Light speed versus very Very VERY near Light speed.

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ramparts

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Hi Solifugae,

There's obviously no way to "prove" what we've been saying. In fact, unlike math, one can never prove anything in physics. There's always a chance, however infinitesimally small, that our current beliefs are wrong. The smallness of that chance is directly related to the quality and quantity of our supporting evidence. What we've told you follows directly from the mathematics of special relativity. The tests have been done with exquisite precision, such as tests comparing the time clocks measure on Earth and on planes, or tests measuring the speed of light in different reference frames (the last one is especially important - these infinities follow directly from the fact that the speed of light is the same in all frames. That's the heart of special relativity). To the extent that we have yet to measure any deviations from the theory, we can be very reasonably confident about aspects of the theory which are logically connected to what we've tested.
 
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origin

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Solifugae":cikh9s3a said:
I understand what you're saying, but how do we know it works this way? What experiment showed us that the gradiant to c works this way? I know that relativity has been outright proven, but what in particular demonstrates that it is an asymptote and will result in infinity at c?
The best experiments would be the entire field of particle accelerators. The amount of energy required to accelerate charged particles to velocities up to just under the speed of light (for the LHC) agree completely with the energy/velocity relationship for matter and the speed of light
 
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Solifugae

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tests measuring the speed of light in different reference frames (the last one is especially important - these infinities follow directly from the fact that the speed of light is the same in all frames. That's the heart of special relativity).
Ah, well that explains it then. If the speed of light was too slightly different to measure in various frames, then what I'm saying could actually be real, but it is only conjecture. We have to go on what we know/can see, so there's plenty to assume that light is exactly the same in all reference frames.
 
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Oxize

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What about Plancks (E=hf) theory ? With this theory you can obtain light speed and further. It only not fits in our on earth daily model.

What about the higher energy waves?
 
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origin

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Oxize":1u71iwqo said:
What about Plancks (E=hf) theory ? With this theory you can obtain light speed and further. It only not fits in our on earth daily model.

What about the higher energy waves?
How do you figure? Plancks law assumes that the speed of light is constant.

Higher energy means higher frequency (or shorter wavelengths) but no change in the speed of the EM radiation.
 
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