Miracles and science

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Anonymous

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Would an occasional miracle eliminate the possibility of science?<br /><br />(Miracles do not only mean mythcal things) <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <strong><font size="2"><p align="center"><br /><img id="a9529085-d63d-481e-9277-832ea5d58917" src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/9/2/a9529085-d63d-481e-9277-832ea5d58917.Large.gif" alt="blog post photo" /><br /><font color="#339966">Oops! this is my alien friend.</font></p><p align="center"><font color="#ff6600">╬→Ť╠╣є ’ M€ ’<br />╬→ Ðôŵņ2Ëãřŧĥ ๑<br />╬→ ЙДm€ :Varsha<br /></font></p></font></strong> </div>
 
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enigma10

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If a miracle occured within the theatre of scientific research, it would only expedite the research to its goal, and open the venue toward the next project.<br /><br /> Of course, to define a miracle in general could be a subject of some debate, but little scientific grounds. Within this atmosphere of discussion, the possibility of science would be mote. <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <em>"<font color="#333399">An organism at war with itself is a doomed organism." - Carl Sagan</font></em> </div>
 
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kyle_baron

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miracle<br /><br />The laws of Nature are overruled, suspended, or modified by God, or a supernatural being. I didn't see anything mentioning science in the link. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font size="4"><strong></strong></font></p> </div>
 
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CalliArcale

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I would define a miracle to be an event whose cause is not only unknown, but seemingly inconceivable. Would, then, a miracle preclude science? No, for science does not cease merely because it is not omniscient. A lot of people make the mistake of thinking of science as something like religious doctrine, but it's not. It's completely different. It's a process, and therefore cannot be precluded simply by a situation where no one has yet successfully used science to find something out. "I don't know" is a valid and sometime quite appropriate answer in science. Science isn't about finding all answers; it's about seeking answers with brutal self-honesty. And sometimes all you find out is that you don't know.<br /><br />Or, as the good Doctor once put it, "In science, nothing is inexplicable: only unexplained." <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><font color="#666699"><em>"People assume that time is a strict progression of cause to effect, but actually from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint it's more like a big ball of wibbly wobbly . . . timey wimey . . . stuff."</em>  -- The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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alokmohan

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There are many things we dont know.Right .But if you bring a supernatural exolanation,its miracle.Saints healing cancer by touch ,is example of miacle.
 
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enigma10

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Yes. Thanks for simplifying even more what i said. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <em>"<font color="#333399">An organism at war with itself is a doomed organism." - Carl Sagan</font></em> </div>
 
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alokmohan

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In this world there are things that seem on the verge of being discovered every so often, yet never quite materialize. The “Lost City” of Atlantis, for example, has been claimed to have been found at least a half dozen times. One researcher is pretty sure it is in Bolivia; another says it is Antarctica; a third claims that Bimini beachrock may be from the lost civilization (see Eugene Shinn’s article in the January/February 2004 SI). So it is with Noah’s Ark. <br /><br />The difference is, of course, that the implications of Noah’s Ark actually being found extend far beyond archaeology. The weight of all the world’s animals is nothing compared to the religious freight that the Ark carries. <br /><br />The Ark story is implausible on the face of it; there simply wouldn’t be enough space on the boat to accommodate two (or seven, depending on the source) of every living animal (including dinosaurs), along with the food and water necessary to keep them alive for over six months. Still, biblical literalists—those who believe that proof of the Bible’s events remains to be found—have spent lives and fortunes trying to validate their beliefs. <br /><br />Before discussing the recent claims regarding the whereabouts of Noah’s vessel, a history of Ark “finds” is instructive. Violet M. Cummings is the author of several books on Noah’s Ark, among them Noah’s Ark: Fable or Fact? (1975), in which she claimed that Noah’s Ark was found on Turkey’s Mount Ararat. According to the 1976 book and film In Search of Noah’s Ark, “there is now actual photographic evidence that Noah’s Ark really does exist.... Scientists have used satellites, computers, and powerful cameras to pinpoint the Ark’s exact location on Mt. Ararat.” This is a rather remarkable claim, for despite repeated trips to Mt. Ararat over the past thirty years, the Ark remains elusive. Undeterred by a lack of evidence, in 1982 Cummings issued a book titled, Has Anybody Really Seen Noah’s Ark?, published by Creation-Life Publishers
 
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enigma10

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What on earth are you trying to accomplish by first responding to my post with an extremely short version of what i said, minus a word "be", and then continuing to respond with links to a skeptics site?<br /><br /><i>It fights miracles.</i>-the site fights miracles?<br /><br /><i>There can no miracle. </i>- i can only assume there was suppose to be a "be" between "can" and "no"?<br /><br /><br /> I can only assume you dont know english fluently. If this is so, please try to respond to posts you can read and understand. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <em>"<font color="#333399">An organism at war with itself is a doomed organism." - Carl Sagan</font></em> </div>
 
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alokmohan

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This not a test class for passing english,I dont understand what exites you I suggest you read the magazine.
 
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vogon13

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Your having a vision of the 2007 Rose Parade doesn't eliminate my need for a High Definition TV.<br /><br />Miracles, real or imagined, are irrelevant.<br /><br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#ff0000"><strong>TPTB went to Dallas and all I got was Plucked !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#339966"><strong>So many people, so few recipes !!</strong></font></p><p><font color="#0000ff"><strong>Let's clean up this stinkhole !!</strong></font> </p> </div>
 
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ldyaidan

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I think there will always be things we can't explain... Whether they are miracles, or just things we have not yet discovered answers to remains to be seen. I believe that miracles are based on perception...What was considered miraculous a thousand years ago may be something we understand now as scientific fact. Things we may see now as miracles may be explained later by science. Undiscovered science or miracle....as long as we still have questions to be answered, in my opinion, is what is important.<br /><br /><br />Rae
 
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enigma10

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/ignore.<br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <em>"<font color="#333399">An organism at war with itself is a doomed organism." - Carl Sagan</font></em> </div>
 
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sponge

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<img src="/images/icons/rolleyes.gif" /><img src="/images/icons/wink.gif" /><img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /><img src="/images/icons/laugh.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em><u>SPONGE</u></em></p> </div>
 
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alokmohan

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But one must appreciate that science drove out miracles.Every thing has an explanation,if it not just now it may be in future.
 
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