Introversion

Nov 3, 2020
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I don't understand exactly what you mean by asking this question. But a star can become a black hole, if that's what you mean. This happens with huge celestial bodies, inside which powerful thermonuclear processes take place, under which the processes of contraction and expansion of the star take place. At some point, a thermonuclear explosion occurs, in the place of which a black hole remains.
 
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Nov 17, 2020
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I don't understand exactly what you mean by asking this question. But a star can become a black hole, if that's what you mean. This happens with huge celestial bodies, inside which powerful thermonuclear processes take place, under which the processes of contraction and expansion of the star take place. At some point, a thermonuclear explosion occurs, in the place of which a black hole remains.
I was wondering if a star can evolve and change into a inside out star. It was just a thought and was hoping someone would say yes and tell me why.
 
Feb 23, 2020
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yes it implodes

at the end of life of the star, the reaction that has fueled the star for it's lifetime fails
-then a reaction takes place that causes it's dimension to fall, and then the lesser dimension has more density.

The simple answer for why is that it's energy has depleted comparitive to it's stable period
 
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Feb 23, 2020
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I don't really know what happens that well
-but perhaps neutron or black hole are implosions
& super-nova is an explosion
all of these seem to be artifacts of a non-stable star at the end of it's function as a star

these events are due to (why) the star not being able to sustain it's combustion/nuclear action
-it has run out of fuel
 
Jun 1, 2020
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...these events are due to (why) the star not being able to sustain it's combustion/nuclear action
-it has run out of fuel
That's correct. To be a "star" in a formal sense, requires that the core is fusing elements. The universe was formed with 9 parts H and 1 part He, and very little else. As a nebula collapses to form a star, sometimes a million from one nebula, a protostar forms. It, at this point, is already hot from all that crashing down of the gas and dust -- look what one large meteor can do to our surface.

So the core of the protostar gets hotter and hotter and glows brighter and brighter. When the temperature in the core gets into the millions of degrees, fusion begins. Deuterium (H2) will be first, IIRC, but this doesn't last long since there is so very little of it. Once temperatures are high enough, hydrogen (H) begins fusing into helium (He) and the protostar will very quickly become qualified as a "star".

As hydrogen depletes, the star contracts and the core temperature increases. Eventually, helium will begin to dominate the fusion process. As it depletes, the star, of course increases in core temperature, but only the most massive stars are capable of getting hot enough to move up the elemental chain.

Explosions (Type II supernovae) come when the elemental chain reaches iron and that's a huge problem for the star. This absorbs energy instead of supplying it. So, in almost an instant, the core collapses causing catastrophic events that lead to the outer regions of the star to explode as the core, as you mentioned, implodes.

Stars like our Sun aren't close to being massive enough for this to happen, but during as hydrogen depletes and helium fusion is active in the core, its outer layers will be blown away (think non-violently but at high speeds). The result for our Sun will be that it will run out of fuel (He) and the core will contract into a ball about the size of the Earth, thus becoming a very hot white dwarf (that will look bluish white). Notice that you don't hear it called a white dwarf "star", since WDs are not officially stars, though they certainly glow.
 
Nov 17, 2020
71
21
35
I don't really know what happens that well
-but perhaps neutron or black hole are implosions
& super-nova is an explosion
all of these seem to be artifacts of a non-stable star at the end of it's function as a star

these events are due to (why) the star not being able to sustain it's combustion/nuclear action
-it has run out of fuel
Hi. What are the characteristics of a non-stable star please? Thank you.
 
Nov 17, 2020
71
21
35
That's correct. To be a "star" in a formal sense, requires that the core is fusing elements. The universe was formed with 9 parts H and 1 part He, and very little else. As a nebula collapses to form a star, sometimes a million from one nebula, a protostar forms. It, at this point, is already hot from all that crashing down of the gas and dust -- look what one large meteor can do to our surface.

So the core of the protostar gets hotter and hotter and glows brighter and brighter. When the temperature in the core gets into the millions of degrees, fusion begins. Deuterium (H2) will be first, IIRC, but this doesn't last long since there is so very little of it. Once temperatures are high enough, hydrogen (H) begins fusing into helium (He) and the protostar will very quickly become qualified as a "star".

As hydrogen depletes, the star contracts and the core temperature increases. Eventually, helium will begin to dominate the fusion process. As it depletes, the star, of course increases in core temperature, but only the most massive stars are capable of getting hot enough to move up the elemental chain.

Explosions (Type II supernovae) come when the elemental chain reaches iron and that's a huge problem for the star. This absorbs energy instead of supplying it. So, in almost an instant, the core collapses causing catastrophic events that lead to the outer regions of the star to explode as the core, as you mentioned, implodes.

Stars like our Sun aren't close to being massive enough for this to happen, but during as hydrogen depletes and helium fusion is active in the core, its outer layers will be blown away (think non-violently but at high speeds). The result for our Sun will be that it will run out of fuel (He) and the core will contract into a ball about the size of the Earth, thus becoming a very hot white dwarf (that will look bluish white). Notice that you don't hear it called a white dwarf "star", since WDs are not officially stars, though they certainly glow.
Explosions (Type II supernovae) come when the elemental chain reaches iron and that's a huge problem for the star. This absorbs energy instead of supplying it. So, in almost an instant, the core collapses causing catastrophic events that lead to the outer regions of the star to explode as the core, as you mentioned, implodes.
So could the star start opening up to turn itself inside out when runs into trouble like with iron and the materials inside of the star keeping it safe, cause the beginning of the explosion or do you think what's being held inside a star never comes out until the explosion? Thanks for the info.
 
Jun 1, 2020
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So could the star start opening up to turn itself inside out when runs into trouble like with iron and the materials inside of the star keeping it safe, cause the beginning of the explosion or do you think what's being held inside a star never comes out until the explosion? Thanks for the info.
Well, the core region would implode (inward) forming either a neutron star or a black hole.

But the layers just outside the core could be so disrupted in such a SN that they spew outward past the outer layers. The modeling, at least in the past (e.g. Wheeler) indicate non-symmetric explosions, thus certain regions get blasted more than others.

So you may be right. What is interesting is that this might have already been shown to be true. The inner layers (closer to the core) also go through fusion due to temperature and pressures near the core, so the composition (heavier elements called metals by astronomers) would be spewed in a way that would present higher concentrations in the discharged cloud than other regions. I don't know if this is known or not. The 1987 SN is so heavily studied that a report of compositional differences, if they exist, may have been discovered.
 
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Jun 1, 2020
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A star's stability is its balance of forces and properties, including gravity, density and pressure (taken straight from a search on the internet).
Yes, this is often referred to as "hydrostatic equilibrium", which is critical to be a Main Sequence star. It is a self-regulating process, amazingly.
 
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