Gravity, Mass and Dark Matter

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joe1ufo

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<p>Since the known universe is missing a lot of mass physicists have opted for dark matter and dark energy to account </p><p>for the loss. I have an idea and question. If all the gravity in every planet, star, asteroid, etc., is converted to mass</p><p>with the help of Einsteins famous equation, Energy equals Mass times the speed of light squared. Divide both side</p><p>by C squared and you have on the left Energy or the Force of Gravity divided by the speed of light squared and on</p><p>the right hand side you have Mass or more importantly, the mass of gravity.&nbsp; My question is this, could this be</p><p>the missing mass in our universe? Any thoughts on this possibility? I appreciate any replies to my theory.</p>
 
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MeteorWayne

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Since the known universe is missing a lot of mass physicists have opted for dark matter and dark energy to account for the loss. I have an idea and question. If all the gravity in every planet, star, asteroid, etc., is converted to masswith the help of Einsteins famous equation, Energy equals Mass times the speed of light squared. Divide both sideby C squared and you have on the left Energy or the Force of Gravity divided by the speed of light squared and onthe right hand side you have Mass or more importantly, the mass of gravity.&nbsp; My question is this, could this bethe missing mass in our universe? Any thoughts on this possibility? I appreciate any replies to my theory. <br />Posted by joe1ufo</DIV><br /><br />No, not at all. You need to understand the reasons for the suggestions of dark mass and dark energy. There is lots of data supporting these ideas. They may not be exactly the right ones. After all, dark mass and dark energy are placeholders for a disagreeemnt with the fine details of the standard model of the Universe. </p><p>You need to&nbsp; undestand a bit more about the foundations.</p><p>Welcome to Space.com!</p><p>Do some research, and keep asking questions once you do!</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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DrRocket

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Since the known universe is missing a lot of mass physicists have opted for dark matter and dark energy to account for the loss. I have an idea and question. If all the gravity in every planet, star, asteroid, etc., is converted to masswith the help of Einsteins famous equation, Energy equals Mass times the speed of light squared. Divide both sideby C squared and you have on the left Energy or the Force of Gravity divided by the speed of light squared and onthe right hand side you have Mass or more importantly, the mass of gravity.&nbsp; My question is this, could this bethe missing mass in our universe? Any thoughts on this possibility? I appreciate any replies to my theory. <br />Posted by joe1ufo</DIV></p><p>The effect of gravity on the energy content of the universe has been considered.&nbsp; But it turns out that gravity provides negative energy.&nbsp; For a discussion you might take a look at Alan Guth's book <em>The Inflationary Universe.&nbsp; </em>At one time there was actually a suggestion that when you include gravity the net energy in the universe might be 0 -- a rather elegant idea if true.</p><p>Dark energy is a hypothesis designed to explain accelerating expansion of the universe and provides a repulsive effect, where gravity provides an attractive effect.&nbsp; It is still only a hypothesis, but one that is gaining favor and observational support.</p><p>Dark matter is a hypothesis that is intended to explain the ability of gravity to hold spiral galaxies together and to permit the observed rotation rates.&nbsp; It to is still only a hypothesis and is also gaining favor and observational support.</p><p>I don't think there is much hope that gravity could explain the missing mass, for two reasons.&nbsp; First, the effect of gravity has been considered by some very good theorists.&nbsp; It is not a new idea.&nbsp; Second because the missing mass has some rather restrictive requirements on its distribution between and within galaxies that would not be consistent with&nbsp;it arising from gravitational energy.</p><p>But you are thinking and that is good.</p><p>You may have some other thoughts later.&nbsp; You ought to know that the missing mass is also probably not electromagnetic radiation or neutrinos.&nbsp; Professional physicists have put a lot of thought into this problem and it is not likely that they have overlooked something simple that will be noticed by an amateur.&nbsp; But you never know.&nbsp;<br /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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