How does the Russian docking system find its port?

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bobw

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<font color="yellow"> The progress (or new module) would need to see the drogue somehow to ensure it doesn't need to roll first.</font><br /><br />That sounds like a great wikipedia entry. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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jimfromnsf

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"Jim, if you know the answer why don't you just provide it?"<br /><br />Because I would have to do an internet search to provide the correct answer. There are many references on the web wrt KURS, rendezvous and docking
 
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holmec

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Will, <br /><br />I think your answer may be more than one explination. As a ship approaches the ISS by ground control, they set it up in front of the right dock a distance away. There are mirrors and targets on the dock itself to help guide the ship in as it approaches. If you look at ESA's site and read about ATV's docking sims you might get a better understanding. Since the ATV will use the same dock port as Progress, docking should be similar in operation.<br /><br />Check out this ESA link, it has a video on the docking trials:ATV docking trials<br /><br /> It looks like the ATV will use GPS technology to set itself up for the docking....Then the auto docking systems take over.<br /><br />We know that Russia has a similar system to GPS now whether the ground is controlling Progress or its being guided by the Russian "GPS", I don't know. Either way that process is what is setting up the Progress for rendezvous and docking. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><font color="#0000ff"><em>"SCE to AUX" - John Aaron, curiosity pays off</em></font></p> </div>
 
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CalliArcale

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<blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr /><p>Aggh. You still misunderstand. How do they aim it at the port? If the system is automatic once the controllers pick the port, then what?<p><hr /></p></p></blockquote><br /><br />Basically, there's a radio transponder at the port. The KURS system homes in on it courtesy of a set of receiving antennas on the Progress that allow it to tell if it is drifting relative to the station. It also allows the KURS system to compute range and relative speed.<br /><br />The system is effective, but occasionally goes a little flaky. There have certainly been situations where the Progress just couldn't keep a lock on the port. In these cases, a cosmonaut on the station or the ground can take over remotely. They prefer having the autonomous system do it if at all possible, though. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><font color="#666699"><em>"People assume that time is a strict progression of cause to effect, but actually from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint it's more like a big ball of wibbly wobbly . . . timey wimey . . . stuff."</em>  -- The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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holmec

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The ATV uses passive reflectors on the Russian port. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><font color="#0000ff"><em>"SCE to AUX" - John Aaron, curiosity pays off</em></font></p> </div>
 
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bobw

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Great link Cbased . Interesting information about the handshaking, switching antenna systems, and final guidance on the inertial platform.<br /><br />It must have taken a while to find that one <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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