /><br />It was the early 70's. My time horizon was about a week. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p> </p> </div>
 
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alkalin

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Here is another possible Earth Moon formation theory, one I prefer. In the early formation of a star called our sun there were convulsions much more frequent than now. As time went on there happened to come near a large body that passed by. This convulsed a large amount of matter that became the planets and much other material. The fact that the planets lie in a close plain but not oriented to the suns equator is evidence this is likely to have happened.<br /><br />The region of earth and moon were divided into two bodies, the earth being the larger of the two as this sun material coalesced and started to cool. Much material was present at that time for these two bodies to acquire such as meteors, but the earth being larger gained on the moon in size.<br /><br />We do not see much of meteor impacts here because of the effects of atmosphere and water, but we see the effects on the moon.<br /><br />Geologically there should be a difference in surface content, and the moon has more original matter than earth due to the earth acquiring more space matter which included water.<br /><br />What is wrong with this theory? I think it is superior to an impactor theory.<br /><br />
 
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alokmohan

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You have described both theories well.But I heard once the moon was our nextdoor neighbour.You may include that interesting theory.How nice was to have beloved and moon together those days.
 
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willpittenger

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I was talking about the thread's topic. If you were referring to someone else's post, please reply to that thread.<br /><br />The thread's topic is about the various theories about the origin of the Moon. One theory suggested that Mercury collided with the Earth. I had to point out a problem with that theory. I stayed within the topic of the thread. You did not. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <hr style="margin-top:0.5em;margin-bottom:0.5em" />Will Pittenger<hr style="margin-top:0.5em;margin-bottom:0.5em" />Add this user box to your Wikipedia User Page to show your support for the SDC forums: <div style="margin-left:1em">{{User:Will Pittenger/User Boxes/Space.com Account}}</div> </div>
 
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willpittenger

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Doubtful. That sounds very much like the Co-Accretion theory. That theory died when Apollo found that the Moon is missing Iron and Water. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <hr style="margin-top:0.5em;margin-bottom:0.5em" />Will Pittenger<hr style="margin-top:0.5em;margin-bottom:0.5em" />Add this user box to your Wikipedia User Page to show your support for the SDC forums: <div style="margin-left:1em">{{User:Will Pittenger/User Boxes/Space.com Account}}</div> </div>
 
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billslugg

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Hey Will:<br />Considering that Apollo came back with no evidence of iron or water, do you suppose there were a bunch of people standing around saying: "Hello!! Look at the Moon - it is NOT red! We been telling you this for ages!!"<br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p> </p> </div>
 
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