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Do Magnets Work in Space?

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rebekah

Guest
I just want to know if a magnet would still have the same properties (attraction/repulsive, etc...) in space that they do on earth.
 
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CalliArcale

Guest
Yes; electromagnetism works exactly the same in space. In fact, there are some very big magnets in space. The Earth is one of them! The biggest magnet in the entire solar system, however, is the Sun. It's magnetic field is enormous, with its influence encompassing all of the planets. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><font color="#666699"><em>"People assume that time is a strict progression of cause to effect, but actually from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint it's more like a big ball of wibbly wobbly . . . timey wimey . . . stuff."</em>  -- The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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rebekah

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Thanks =)....i thought so....i heard someone on the radio say that they did not, but it just seemed wrong... =)
 
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Saiph

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No, the mistake on the radio show is they figured there are no refridgerators in space, so magnets must not work.<br /><br /><img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p align="center"><font color="#c0c0c0"><br /></font></p><p align="center"><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">--------</font></em></font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">--------</font></em></font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">----</font></em></font><font color="#666699">SaiphMOD@gmail.com </font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">-------------------</font></em></font></p><p><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">"This is my Timey Wimey Detector.  Goes "bing" when there's stuff.  It also fries eggs at 30 paces, wether you want it to or not actually.  I've learned to stay away from hens: It's not pretty when they blow" -- </font></em></font><font size="1" color="#999999">The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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heyscottie

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Rebekah:<br /><br />Excellent example of critical thinking! The world needs more people like you -- those that can sift through the things they hear, weigh it on its merits, and do further research if something seems to be not correct. Kudos!<br /><br />Scott
 
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valareos

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brings up an interesting question...<br /><br />The magnetic force between two opposites is stronger than the gravitational force between the two. (put two magnets in space, they not attracted that fast together due to gravity I assure you :p)<br /><br />So then question becomes, can you have an object orbiting another NOT because of gravity, but because of electromagnetic attraction?<br /><br />
 
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Saiph

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And if you can? Why don't we see it anywhere (hint: we don't see it)? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p align="center"><font color="#c0c0c0"><br /></font></p><p align="center"><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">--------</font></em></font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">--------</font></em></font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">----</font></em></font><font color="#666699">SaiphMOD@gmail.com </font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">-------------------</font></em></font></p><p><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">"This is my Timey Wimey Detector.  Goes "bing" when there's stuff.  It also fries eggs at 30 paces, wether you want it to or not actually.  I've learned to stay away from hens: It's not pretty when they blow" -- </font></em></font><font size="1" color="#999999">The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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lunatio_gordin

Guest
This sort of leads me to a new question. Since, in skylab in particular, they had problems being stranded in the middle of the enclosed Volume (for lack of a better term... room just doesn't fit.) Could you use an electromagnet to draw yourself or repel yourself from the walls?
 
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Leovinus

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You mean like an electron orbiting an atom's nucleus? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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Saiph

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You could. But the electronics wouldn't like a magnet that strong wandering about. And it's a royal pain to shield against magnetism (electricity is easy though). <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p align="center"><font color="#c0c0c0"><br /></font></p><p align="center"><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">--------</font></em></font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">--------</font></em></font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">----</font></em></font><font color="#666699">SaiphMOD@gmail.com </font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">-------------------</font></em></font></p><p><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">"This is my Timey Wimey Detector.  Goes "bing" when there's stuff.  It also fries eggs at 30 paces, wether you want it to or not actually.  I've learned to stay away from hens: It's not pretty when they blow" -- </font></em></font><font size="1" color="#999999">The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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lunatio_gordin

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ha... I kinda forgot about all the computers and such. But for, say, a Zero G "playroom", on a commercial station, that might be a feasible proposal?
 
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Saiph

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yep. Quite feasible. Just lace (or build) the walls of the room with feromagnetic materials (the stuff that normally sticks to magnets) and you'll be fine. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p align="center"><font color="#c0c0c0"><br /></font></p><p align="center"><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">--------</font></em></font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">--------</font></em></font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">----</font></em></font><font color="#666699">SaiphMOD@gmail.com </font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">-------------------</font></em></font></p><p><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">"This is my Timey Wimey Detector.  Goes "bing" when there's stuff.  It also fries eggs at 30 paces, wether you want it to or not actually.  I've learned to stay away from hens: It's not pretty when they blow" -- </font></em></font><font size="1" color="#999999">The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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nacnud

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Better yet have some circulation in the air that would blow you to the edge after a while.
 
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lunatio_gordin

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But your time in there would be pretty precious, so waiting to get blown to the far side might not be optimal...
 
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igorsboss

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Just carry a permanent magnet with a string on it.<br /><br />When you're done floating about, just gently fling the magnet at the wall until it sticks someplace, then pull yourself to the wall using the string.
 
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lunatio_gordin

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Well, the act of throwing the magnet would push you back, so it'd have to be a long string!<br />I was thinking elctromagnet, cause you'd want to turn it off. If you had a big high power magnet, You'd go flying towards the walls at a pretty high speed. Wouldn't be fun. Well, it <i> would </i> be fun, until you actually hit the wall.
 
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igorsboss

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<font color="yellow">the act of throwing the magnet would push you back</font><br /><br />Yes, but... A 300 gram magnet thrown at 1/10 meter per second won't yield enough thrust to move you. You'll only need enough string to reach to the wall.<br /><br />Once the magnet sticks, you might get about 10 pounds worth of sticking force. Gently pulling the string would easily be enough to move your body to a handhold. Once you get the handhold, take the magnet off the wall, roll up the string, and stick it to your utility belt.
 
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lunatio_gordin

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Well, that definitely sounds like the best idea so far.
 
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nexium

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I presume the Earth is attracted to the Sun by the opposite magnetic polarity more often than they are repelled. The mass of the sun may be slightly less than the calculated value, if we did not figure the average magnetic attraction. My guess is the magnetic attraction is much less than the gravity attraction, for very massive bodies such as Earth and sun, but may be quite important for small iron meterorites, which pass close to Earth. Neil
 
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siarad

Guest
Seems magnetic attraction is very strong close-up but has little range whereas gravity is weak close-up but has a long range
 
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CalliArcale

Guest
Actually, gravity is strongest close-up. Gravity and magnetism both follow the inverse square rule -- the strength of the field decreases proportional to the inverse square of the distance. However, for most bodies, gravity is a heck of a lot more powerful than magnetism. The Earth's magnetic field is no small potatoes, but it's so massive that its gravity is far more significant.<br /><br />There ARE objects where the magnetic field may be more significant in terms of attraction because it's so phenomenally intense. Look up "magnetar". <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><font color="#666699"><em>"People assume that time is a strict progression of cause to effect, but actually from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint it's more like a big ball of wibbly wobbly . . . timey wimey . . . stuff."</em>  -- The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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vogon13

Guest
Two magnets interacting in zero gee would be interesting. If individually rotating, alternating alignments of attractive and repulsive combininations of poles would make for interesting trajectories.<br /><br />Additionally, if magnets were not 100% pure (magnetically speaking) (hope I'm wording this right) losses due to eddy currents would make system 'lossy', and magnets would most likely stick together pretty quickly.<br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#ff0000"><strong>TPTB went to Dallas and all I got was Plucked !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#339966"><strong>So many people, so few recipes !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#0000ff"><strong>Let's clean up this stinkhole !!</strong></font> </p> </div>
 
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siarad

Guest
Yes I know but try this:<br />Put a piece of iron on the surface of the Earth & likewise touch a mgnet to it.<br />Now lift the magnet.<br />Aha the iron comes too so magnetism close up is stronger.<br />Now lift the iron a foot up & hold the magnet only six inches above the iron & let the iron go.<br />See what I mean <img src="/images/icons/laugh.gif" />
 
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