GOT MY SCOPEEEEEEEEE :)

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TahaSiddiqui

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<p>Alright, so I just bought my Orion XT8 today and am pretty excited :)! For $279 Canadian, I got the whole telescope including many accessories such as a 25mm and 10mm possl, laser collimator, collimation cap, and&nbsp;some planisphere thing. These were all things that the previous buyer bought and returned after using the scope only once!&nbsp;However, when I traded in my scope, he gave me a $130 cash in thing because he could buy a new one for $155. So for the cash in, I got a Orion&nbsp;32mm possl (he doesnt sell televue), a Nightwatchers book thing, and a LED flashlight. I think this is good because now I have a 32mm, 25mm, 17.5mm, 10mm and a barlow lense. The 10mm has a pretty small eye relief so idk how it'll be. Anyway, I have a question regarding focusing. On my older scopes (Tasco 60mm and 114mm) I could focus on objects that were pretty nearby. Now for my OrionXT8 I can't focus on anything I could have on my older scopes. Is this usual? In the manual for the Orion it says to try focusing on something that is around 1/4 mile far. So what that be the problem why I can't perfectly focus my objects?</p><p>Thanks !!!</p>
 
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kyle_baron

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Alright, so I just bought my Orion XT8 today and am pretty excited :)! For $279 Canadian, I got the whole telescope including many accessories such as a 25mm and 10mm possl, laser collimator, collimation cap, and&nbsp;some planisphere thing. These were all things that the previous buyer bought and returned after using the scope only once!&nbsp;However, when I traded in my scope, he gave me a $130 cash in thing because he could buy a new one for $155. So for the cash in, I got a Orion&nbsp;32mm possl (he doesnt sell televue), a Nightwatchers book thing, and a LED flashlight. I think this is good because now I have a 32mm, 25mm, 17.5mm, 10mm and a barlow lense. The 10mm has a pretty small eye relief so idk how it'll be. Anyway, I have a question regarding focusing. On my older scopes (Tasco 60mm and 114mm) I could focus on objects that were pretty nearby. Now for my OrionXT8 I can't focus on anything I could have on my older scopes. Is this usual? In the manual for the Orion it says to try focusing on something that is around 1/4 mile far. So what that be the problem why I can't perfectly focus my objects?Thanks !!! <br />Posted by TahaSiddiqui</DIV></p><p><strong>Excellent choice, I have the same one!&nbsp; I use it mainly on the moon, planets, and double stars.&nbsp; You can put in your lowest power eyepiece and adjust your finderscope on terrestrial objects, from 1/4 to 1/2 mile away.</strong><br /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font size="4"><strong></strong></font></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Alright, so I just bought my Orion XT8 today and am pretty excited :)! For $279 Canadian, I got the whole telescope including many accessories such as a 25mm and 10mm possl, laser collimator, collimation cap, and&nbsp;some planisphere thing. These were all things that the previous buyer bought and returned after using the scope only once!&nbsp;However, when I traded in my scope, he gave me a $130 cash in thing because he could buy a new one for $155. So for the cash in, I got a Orion&nbsp;32mm possl (he doesnt sell televue), a Nightwatchers book thing, and a LED flashlight. I think this is good because now I have a 32mm, 25mm, 17.5mm, 10mm and a barlow lense. The 10mm has a pretty small eye relief so idk how it'll be. Anyway, I have a question regarding focusing. On my older scopes (Tasco 60mm and 114mm) I could focus on objects that were pretty nearby. Now for my OrionXT8 I can't focus on anything I could have on my older scopes. Is this usual? In the manual for the Orion it says to try focusing on something that is around 1/4 mile far. So what that be the problem why I can't perfectly focus my objects?Thanks !!! <br />Posted by TahaSiddiqui</DIV><br /><br />You probably need to collimate it. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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crazyeddie

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'> Anyway, I have a question regarding focusing. On my older scopes (Tasco 60mm and 114mm) I could focus on objects that were pretty nearby. Now for my OrionXT8 I can't focus on anything I could have on my older scopes. Is this usual? In the manual for the Orion it says to try focusing on something that is around 1/4 mile far. So what that be the problem why I can't perfectly focus my objects?Thanks !!! <br /> Posted by TahaSiddiqui</DIV></p><p>Can you focus on very distant objects? &nbsp;If so, then there is nothing wrong. &nbsp;Newtonian reflectors have a much smaller focusing range than refractors or catadioptric scopes. &nbsp;They are not meant to focus on nearby objects. &nbsp;That's just one of the tradeoffs you have to accept. &nbsp;If you want to use your telescope as a spotting scope or birding scope as well, other kinds of scopes are more suitable.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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TahaSiddiqui

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Excellent choice, I have the same one!&nbsp; I use it mainly on the moon, planets, and double stars.&nbsp; You can put in your lowest power eyepiece and adjust your finderscope on terrestrial objects, from 1/4 to 1/2 mile away. <br />Posted by kyle_baron</DIV><br /><br />Yeah you were completely right, I easily focused on Jupiter the night I got it. It was so much brighter than my 4.5"! My scope does need a little collimating but it's nothing too bad so i'll leave it until it becomes noticeable in the eyepiece. I love this scope, its my baby :). You mainly use it on the moon planets and double stars? What do you use for DSO's? On the night I got it, I had great views of Jupiter, M57, and M31 through my light polluted backyard. I have one question though. Ive been reading on that objects like planetary nebulas and globular clusters really benefit from high magnification and I did notice that completely when I was changin the view from 38X - 120X for M57. However, I found M15 (globular in pegasus) and I did notice it was better at 120X compared to 38X (bit of stars resolved around the edges). I have a barlow lense, but I can't find it with 240X. So my question is, should I buy an eyepiece that will provide 200X-240X without a barlow and will that make the view much better? </p><p>Thanks</p>
 
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crazyeddie

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Yeah you were completely right, I easily focused on Jupiter the night I got it. It was so much brighter than my 4.5"! My scope does need a little collimating but it's nothing too bad so i'll leave it until it becomes noticeable in the eyepiece. I love this scope, its my baby :). You mainly use it on the moon planets and double stars? What do you use for DSO's? On the night I got it, I had great views of Jupiter, M57, and M31 through my light polluted backyard. I have one question though. Ive been reading on that objects like planetary nebulas and globular clusters really benefit from high magnification and I did notice that completely when I was changin the view from 38X - 120X for M57. However, I found M15 (globular in pegasus) and I did notice it was better at 120X compared to 38X (bit of stars resolved around the edges). I have a barlow lense, but I can't find it with 240X. So my question is, should I buy an eyepiece that will provide 200X-240X without a barlow and will that make the view much better? Thanks <br /> Posted by TahaSiddiqui</DIV></p><p>The answer depends on how good your barlow lens is. &nbsp;If it's a cheap one, you're probably better off buying a new eyepiece that provides the magnification you want. &nbsp;But the main advantage of a barlow is that it preserves the eye relief the the eyepiece you use it with, so if you need eye relief because you need to use your glasses when you observe, then you have two choices: use a lower-power eyepiece with good eye relief in combination with a barlow lens, or else buy an eyepiece with good eye relief built-in, such as a Televue Radian or an Orion Epic. &nbsp;Personally, I don't care much for barlows. &nbsp;I have a decent one by Televue, but I never use it any longer.</p><p>Why can't you find the globular cluster at 240x? &nbsp;Did you lose it when you switched eyepieces? &nbsp;That's frustrating when it happens!&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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astro_anthro

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>The answer depends on how good your barlow lens is. &nbsp;If it's a cheap one, you're probably better off buying a new eyepiece that provides the magnification you want. &nbsp;But the main advantage of a barlow is that it preserves the eye relief the the eyepiece you use it with, so if you need eye relief because you need to use your glasses when you observe, then you have two choices: use a lower-power eyepiece with good eye relief in combination with a barlow lens, or else buy an eyepiece with good eye relief built-in, such as a Televue Radian or an Orion Epic. &nbsp;Personally, I don't care much for barlows. &nbsp;I have a decent one by Televue, but I never use it any longer.Why can't you find the globular cluster at 240x? &nbsp;Did you lose it when you switched eyepieces? &nbsp;That's frustrating when it happens!&nbsp; <br /> Posted by crazyeddie</DIV></p><p>Its easy to loose your target as you push past 200x Taha. Thats why I like to use a RDF together with a conventional finder. It also helps to take into account target drift when changing your eyepieces. Position the target at the edge of the field such that it drifts to the center by the time you have the new eyepiece in. </p><p>As I'm sure you know Crazyeddie, many of the newer high power, long eye-relief eyepieces have a lens element or group that functions much like a barlow, but as these are better integrated with the other lens groups, they generally yield better views than eyepieces used with barlows. BTW, in a previous thread I mentioned that the TMB Planetary eyepieces were out of production, but just this week some retailers got new ones in stock. They are being sold as TMB rather than TMB/Burgess, but they are optically identical from what I can gather. Very reasonable at $60--I just received one of the 6mm ones today, can't wait to try it out. Which means rain tonight I'm sure! Clear skies! Tom</p>
 
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TahaSiddiqui

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>The answer depends on how good your barlow lens is. &nbsp;If it's a cheap one, you're probably better off buying a new eyepiece that provides the magnification you want. &nbsp;But the main advantage of a barlow is that it preserves the eye relief the the eyepiece you use it with, so if you need eye relief because you need to use your glasses when you observe, then you have two choices: use a lower-power eyepiece with good eye relief in combination with a barlow lens, or else buy an eyepiece with good eye relief built-in, such as a Televue Radian or an Orion Epic. &nbsp;Personally, I don't care much for barlows. &nbsp;I have a decent one by Televue, but I never use it any longer.Why can't you find the globular cluster at 240x? &nbsp;Did you lose it when you switched eyepieces? &nbsp;That's frustrating when it happens!&nbsp; <br />Posted by crazyeddie</DIV><br /><br />Yeah I just kept on loosing it when I switched from a 32mm to a 10mm with a barlow (5mm) :p. But last night I actually got 240X on the globular. It looked better, a bit dimmer though. I bet if I was in a very dark site and saw it, I would've had alot better contrast to make out more detail. My backyard would be classified as a white/red zone on the light pollution scale. I think my barlow is poor quality as well. So in the future I think i'll just buy a good 6mm eyepiece like the Televue, Orions or the TMB ones astro anthro mentioned. Will M13 or M92 look better than what M15? M13 is the best glob in the N hemisphere but would it be a big difference between M15 and M13?<br />Thanks!!
 
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crazyeddie

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Yeah I just kept on loosing it when I switched from a 32mm to a 10mm with a barlow (5mm) :p. But last night I actually got 240X on the globular. It looked better, a bit dimmer though. I bet if I was in a very dark site and saw it, I would've had alot better contrast to make out more detail. My backyard would be classified as a white/red zone on the light pollution scale. I think my barlow is poor quality as well. So in the future I think i'll just buy a good 6mm eyepiece like the Televue, Orions or the TMB ones astro anthro mentioned. Will M13 or M92 look better than what M15? M13 is the best glob in the N hemisphere but would it be a big difference between M15 and M13?Thanks!! <br /> Posted by TahaSiddiqui</DIV></p><p>I'm primarily a lunar/planetary observer, so perhaps someone else can answer your questions on the relative merits of the deep-sky objects you mentioned.&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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