Filters and Eyepieces

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toothferry

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Does anyone know of a website or other resource that lists nebula and whether one filter or another is superior for certain observations.. for instance whether a Broadband, Narrowband, Oxygen-3, Hydrogen-Beta or other spectral line filter would achieve the greatest contrast on a specific nebula? I don't have any of these filters, but I was thinking about getting a Narrowband and hoping that would be a great one for starters. Which type is your favorite? <br /><br />Also, I don't have any 2" eyepieces. (My longest focal length is a 32mm plossl) Any opinions regarding investing in 2" eyepieces? <br /><br />thanks <img src="/images/icons/cool.gif" />
 
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toothferry

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ok, I know the best way to find out which filters are "best" is to join a star party and look through each for every nebula ...but I found a rating online.. comparing LPR, UHC, Oxygen-III and Hydrogen-Beta filters [the first is known as the Skyglow-broadband and the second as the Ultrablock-narrowband by Orion Telescopes] used on over 50 nebula. Its a great reference source!!<br /><br />http://www.spacegazer.com/deep-sky-filters-g.asp
 
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toothferry

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update... I've got my Ultrablock filter and finally used it observing M27 "Dumbell" planetary nebula, which happens to be directly overhead in the early evening ..in Sept./Oct. It took an hour to find it! I had to take off the 50mm finder scope and pop on the "EZ-finder".. fotunately before I gave up ..BINGO!<br /><br />It worked as discribed... the background sky and stars were darkened and the nebula stood out much more dramatically. It really stood out! I observed it with a Orion Skyquest 10" with a 32mm, 25mm and 10mm (plossl eyepieces) with and without the filter. The nebula was a bit too small using the 32mm and even the 25mm.. but took up too much of the field of view with the 10mm and seemed to start fading away at that point. I figure a 17mm plossl would have been just about perfect.<br /><br />I think I need to pick up that, a good star chart, and the Baader Moon and Skyglow filter that CrazyEddie has recommended and I'll be set for the remainder of the fall. ..hmmm, just wondering how the Expanse series of eyepieces would work with Nebula using an XT10?
 
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nashville

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A friend of mine has loaned me his Meade 10" LX50, one of the eyepieces is a 2" 20mm Nagler..WOW!
 
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toothferry

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Ive only heard about the Naglers.. extra extra wide field.. WOW view plus a WOW price <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" />
 
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toothferry

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update- Tonight I tested everything out on M57, the Ring Nebula. Much smaller and a bit dimmer than M27, the Dumbell Nebula, its still easier to find taking me only a few minutes after aiming the telescope. I knew exactly where to look. Sometimes pictures of this nebula get passed around through email with other "amazing images", only known as "the eye of God" to non astronomers.<br /><br />My best eyepiece for this one was the 6mm Expanse. The Ultrablock filter darkened the background to the point that it was just about the only thing visible... The dark center was easy to spot, and it does kind of look like an eye especially using the peripheral vision trick. <br /><br />It was nice swapping between the 32mm plossl and seeing all the background stars with that one "fuzzy" [m57] in the center. And then swapping that out with the Expanse 6mm plus the narrowband filter screwed into it, zoomed in up close and personal. (200x). <br /><br />On the other hand, it is nice to have a few background stars to get a perspective of the entire field of few with the Expanse eyepiece alone, and so I would also take the filter on and off admiring the difference... but the lack of contrast without the narrowband does make this one seem much dimmer.. or rather washed out with the rest of the background... just as was the case with M27.<br />
 
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