In light of exoplanatory detection - possible methodology

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nettsight

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I've had this thought for a while and wondering if the technique I'm proposing would be possible to capture images of explanatory existence. From my knowledge I know that there's a threshold regarding a standard stars ability to generate extreme gamma rays (like our sun).

It's known the energy associated with extreme gamma rays is such that they tend to 'bend' the least in space-time via gravity lensing around mass and would develop the sharpest resolution of remote objects in deep space.

My idea is to view such gamma ray background light that propagates from only the most extreme source in deep space, that is from neutron stars - quasars and excretion discs around blackholes, light that is not possible to generate from the more common 'domestic stars' given that their gravity is not strong enough to create nuclear products to radiate such rays in the first place.

This could easily be achieved with thick steal or lead filters in observational equipment that would not only block the delta ray activity of the upper atmosphere but also the sun and other less powerful stars in the galaxy itself.

What I'm theorizing is that with long term exposure (either with digital equipment or chemical/analog) it might be possible to see the galaxy in 'white space' (gamma saturated light) with darker images/zones in images reveling the presence of planets and their parent stars alike as the stars themselves would have their near extreme gamma radiation filtered too.

The technique I'm suggesting is allowing the extreme background gamma to reveal images and at the same time blocking the overpowering light of standard stars shining on non luminous objects ie; exoplanets - all with the one technique.

I've figured that this light would be pretty patchy given the incidence source(s) though with zoning in on these areas in observed images an algorithm could be developed to smooth out this by emulating the exposure time on the least brightest zones to match up with the most(or vice versa). I also feel that this technique (or a derivative of it) could be combined with the standard gravitational lensing techniques currently employed to detect exoplanets.

To summarize: is this or could this be a valid methodology to detect exoplanets and if it is -(or isn't) what laws of physics would prevent this technique from accomplishing such?

PS: I conducted some thought experiments with this and visualized that ring like disks could appear in images around large black spots representing the stars that blocked the source of the extreme gamma emissions. The rings would be the orbits of exoplanets from long term exposure, and the diameter will indicate the orbital times and distances of these objects.

☄ ☼ ☆
 
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origin

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Re: In light of explanatory direction - possible methodology

I've got a concern on your post right from the 'get go'.

You said:
It's known the energy associated with extreme gamma rays is such that they tend to 'bend' the least in space-time via gravity lensing around mass and would develop the sharpest resolution of remote objects in deep space.
I could very well be wrong but this is news to me. I was under the belief that regardless of the frequency of the photon the path through a gravitational field would be the same.

Perhaps you could post a link supporting/explaining this aspect of your post?
 
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kg

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This sounds similar somewhat to serching for exoplanets using a infrared telescope. The idea being there will be less glare from the star in that wavelength so you might have more chance of seeing a planet. This method works best when the "planet" is really large and warm, such as a brown dwarf. I don't think this would work with gamma-rays because planets don't really emit gamma-rays and wouldn't stand out.

There is a orbiting gamma-ray telescope up and running already and I don't see exoplanatory detection listed as part of it's mission. Here is a link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gamma-ray_ ... _Telescope
 
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Saiph

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sorry, not gunna work. Creative idea though.

Stars are point sources, so you won't get a wash of gamma ray light blocking things. Look at the night sky, each of those stars is producing vast amounts of light, most of it visible....and yet we still see discrete sources. The only way you'd get a 'dark spot' in a gamma ray image is if your gamma source moved directly behind an intervening star. And even then you won't get much useful information out of it as the amount blocked by a planet is so small I don't think you could pick it out from the noise in the signal..
 
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SpaceTas

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"It's known the energy associated with extreme gamma rays is such that they tend to 'bend' the least in space-time via gravity lensing around mass and would develop the sharpest resolution of remote objects in deep space."

Sorry nettsight I'll have to shoot down your idea from the get go.

Gamma-rays are a form of electromagnetic radiation the same as light but at shorter wavelengths (higher energy). They or their energy do not bend space-time. Often the objects that are gamma-ray sources are also very massive compact objects like neutron stars and black holes. These objects have strong enough gravity to substantially but locally bend space-time.

Other points:
gamma-ray sources are rare on the sky; so they don't make good background sources.
gamma-rays are stopped by the atmosphere; so all this lead etc has to be in space.

delta-rays Huh ???? Never heard of them
Lead etc stops gamma-rays fairly well.

As a starting point about gamma-ray astronomy see: http://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/introduction/gamma_information.html
Also have a look at my post on current/proposed planet detection methods: Ask The Astronomer > Methods used to find exoplanets
 
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